Constant chatter at Code4Lib

As illustrated by the chart, it seems as if the chatter was constant during the most recent Code4Lib conference.

For a good time and in the vein of text mining, I made an effort to collect as many tweets with the hash tag #c4l11 as well as the backchannel log files. (“Thanks, lbjay!”). I then parsed the collection into fields (keys, author identifiers, date stamps, and chats/tweets), and stuffed them into a database. I then created a rudimentary tab-delimited text file consisting of a key (representing a conference event), a start time, and an end time. Looping through this file I queried my database returning the number of chats and tweets associated with each time interval. Lastly, I graphed the result.

chatter at code4lib
Constant chatter at Code4Lib, 2011

As you can see there are a number of spikes, most notably associated with keynote presentations and Lightning Talks. Do not be fooled, because each of these events are longer than balance of the events in the conference. The chatter was rather constant throughout Code4Lib 2011.

When talking about the backchannel, many people say, “It is too distracting; there is too much stuff there.” I then ask myself, “How much is too much?” Using the graph as evidence, I can see there are about 300 chats per event. Each event is about 20-30 minutes long. That averages out to 10ish chats per minute or 1 item every 6 seconds. I now have a yardstick. When the chat volume is equal to or greater than 1 item every 6 seconds, then there is too much stuff for many people to follow.

The next step will be to write a program allowing people to select time ranges from the chat/tweet collection, extract the associated data, and apply analysis tools against them. This includes things like concordances, lists of frequently used words and phrases, word clouds, etc.

Finally, just like traditional books, articles, microforms, and audio-visual materials things things like backchannel log files, tweets, blogs, and mailing list archives are forms of human expression. Do what degree do these things fall into the purview of library collections? Why (or why not) should libraries actively collect and archive them? If it is within our purview, then what do libraries need to do differently in order build such collections and take advantage of their fulltext nature?