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Title: Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1895
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Title: Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1895

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[Transcriber's Note: Some portions of the original text were illegible;
these portions are noted with an asterisk (*).]

[Title page]
[Illustration:



SPALDING'S

SPECIAL ATHLETIC LIBRARY

BASE BALL

GUIDE

1895]







[Advertisement]
The Leader for 1895
is
The Spalding Bicycle.

ITS NAME IS ITS GUARANTEE.

_The name stands for the Highest Grade in Athletic Goods throughout the
world, and now stands for THE HIGHEST-GRADE BICYCLE MADE._

THE SPALDING BICYCLE ...
DURING THE YEAR 1894 MADE A PHENOMENAL RECORD

A. H. Barnett on the Spalding Bicycle won the Great Irvington-Milburn
Road Race ... Monte Scott, of the Crescent Wheelman, on the Spalding
Bicycle made new world's road records for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 miles,
and ... Fred Titus at Springfield, on September 13th rode 27 miles, 1489
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Watch the Spalding Team for '95--SANGER-TITUS-CABANNE.

A.G. SPALDING & BROS.
NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA

*AT CHICOPEE



[Illustration: Albert G. Spalding.]

BASE BALL GUIDE
AND
OFFICIAL LEAGUE BOOK FOR 1895.

       *       *       *       *       *

A Complete Hand Book Of The National Game
Of Base Ball,

Containing The
Full Official League Records
For 1894,


Together With

The New Code Of Playing Rules As Revised By The
Committee Of Rules.

Attached To Which Are Explanatory Notes, Giving A
Correct Interpretation Of The New Rules.

       *       *       *       *       *

A Prominent Feature Of The
Guide For 1895
Is The New Championship Record; Added To Which Are
The Complete Pitching Records Of 1894 And
Special Chapters On The
Fielding And Base Running
Of 1894,


Together With

Interesting Records Of The Most Noteworthy Contests, Incidents
And Occurrences Of The Eventful Season Of 1894, Occurring
In The College Arenas As Well As In
That Of The Professional Clubs.

       *       *       *       *       *

Edited By
Henry Chadwick.

Published By
American Sports Publishing Company,
241 Broadway, New York




PUBLISHERS' NOTICE.

The official handbook of America's national game--SPALDING'S BASE BALL
GUIDE--which was first issued in 1876, has grown in size, importance and
popular favor year by year, until it has become the great standard
statistical and reference annual of the game throughout the base ball
world; and it is now recognized as the established base ball manual of
the entire professional fraternity, as well as the authorized _Guide
Book_ of the great National League, which is the controlling
governmental organization of the professional clubs of the United
States.

The _Guide_ of 1895 not only records the doings of the twelve clubs of
the National League for the past season, with all the official
statistics, but it gives space to the championship campaigns of 1894,
not only of the Minor Professional Leagues of the country, but also of
those of the College clubs and of the leading organizations of the
amateur class--the majority class of the entire base ball world--and in
this respect the _Guide_ has no equal, the book of 1895 being
exceptionally full of the most interesting chapters of the leading
events of the diamond fields of the past year, and for the first time
contains many fine half-tone illustrations of all the leading clubs and
players, making it the largest and most complete Guide ever issued.

Copies of the _Guide_ will be mailed to any address upon receipt of
twelve cents each. Trade orders supplied through the News Companies, or
direct from the Publishers,

American Sports Publishing Company,
241 Broadway, New York.



The _Guide_, as hitherto, is issued under the entire editorial control
of the veteran writer on sports, Mr. Henry Chadwick, popularly known as
"The Father of Base Ball."

The great size of the _Guide_ precludes the possibility of including the
game record of the League campaign, as also other records of League
legislation, etc., and these will be found in the "Official League
Book," which contains only official League matter, as furnished by
Secretary Young, including the League Constitution in full.




PREFACE.

SPALDING'S BASE BALL GUIDE for 1895 is the twentieth annual edition of
the work issued under the auspices of the National League. It is also
the fifteenth annual edition published under the editorship of Mr. Henry
Chadwick, he having first entered upon his editorial duties on the GUIDE
in 1881. Moreover, it is the fourth annual edition issued under the
government of the existing major League, which League was the result of
the reconstruction measures adopted during the winter of 1891-92; and
this latest issue of SPALDING'S LEAGUE GUIDE in several respects, if not
in all, surpasses all of its predecessors. New features are presented
in its pages this year which are of special interest; the most
noteworthy being the new record of every game played in the League
championship series---won, lost or drawn---from April 19 to September
30, 1894, inclusive; the names of the opposing pitchers in each game;
being a record never before published in any base ball manual, this
alone making the GUIDE of 1895 a model book of reference for the whole
base ball fraternity. Added to this are not only the full statistics of
the League season of 1894, but also special articles on the latest
scientific points of play developed in the professional arena; together
with editorial comments on the leading events of the past season---now
regarded as one of the interesting features of the book---and the scores
of the model games of 1894, etc. A new chapter is "The Reference Guide,"
devoted to statistics valuable as references. In addition to which is
the new code of rules which went into effect in April, 1895, and the
editorial explanatory appendix, revised by President Young of the
League; the whole making the GUIDE the model base ball manual of the
period, the book being of special value, alike to the amateur class of
the base ball fraternity, as to the class of professional exemplars of
the game.

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
241 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY.

       *       *       *       *       *

WASHINGTON, D. C, March, 1895.

By authority vested in me, I do hereby certify that Messrs.
A. G. Spalding & Bros, have been granted the _exclusive_ right
to publish the "OFFICIAL LEAGUE BOOK" for 1895.

N. E. YOUNG,
Secretary of the National League and American Association of Professional
Base Ball Clubs.

[Illustration A.G. Mills; N.E. Young; Wahulbert--The Three Presidents]
[Illustration: Baltimore Base Ball Club. Champions of 1894.]
[Illustration]
[Illustration: New York Base Ball Club, '94.]




INTRODUCTION.

The decade of the nineties in League history bids fair to surpass, in
exciting events, that of every preceding series of years known in the
annals of professional base ball. The decade in question began with the
players' revolt in 1890 and was followed up by the secession of the old
American Association, a fatal movement, which ended in the death of that
organization in the winter of 1891-92; the reorganization of the
National League resulting in the absorption of the best half of the old
Association clubs and the beginning of the experiment of governing the
whole professional fraternity by one _major League_ instead of by a
dual government as before; this one powerful League being itself
controlled by the laws of the "_National Agreement_." The cost of the
amalgamation of the four American Association clubs with the National
League, together with the financial losses incurred by the revolutionary
period of 1890 and 1891--losses, by the way, which the players did not
participate in, the clubs alone being the sufferers--left a heavy burden
of debt to handicap the reconstructed National League in its efforts to
recover the public confidence in professional ball playing lost by the
malcontents of 1890 and 1891. But, nevertheless, the seasons of 1892
and 1893 saw the heavy indebtedness removed from the League's shoulders;
and in 1894 the flourishing financial times of 1888 and 1889 were, in a
measure, renewed, and for the first time since the Brotherhood revolt of
1890, the professional base ball business in 1894 became a paying
investment.

It will scarcely be believed that, in the face of the financial losses
incurred during the revolutionary period of 1890 and 1891, that the
closing part of the season of 1894 saw another attempt made to renew the
troubles of 1891, by an effort made to resuscitate the defunct American
Association under the banner of "_Death to the League's reserve rule_,"
together with that of a joint attempt made to revive the old Brotherhood
plan of rival League clubs in the larger base ball cities of the Union.
This revolutionary effort, made by one of the promoters of the revolt of
1890, aided by two dismissed managers and a disgruntled star player
itching for notoriety at any cost, led the magnates of the National
League to adopt repressive measures calculated to put an end to any
future revolutionary efforts of the kind, by severely punishing any
League club manager or player who should prove recreant in fealty to the
laws of the National Agreement, or who should join in any attempt to
organize any base ball association opposed to the reserve rule, which
rule over ten years' experience had proved to be the fundamental law and
corner-stone of the professional base ball business. Without such a
repressive law it was evident that the League would be subject to
periodical attempts on the part of unscrupulous managers or players to
war upon the reserve rule for blackmail purposes. The necessity for some
such law was made evident by the recent efforts made to organize a new
American Association on the basis of not only warring upon the reserve
rule but of trespassing on the territorial rights of existing League
clubs.



#The League Manifesto of 1894.#

The finale to the annual meeting of 1894 was the issuing of a manifesto
by the National League, which was called forth by an effort at treachery
in the League ranks which required prompt action for its
repression. This manifesto was issued without regard to efforts to
organize a new American Association, any opposition of the kind to the
National Agreement clubs, with the major League at its head, being
looked upon as futile, owing to the character of the men alleged to be
at the head of the movement; the main incentive of the League magnates
being to publicly announce what the penalty of treachery to National
Agreement interests would be in the future. The manifesto in question
was the work of a special committee appointed by the National League at
its annual meeting in November, 1894, which consisted of Messrs. Chas.
H. Byrne, H. R, Von der Horst, James A. Hart and John T. Brush.

The following is the statement drawn up by the committee, and referred
to the National Board for adoption:

TO THE NATIONAL BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL ASSOCIATIONS:

From the year 1876, when base ball was established in this country on a
substantial and responsible basis by the disbandment of the so-called
National Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs and the
organization of the National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs,
down to the present time, the duty has been imposed upon some body or
organization to uphold and enforce the objects for which base ball was
established, to wit:

First--To perpetuate base ball as the national game of the United
States, and to surround it with such safeguards as to warrant for the
future absolute public confidence in its integrity and methods.

Second--To protect and promote the mutual interests of professional base
ball clubs and professional base ball players.

The National League formed in 1876 found a difficult task before it in
undertaking to carry out the objects above referred to. Interest in base
ball was at a low ebb. Gamblers were in possession. The game was without
discipline, organization or legitimate control. The sport was conducted
with dishonest methods and for dishonest purposes, and had neither the
respect nor confidence of the press or public. Heroic methods were
absolutely necessary. At a meeting of the National League, held in
Cleveland December 5, 1877, the League directors unanimously ratified
the action of the Louisville club in expelling from the professional
ranks James A. Devlin, W. H. Craver, A. H. Nichols and G. W. Hall "for
conduct in contravention to the object of the League."

These men had been charged with and convicted of willfully selling a
game of base ball. At first the action of the League in taking such an
extreme course was strongly denounced. The League, however, foresaw that
any condonation of fraud or crookedness meant death to the national game
and remained firm in its position. Public opinion soon turned, and
to-day it is universally conceded that the course then taken did more to
establish the honesty and integrity of base ball than any action taken
or legislation since enacted. From that day to this no charge of
crookedness or dishonesty has been made against a professional ball
player. Repeated attempts have been made to reinstate these men or those
of them now living, but their expulsion was final and irrevocable.

That the League was earnest in its efforts to purify the game was
further demonstrated by its action taken at a special meeting held at
the Russell House, Detroit, Mich., on June 24, 1882, when Richard
Higham, a League umpire, was, upon charges preferred by the Detroit
club, expelled for "crooked" work as an umpire. From that day to this no
such charge has ever been made against an official umpire. The rapid
increase in the compensation of ball players soon opened up another
avenue of trouble for the League, which needed and received prompt
attention. This was flagrant and open dissipation in the ranks at home
and abroad. While this was confined comparatively to a few men, the
innocent suffered largely from it, and the National League was brought
into disrepute. Heroic measures were again adopted, and several players
were indefinitely suspended, with excellent effect. It is safe to say
that to-day there is less dissipation and drunkenness in the ranks of
professional ball players in proportion to their number than in any
other organized or unorganized body in this country identified with
outdoor sports.

The success achieved by the National League in its efforts to develop
base ball as the national game became apparent in its rapid growth in
popular favor, and the establishment of clubs and associations
throughout the various States. It became evident soon that something
must be done to foster and protect the rights and interests of these
various bodies, and "that there was a recognized need of some central
power in base ball to govern all associations, by an equitable code of
general laws, to put the game on a prosperous and lasting basis."

To accomplish this purpose a meeting was held in the Fifth Avenue Hotel,
New York, February 17, 1883, at which delegates were present
representing the National League, the American Association, and the
Northwestern League. At that meeting the so-called Tripartite Agreement
was drawn up and agreed to, which substantially was an offensive and
defensive alliance, embodying a mutual respect of all contracts and
other obligations, and all rights of the parties to the agreement to
territorial rights, players under contract or held under reserve.

The adoption of the tripartite agreement opened a new era in base ball,
and it was so readily recognized as being a step in the line of progress
that when the committee which drew up the agreement was called together
in New York city in October, 1883, they decided to call the instrument
they had framed the National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs,
the purpose being to open the door to all clubs, leagues and
associations desiring to live under the conditions, rules and
regulations of the agreement. Immediately several leagues and
associations applied for the protection assured the, and readily pledged
themselves to abide by the requirements designated in the agreement.

The action of the committee in framing the new national agreement was
subsequently ratified by the signatures of the Presidents of the parties
thereto, viz.:

The National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, A. G. Mills,
President, November 22, 1883.

The American Association of Base Ball Clubs, H. D. McKnight, President,
December 13, 1883.

The Northwestern League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, Elias Mather,
President, January 10, 1884.

The Eastern League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, William C. Sedden,
President, February 19, 1884.

The fundamental principle of the national agreement as originally drawn,
and which is now in operation, is a respect for territorial
rights. This, in fact, is the corner stone of the structure.

It contemplates and provides for the organization of cities into leagues
or associations, with one club, and one only, in each city, and a
contest between the respective cities for championship honors. The
interest which base ball arouses in any city is based absolutely on
local pride. The essence of value to a championship is entirely to the
city to which the victorious club belongs.

Experience has demonstrated that whenever and wherever territorial
rights have been invaded and rival clubs established, the element of
local pride is absent and interest in both destroyed. It is this which
makes a respect for territorial rights a principle which we must uphold.

It is true, nevertheless, and we so declare that we will gladly welcome
and shall encourage the formation of leagues and associations who desire
to operate under the national agreement, and consent to abide by the
fundamental principles of that document.

Reference has been made above to the difficulties and the obstacles
which at times have presented themselves and which have been by severe
but just methods removed.

To-day the future of base ball is confronted by a new condition, a
condition which in every particular is as harmful and in many respects
far more dangerous than open dishonesty or flagrant dissipation. That
is, treachery within the lines. To-day, and for months past we have had
men identified with professional base ball who for years have been the
beneficiaries of the game, have received liberal compensation for the
work they have done, earned their livelihood entirely and absolutely
from the opportunities afforded them by clubs and organizations
operating under the national agreement, and we find and now know that
these men, during this time, have persistently been identifying
themselves with schemes and combinations the objects and sole purposes
of which are to weaken and perhaps destroy the splendid fabric of our
national game, which it has taken years of effort, anxiety and large
outlay of capital to construct.

To-day we have the confidence of the public and the press of the country
in the methods and the integrity of base ball in larger measure than at
any prior period in the history of our national game. It devolves upon
us to continue to deserve and retain this confidence. We must endeavor
to do it.

The interests of clubs and professional ball players are identical. One
cannot succeed without the other. Success means mutual benefit. The
moment any suspicion attaches to base ball, public confidence lost or
even chilled, the occupation of the ball player is gone. We must all
stand or fall together. There is no middle ground. We stand by the
fundamental law, our national agreement, which guarantees protection to
players as well as to clubs, or we destroy it. One road leads to the
perpetuation of the national game, the other to its decline. There
should be no place, no standing room in base ball for any anarchistic
element which never aids in building up but is ever ready to destroy.

The time has come when some action should be taken to place this element
without the pale of our ranks. The National Board, operating under the
national agreement, was created to protect and guard the interests of
all players, clubs and associations identified with the agreement. Any
attempt to encroach upon that, to nullify or affect any of its
provisions, is of direct and material concern to all alike.

The obligations of contracts, the right of reserve, and the territorial
rights of clubs, associations and leagues must be upheld, and shall be,
at any cost.

It is a matter of public rumor and is also a fact which has come to our
knowledge that men identified with clubs, members of the national
agreement, have been co-operating in the formation of clubs or
organizations whose purpose is to conflict with the national
agreement. In view of this knowledge, the National League and American
Association of Professional Clubs in convention assembled respectfully
suggests to and requests the National Board to declare A. C.
Buckenberger, William Barnie and Fred Pfeffer ineligible to be
employed either as manager or player or in any capacity whatever, by any
club or organization operating under the national agreement, and they be
forthwith suspended. Such suspension to remain in force until such time
as they or either of them can satisfy the National Board that they have
in no way been engaged directly or indirectly in the organization of any
club, league or association formed or to be formed in conflict with the
principles of the national agreement. And in the event of their failure
to relieve themselves from this suspension within such time as your
Board may direct, they shall be expelled and forever debarred from any
connection with clubs or organizations identified with the National
Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs.

We furthermore request that your Board take like action in the case of
any player, manager, umpire or club official who in the future
identifies himself with a similar movement.

C. H. BYRNE,
J. T. BRUSH,
JAMES A. HART,
H. R. VON DER HORST,
N. E. YOUNG.

The above address was submitted to the National League at its annual
meeting, fully discussed and unanimously adopted.



Appended is the decision of the National Board:

To all National Agreement Clubs, Leagues, and Associations:

At a meeting of the National Board of Professional Base Ball Clubs, held
in New York city November 16, 1894, a communication was received from
the National League and American Association of Professional Base Ball
Clubs, in convention assembled, requesting this Board to take action in
the case of certain individuals heretofore identified with clubs
operating under the national agreement who have been charged with
treachery to their employers and the organizations with which they have
been identified. The request, so presented, was supplemented by an
appeal from the executive officers of the Eastern League of Base Ball
Clubs and the Western League of Base Ball Clubs to take such action as
was proper to protect said leagues in the rights assured them under the
national agreement.

After mature consideration, and governed absolutely by a desire to
comply with the letter and spirit of the requests made to this Board,
and having reasonable and substantial evidence upon which to base our
action.

This Board has decided to announce, and it does declare that A. C,
Buckenberger, William Barnie and Fred Pfeffer are ineligible to be
employed either as manager, player or in any other capacity by any club
or organization identified with the national agreement, and said persons
are hereby declared suspended.

This Board further declares that such suspension shall remain in force
up to and including December 31, 1894, and in the event of the failure
of the above named persons, or either of them, on or before the above
named date, to show to this Board that he or they have been in no
manner, directly or indirectly, engaged in any attempt to promote the
organization of clubs, leagues or associations antagonistic to the
national agreement, they shall be expelled and forever debarred from any
connection with clubs or organized bodies operating under the national
agreement.

N.E. YOUNG,
A.H. SODEN,
C.H. BYRNE,



The foregoing action was partially caused by the following
communication:

NEW YORK, November 15, 1894.
TO THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL
BASE BALL CLUBS.

_Gentlemen_: We the representatives of the undersigned leagues,
operating under the National Agreement of Professional Base Ball Clubs,
respectfully submit the following: Your body is the recognized major
base ball organization of the country, and have sole right to elect the
National Board and control all bodies identified with the agreement.

It has been made known to us, and we have good and substantial reasons
for believing that such knowledge is correct, that a new organization of
base ball clubs is contemplated, which, of necessity, must operate
without the pale of the national agreement. It appears also that it is
the purpose of the new association, if it materializes, to attempt to
take from our respective organizations and clubs players now held by us
under the right of reservation accorded us by the national agreement. We
therefore request that you, as a body, take some action to protect us,
so far as possible, against all outside organizations. We trust you will
give this immediate attention, and we await your action.

Respectfully,

B.B. JOHNSON, Sec. Western League, P.B.B.C.
P.T. POWERS, Pres. Eastern League.



       *       *       *       *       *

#The Base Ball Season of 1894.#

To professional base ball, as governed by the existing National League,
is mainly due the great popularity our national game has achieved within
the past twenty years. Of course the amateur class of the fraternity
greatly outnumber the professionals; but the game could never have
reached its present point of excellence in field work but for the time
and attention the professional clubs were enabled to devote to its
thorough development from the year of Harry Wright's famous "Red
Stocking" nine of Cincinnati, in 1869, to the existing period of model
professional ball playing. In the first place, the amateur clubs could
never have given the game the time and labor required for its evolution
which the professional clubs were enabled to do; and, moreover, not one
club in a thousand could have spared the money required to fit up and
keep in serviceable condition such finely equipped ball grounds as those
now owned by the leading professional clubs of the National League. To
these facts, too, are to be added the statement that to the National
League's government of the professional class of the fraternity is due
the lasting credit of sustaining the integrity of play in the game up to
the highest standard; so much so, indeed, that it has reached the point
of surpassing, in this most important respect, every other sport in
vogue in which professional exemplars are employed. Take it for all in
all, no season since the inauguration of the National League in 1876, has
approached that of 1894 in the number of clubs which took part in the
season's games, both in the amateur as well as the professional arena;
and certainly no previous season ever saw the professional clubs of the
country so well patronized as they were in 1894. Moreover, it was the
most brilliant and successful season in every respect known in the
annals of the college clubs of the country. In fact, there was but one
drawback to the creditable success of the entire championship campaigns
of 1894, and that was the unwonted degree of "hoodlumism" which
disgraced the season in the professional arena, and this, we regret to
say, was painfully conspicuous among the players of the National League
clubs, this organization having been noted, prior to its absorption of
the old American Association element in its ranks in 1892, for the
reputable character of its annual struggles for championship honors. One
result of the rowdy ball playing indulged in by a minority of each club
team in the League was a decided falling off in the attendance of the
best class of patrons of the professional clubs.

Much of the "_Hoodlumism_"--a technical term applicable to the use of
_blackguard language; low cunning tricks_, unworthy of manly players;
_brutal assaults_ on umpire and players; that nuisance of our ball
fields, "kicking," and the dishonorable methods comprised in the term
"_dirty ball playing_"---indulged in in 1894 was largely due to the
advocacy of the method of the so-called "_aggressive policy_," which
countenanced rowdy ball playing as part and parcel of the work in
winning games. The most energetic, lively and exciting method of playing
a game of ball can mark a professional club contest without its being
disgraced by a single act of rowdyism--such as that of spiking or
willfully colliding with a base runner; bellowing like a wild bull at
the pitcher, as in the so-called coaching of 1893 and 1894; or that of
"kicking" against the decisions of the umpire to hide faulty captaincy
or blundering fielding. Nothing of this "hoodlumism" marked the play of
the four-time winners of the League pennant from 1872 to 1875,
inclusive, viz., the old, gentlemanly Boston Red Stockings of the early
seventies, under the leadership of that most competent of all managers,
Harry Wright. Yet, despite of this old time fact, if club managers do
not adopt the rough's method of playing the game, as illustrated in the
League arena in 1894, advocated by the class of newspaper managers of
local clubs, the scribes in question go for the local team officials for
not having a team with "plenty of ginger" in their work and for their
not being governed by "a hustling manager." Is it any wonder, under such
circumstances, that the League season of 1894 was characterized by
"hoodlumism?"

But little advance was made in the way of effective team management in
the League in 1894. About a third of the twelve teams of the League only
were controlled by competent team managers, while at least another third
were wretchedly managed, and the other third were not above the average
in management. Two of the old drawbacks to the successful running of
teams by professional clubs conspicuous in 1892 and 1893 marked the team
management of 1894, viz., the employment of drinking players and the
condoning of their costly offenses, and the interference of club
presidents and directors in the work of the regular manager of the club
team. There is a class of club officials in the League who, for the life
of them, cannot keep from interfering with the club's legitimate manager
in his running of the team. Some of them have the cool effrontery of
stating that "the manager of our team is never interfered with in any
way." One costly result of this club official interference is, that
needed discipline of the players is out of the question, and in its
absence cliqueism in the ranks of the team sets in--one set of players
siding with the manager, and another with the real "boss of the team,"
with the costly penalty of discord in the ranks. It is all nonsense for
a club to place a manager in the position with a merely nominal control
of the players and then to hold him responsible for the non-success of
the team in winning games. Under such a condition of things, the club
manager might sign a team of costly star players and yet find himself
surpassed in the pennant race by a rival manager, who, with _entire
control of his team_, and that team composed of so-called "second-class
players" or ambitious "colts," working in thorough harmony together, and
"playing for the side" all the time and not for a record, as so many of
the star players do, would deservedly carry off the season's honors.

Since the reconstructed National League began its new life, blundering
management of teams has characterized the running of a majority of its
twelve clubs, and it will continue to do so while the system of engaging
players for their records merely and not for their ability in doing team
work and in playing harmoniously together, is continued. Especially,
too, is the plan of engaging players whose daily habits of life are at
war with their ability to do first-class work in the field. Year after
year are drinking offenses condoned by the club officials who run the
club, and old time drunkards re-engaged for the coming season, while
steady, sober players are left out in the cold. Besides this blunder,
there is that of engaging half worn out stars in the place of rising
young players ambitious of distinguishing themselves in the League
arena. This mistake in team management was as conspicuous in 1894 as it
was in 1893.

A feature of the professional base ball season of 1894 was the almost
phenomenal success of the clubs--alike of the minor leagues as of the
great major league itself--in battling against the serious drawback of
the "hard times" of the year, which prevailed throughout the entire
season. Experience shows that in the sports in vogue which have innate
attractions for public patronage in times of great financial
difficulties in the commercial centres of the union, the national game
stands conspicuous; and the past season in this respect presented a most
notable record, no such crowds of spectators ever having been seen at
the leading contests of the season as in 1894.

Another feature of the past season was the interest taken in the college
club contests of the spring and early summer campaign, the leading club
teams giving a superior exhibition of team work play in the field to
that of 1893. In fact, the national game flourished as a whole
throughout the entire country in 1894 as it never had done before in the
history of the game.



#The League Championship Campaign of 1894.#

The struggle for the League's championship pennant in 1894 was the most
noteworthy one on record in one particular respect, and that was in the
exciting struggle by the three leaders of the first division for the
championship, which struggle began on June 20th with the Baltimores
first and Boston second, and was continued on that line until New York
became one of the trio on July 5th, after which date these three clubs
occupied the position of first three in the race to the finish, the
other nine clubs not being "in it" after July 5th. In all other respects
the race for the pennant of 1894 was far from being up to the standard
that should characterize the League's championship season, no less than
three of the minor league pennant races being more evenly contested than
was that of the great major league. From the following record of the
difference in percentage points each season between the leader and tail
ender it will be seen that in no less than seven of the seasons from
1881 to 1894, inclusive, were the pennant races of past seasons superior
in this respect to that of 1894, that of 1891 being the smallest in
difference of points on record.

Here is the record in question:

-------------------------------------------------------------
        POINTS OF            POINTS OF            POINTS OF
YEARS. DIFFERENCE. | YEARS. DIFFERENCE. | YEARS. DIFFERENCE.
-------------------------------------------------------------
1881       277     |  1886     493      |  1890     499
1882       441     |  1887     333      |  1891     223
1883       570     |  1888     303      |  1892     367
1884       400     |  1889     328      |  1893     359
1885       442     |                    |  1894     418
-------------------------------------------------------------

Judging by the percentage figures of the twelve clubs, recorded at the
end of each month's campaign of the season, the race was a one-sided one
almost from the start, the Baltimore and Boston clubs being in the
leading positions from the very outset of the race, the remaining ten
clubs fighting for third place from April 19th to June 20th, when New
York took the lead of the other nine, joining Baltimore and Boston in
the struggle for the leading position.

A League pennant race--or that of a minor league, for that matter--to be
up to the regulation standard, should at least show a difference in
percentage figures varying, on the average, not far from 250 points; a
model race, in these figures, not exceeding 200 points. But this
standard has not been reached in League records for fifteen years, the
best being over 223 points. Then, too, comes the record of the occupancy
of the several positions of the two divisions, this, to a certain
extent, showing the character of the pennant race of the season. In this
regard, an evenly contested race should show a weekly change of position
in each division, for one thing, and also a change from first division
to second division at least once a month. A model race should see the
first three positions changed weekly, the first six places at least
fortnightly, and the tail end positions once a month at farthest. But
what does the figures of the pennant race of the League for 1894 show?
Let us glance at the; records of the occupancy of the first and second
divisions in last year's pennant race. From the 22d of April to the
close of the season, the Baltimore and Boston clubs were never out of
the ranks of the first division clubs; nor were the Chicago, Washington
and Louisville clubs ever out of those of the second division. This
alone was a one-sided condition of affairs in the race. From May 1st to
July 17th the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh clubs occupied positions in
the first division, and the Cleveland club was in the first division
from April 22d to June 27th and from July 17th to the finish, while New
York was in the same division from June 29th to the close and Brooklyn
from August 27th to the end of the season. On the other hand, Chicago,
St. Louis and Cincinnati, together with Washington and Louisville, were
practically out of the race from May to September.

The April campaign finished with St. Louis, Cleveland and Boston tied
for first place in the race, with Philadelphia, Baltimore and Cincinnati
following. Boston and Baltimore's occupancy of fourth and fifth places
being the lowest each occupied during the entire season's campaign,
while Cincinnati's position, tied for that of first in the race on April
20th, was the highest that club reached from April 19th to September
30th; St. Louis, as tied for first place, together with Louisville on
April 20th, was the highest these three clubs reached. Baltimore was
the first to reach the leading place in the race, that club being first,
with the percentage figures of 1.000, on April 24th; St. Louis occupying
the lead on April 28th; Cleveland on May 2d, that club occupying the
leading place from that date to May 28th, when Pittsburgh jumped into
first place for a short time. Boston occupied the lead for the first
time on April 26th. The nearest New York got to the leading position was
on April 19th, when the club was tied for first place with Boston,
St. Louis and Washington. The highest position the "Phillies" reached in
the pennant campaign was second place, which they occupied on May
23d. Brooklyn's highest position was reached on June 22d, when that club
occupied third place. Chicago's highest was eighth place, and the only
clubs which stood in the last ditch were Chicago, up to May 10th;
Washington, from May to August 15th, and afterwards Louisville up to the
finish of the season.

For the first time in the annals of the League, but one western club
occupied a position in the first division as early in the season as July
2d, when the Pittsburgh club stood fourth in the race, following
Baltimore, Boston and Brooklyn, being followed by Philadelphia and New
York, Cleveland at that date being in the second division. On July 17th
Cleveland replaced Brooklyn in the first division, and remained there to
the finish of the race. Pittsburgh was driven into the ranks of the
second division on August 21st, and failed to get back again. Baltimore
had the pennant virtually in hand in August, and New York drove Boston
out of the second place on September 6th, the percentage figures of the
three leaders on that day showing Baltimore to be in the van with .676,
New York .652, and Boston .646; with the "Phillies" fourth, the
Brooklyns fifth and the Clevelands sixth, these relative positions not
afterwards being changed. Neither were those of the clubs in the second
division at that date, except in the case of the Cincinnati and
St. Louis clubs, the team under the Boss Manager, Chris Von der Ahe
beating the Brush-Comiskey combination team of Cincinnati out the very
last day of the race, greatly to the disgust of the Cincinnati cranks.

A great disappointment to the Louisville cranks, whose pet club started
the season with a picked team of star players, containing three
ex-captains of League teams, in Pfeffer, D. Richardson and Tom
Brown--was the sad falling off of that club from the position of being
tied for first place with Baltimore and Boston in April, to a permanent
place in the last ditch in August, a result which relieved Manager
Schmelz considerably, as up to August 22nd Washington had occupied the
tail end position in the race from July 9th to August 23d. Similar bad
management of a club team had retired Pittsburgh from second position,
on June 8th, to seventh place, on July 2d, and it was only through a
wise change of managers that the club was able to retain the lead in the
second division to the end of the campaign.

An incident of the campaign of 1894 was the disastrous start in the race
made by the Chicago club, which occupied the tail end position in the
race at the close of the April campaign and remained in the last ditch
up to May 11th, after which the club gradually passed the Washington,
Louisville, Cincinnati and St, Louis teams, finally occupying eighth
position the last of September. The pennant race of 1894, as a whole,
was a decided failure as far as an evenly contested race was concerned,
the only exception in the way of an exciting struggle for the lead being
that between the three leaders from July 5th to September 30th, this
being the one redeeming feature of the League championship campaign of
1894.



#The Contests for the Pennant in 1894.#

Not since 1890 has a new candidate for League championship been
successful in winning the pennant, but in 1894 another club was added to
the list of League pennant winners, the interest in the annual races, of
course, being thereby proportionately increased. In 1876, when the
League was organized, Chicago was the first city to win League
championship honors, and in 1877 Boston entered the arena of pennant
winners. Next came Providence in 1879, after which a whole decade of
League seasons passed without a new pennant winner being added to the
above two, Detroit winning in 1887 for the first time. Next came New
York in 1888, followed by Brooklyn in 1890, and now Baltimore has
entered the contest arena of champion clubs, that city winning the
honors in 1894. During the intervals of this period of nineteen years of
League championship campaigns the Boston and Chicago clubs won the
majority of pennant races; Boston carrying off the flag during the
seasons of 1877, 1878, 1883, 1891, 1892 and 1893, and Chicago winning in
1876, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1885 and 1886, this latter club being the only
one to win the pennant in three successive years, from 1876 to 1890
inclusive, the Bostons not being three time winners until the seasons of
1891, 1892 and 1893. That club, however, is the only one to win the
championship in four successive seasons--outside of the League--since
the professional championship was inaugurated in 1871, the Bostons
afterwards winning in 1872, 1873, 1874 and 1875. There are now in the
League eight clubs out of the twelve which have yet to win a single
pennant race, viz., the Philadelphia and Washington clubs of the Eastern
divisions, and all six of the Western clubs. There are also but four
clubs now in the League which have never reached higher than second
position since the League was organized, viz., Louisville, 1877--that
club's earned title to first place having been lost by the crookedness
of four of its team of that year--Cincinnati in 1878, Philadelphia in
1887 and Pittsburgh in 1893, while there are two clubs now in the League
which have never reached higher than third place, viz., St. Louis in
1876, and Cleveland in 1880 and 1893. The only aspirant for a position
in League pennant races higher than fourth place at the close of the
season now in the League is the Washington club; so there is plenty of
room to win honors in 1895 if only in getting in among the six leaders
by October next.



#The Three Leading Clubs in the Pennant Race of 1894.#


It is about time that the record of the championship campaigns of each
year should be divided up, in order that the leading minority of the
competing teams may be awarded the additional credit due them for
obtaining positions of special distinction during each season;
beginning, of course, with the winner of the pennant, and followed by
the occupants of _second_ and _third_ positions with the three other
clubs of the first division ranking in due order. By thus extending the
list of honorary positions in the race an additional incentive for
making extra efforts toward the close of the race is given to each one
of the twelve clubs of the League at large. Thus, in the early part of
the championship campaign, if two or three clubs find themselves
hopelessly contending for the pennant itself, there will still be left
over those of the other two honorary places in the race, viz., _second_
and _third_ positions, to compete for; and failing to achieve success to
that extent, there will be one or other of the last three places in the
_first division_ to strive for. This opens the door to win other
creditable places in the season's race to be fought for by the six clubs
of the second division, instead of their losing heart in the contest,
simply because, by the end of the May or June campaign, they are left
without a chance of winning the pennant. It would seem to be, from this
view of the case, an object of special interest for the League to award
a series of honorary prizes to the players of each team attaining one or
other of the three leading positions in the race of each year, in the
proportion, we will say, of $3,000 for the first place, $2,000 for
second and $1,000 for third. In the future the GUIDE will give special
prominence, in its statistical records, to the clubs attaining second
and third positions; in the race, leaving a less detailed record to the
other nine clubs entering the campaign for championship honors, this
change beginning with the GUIDE of 1895. We now present first in order
the complete record of the Baltimore champions of 1894:



#The Campaigns of the Three Leaders and of the First Division Clubs for
1894.#

An interesting statistical chapter of the GUIDE of 1895 includes the
comparative tables of the three leaders in the pennant race of 1894,
viz., those of the Baltimore, New York and Boston clubs, the struggle
between these three clubs being a decidedly attractive feature of the
past season's championship campaign. The season opened on April 19th,
and the close of the first day's play saw the Boston and New York clubs
tied for first place, with Baltimore tied with four other clubs for
second place, only eight of the twelve clubs playing on that day. By the
end of the first month's campaign, on April 30th, Boston had dropped to
third position; Baltimore to fifth place and New York down to ninth in
the race. On May 31st, the close of the second month's campaign,
Baltimore led Boston, being then in third position, and Boston in
fourth, New York having pulled up to sixth place. On June 2d Baltimore
jumped to first place, with Boston fifth and New York seventh. By June
9th the Bostons had got up to second place, but New York was still in
the second division, Baltimore, of course, still leading in the race on
that date. At the end of the third month of the season's campaign, on
June 30th, Baltimore held the lead, with the percentage of victories of
.712, with Boston second, having .667 in percentage figures, while New
York had got back into the first division again with the figures of
.564. On July 5th the "Giants" had worked up to third place, preceded by
Baltimore and Boston, each with the percentage figures respectively of
.679, .672 and .593, it being a close fight at this time between
Baltimore and Boston, while New York was close behind. From July 5th to
the finish these three clubs occupied the three leading positions in the
race, the others being virtually "not in it," as far as winning the
pennant was concerned. This fact alone made the pennant race of 1894 a
very one-sided one, as nearly three months of the season's games
remained to be played. At the end of the July campaign the record showed
Boston in the van, with the percentage figures of .659, to Baltimore's
.618 and New York's .613, Boston having taken the lead from Baltimore on
July 24th, It was just about this time that Boston stock on the racing
market was above par, it being fully expected at this time that the best
the Baltimores would be likely to accomplish would be to retain second
place, while New Yorkers were sanguine at this period of the contest
that the "Giants" would soon lead Baltimore. The Boston champions
retained first position up to July 30th, while New York tried in vain to
push Baltimore out of second place. By, the close of the August campaign
the Baltimores, by a brilliant rally, had replaced Boston in the lead,
the record on August 31st showing Baltimore in the van with the
percentage figures of .657, followed by Boston with .645, and New York
close to the champions with .639. Now came a grand fight for second
place on the part of New York, the Bostons, from this time to the finish
failing to make the accustomed final rally which their friends had
anticipated. On September 6th New York ousted Boston out of second
place, at which date Baltimore led with the percentage figures of .676,
followed by New York with .652, Boston's figures being .646; the rest of
the clubs in the first division at that time being in the five hundreds
only in percentage figures. Boston got down to .632 on September 19th,
New York being then credited with .667 and Baltimore "way up" with
.692. It was now Baltimore's race and New York was regarded as a fixture
for second position, there being a difference in percentage points
between Baltimore and Boston of no less, than 62 points on September
22d; New York then being behind Baltimore 39 points and ahead of Boston
24 points; in fact, a week before the finish, on September 30th, the
positions of the three leaders were fixtures, the only interest left
remaining being the struggle between Philadelphia, Brooklyn and
Cleveland for fourth place. As before remarked, the chief interest in
the September campaign was the expectation on the part of the majority
of the patrons of the game that the Bostons would rally towards the
finish and that the Baltimores would fall off during the last week or
two; instead, however, it was the Boston champions who failed to play up
to their old mark, while it was the Baltimores who did the rallying, and
in fine style, too, under the leadership of the champion manager of the
campaign of 1894.



#The New Champions of 1894.#


The Baltimore Club's Career.

We have the pleasure of greeting a new champion club in the League arena
in the GUIDE of 1895, viz., the Baltimore club, and it is therefore a
point of interest to give a brief resume of its career from the time it
entered the defunct American Association in 1882 to the date of its
being taken into the reconstructed National League in 1892. The
Baltimore club's career in the late American Association was one thing;
that of its progress since the club was taken into the National League
is altogether quite a different matter. From 1882, the year of the
organizing of the old American Association, up to the period of its
secession from the National Agreement ranks in 1891, the Baltimore club
occupied the position of being the occupant of the "last ditch" in the
Association's pennant races for no less than four years, viz., in 1882,
1883, 1885 and 1886. In 1884, when twelve clubs were in the Association
race of that year, the highest the Baltimore club reached was sixth
position. In 1888, 1889 and 1890, the club got no higher than fifth
place in the three races of those years; while the nearest it could get
to first place during the decade of the eighties was in 1887, when it
ended in third place, being led by St. Louis and Cincinnati. During all
that period William Barnie was the club's manager. In 1892 he was
superseded by Manager Hanlon; and from that date to the close of the
past season, the club began to get out of its previous "slough of
despond," induced by its repeated failures to win a pennant race.

Here is the club's record while in the American Association, from 1882
to 1890, inclusive, showing the positions occupied in the several
pennant races of that period:

------------------------------------------------------
                                     NUMBER OF CLUBS
YEAR.       POSITION.                  IN THE RACE.
------------------------------------------------------
1882         Sixth   (last ditch)         Six.
1883         Eighth       "               Eight.
1884         Sixth.                       Twelve.
1885         Eighth  (last ditch)         Eight.
1886         Eighth       "               Eight.
1887         Third.                       Eight.
1888         Fifth.                       Eight.
1889         Fifth.                       Eight.
1890         Fifth.                       Eight.
------------------------------------------------------

In 1891 the Cincinnati club was ahead of the Baltimores when the former
was transferred to Milwaukee, after which the "Reds" broke badly, and
the Baltimores were thus enabled to get into third place. The wretched
management of the Association during the year was costly in
demoralization to every club in the race. Up to the date of the
Cincinnati transfer, that club stood with a percentage of .619, to
Baltimore's .526. During the season of 1892 the Baltimore club occupied
an experimental position in the race of that year, Manager Hanlon not
joining the club in 1892 until too late to get a good team
together. They began the campaign of 1893 low down in the race record,
but they finally pulled up among the six leaders, beating out Brooklyn
in the race by 10 games to 2, as well as St. Louis, Louisville and
Cleveland; but they were so badly beaten by Boston-2 games to 10-and by
Pittsburgh--1 game to 11-that they finished in eighth place only. That
season's experience enabled Manager Hanlon to prepare for 1894 with a
better chance of success than he had had since he took the club in hand,
and the effect of the improved management was made apparent before the
May campaign of 1894 had ended, his team closing that month one among
the three leaders. From that position the club was not afterwards
removed, the team first heading the Bostons and finally taking the lead
in the race, the New Yorks coming in second, ahead of the previous
three-time champion club of Boston.


THE BALTIMORE CLUB'S RECORD.

Under the heading of "The Three Leaders in the Race," will be found the
record of the monthly campaigns of the Baltimores and the progress made
by Hanlon's team from the start to the finish in the race of 1894. We
now give the detailed record of the season's campaign of the Baltimores
in full.

Here is the record of the club's victories, defeats, games played and
drawn, and the percentage of victories made against each individual
club, as well as the grand percentage against all of the eleven opposed
to the Baltimores:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS.            WESTERN CLUBS.
                      P
                      h
                      i       W             P           C   L
                      l       a         C   i       S   i   o
              N       a   B   s         l   t       t   n   u
              e       d   r   h         e   t   C   .   c   i
BALTIMORE     w   B   e   o   i         v   s   h       i   s
                  o   l   o   n         e   b   i   L   n   v
vs.           Y   s   p   k   g         l   u   c   o   n   i
              o   t   h   l   t         a   r   a   u   a   l
              r   o   i   y   o         n   g   g   i   t   l
              k   n   a   n   n         d   h   o   s   i   e      Grand
                                Totals                       Total Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     6   4   6   8  11   35    9   6   9  10  10  10   54   89
Defeats       6   8   4   4   1   23    8   4   2   2   2   2   16   39
Games played 12  12  10  12  12   58   12  10  12  12  12  12   70  128
Drawn games   0   0   1   0   0    1    0   0   0   0   0   0    0    1
Per cent. of
 Victories .500.333.400.667.917 .603 .750.600.750.833.833.833 .771 .695
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that the "Orioles," under Hanlon, did the pennant
winning business up in style in 1894. Of the six Eastern clubs in the
race, they tied the New York "Giants," had the best of the unfinished
series with the "Phillies," took the Brooklyns into camp without
difficulty, had almost a walkover with the Washingtons, and found the
Boston champions the only club that got the best of them in the five
series played against their Eastern adversaries, their percentage of
victories against the Bostons being only .333, while their figures
against the Washingtons were as high as .917. Against their six Western
opponents, the Baltimores almost wiped out the St. Louis, Cincinnati
and Louisville teams, each of these clubs winning but two games out of
the twelve played with the "Orioles," while the best each of the
Cleveland and Chicago teams could do was to win three of the twelve, the
Pittsburgh "Pirates" being the only Western team to trouble them, their
series with that club being unfinished, with a credit of but four
victories to Pittsburgh's six. Only one game was drawn, and that with
the "Phillies."

The additional details of the record follows:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  EASTERN CLUBS.       WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i     W           P        C  L
                        l     a        C  i     S  i  o
                  N     a  B  s        l  t     t  n  u
                  e     d  r  h        e  t  C  .  c  i
BALTIMORE         w  B  e  o  i        v  s  h     i  s
                     o  l  o  n        e  b  i  L  n  v
vs.               Y  s  p  k  g        l  u  c  o  n  i
                  o  t  h  l  t        a  r  a  u  a  l
                  r  o  i  y  o        n  g  g  i  t  l
                  k  n  a  n  n        d  h  o  s  i  e      Grand
                                Totals                 Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won        0  0  0  1  1    2   0  1  1  1  1  1    5    7
Series lost       0  1  0  0  0    1   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    1
Series tied       1  0  0  0  0    1   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    1
Series
 unfinished       0  0  1  0  0    1   0  1  0  0  0  0    1    2
"Chicago"
  victories       0  0  0  0  1    1   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    1
"Chicago"
  defeats         1  0  0  0  0    1   0  0  0  0  0  1    1    2
Won by 1 run      1  0  0  0  1    2   1  0  1  3  2  2    9   11
Lost by 1 run     1  1  1  0  0    3   0  1  1  1  1  0    4    7
Single figure
  victories       2  1  2  4  3   12   6  1  2  7  5  7   28   40
Single figure
  defeats         5  3  2  1  0   11   1  3  1  0  1  1    7   18
Double figure
  victories       4  3  4  4  8   23   3  5  8  3  5  2   26   49
Double figure
  defeats         1  5  2  3  1   12   2  1  2  2  1  1    9   21
Home victories    5  1  4  5  5   20   6  4  7  8  6  6   37   57
Home defeats      1  4  2  2  1   10   1  1  0  1  0  0    3   13
Victories abroad  1  2  3  3  6   15   3  2  2  2  4  4   17   32
Defeats abroad    5  4  2  2  0   13   2  3  3  1  2  2   13   26
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that the Baltimores "shut out" but one Eastern team and
not a single Western opponent, while they themselves were "Chicagoed"
once by each, viz., by New York and Louisville, the tail ender's "shut
out" being annoying. Only two of their contests with the Eastern teams
were won by a single run, but they won three games against the Eastern
teams by one run. They lost seven games by a single run, three of them
in the East and four against Western adversaries. No less than forty of
their games were won by single figure scores, viz., 12 against Eastern
teams and 28 against Western opponents. They lost a total of but 18
single figure games. Their double figure victories were no less than 49,
against but 21 double figure defeats. They won 57 home victories against
32 abroad, the defeats being 18 at home to 26 abroad. Take it all in
all, the Baltimores did splendid work in the box, the field and at the
bat, the only drawback to their creditable season's campaign being too
much kicking and rowdy ball playing, in the latter of which McGraw was
the principal offender.

#The Records of the New York and Boston Clubs of 1894.#

The New York club's team entered the campaign of 1894 decidedly
handicapped. The club had excellent material at command wherewith to
make up a strong team; but the manager had great difficulty at first in
getting it into team work condition, he being hampered by the
interference of the class of scribe managers of League cities who are
very confident of their ability to run a club team better, on paper,
than the actual manager can on the field. Then, too, a minority of these
journalists seem to delight in getting up sensations which lead to
discord in the ranks of a team; as they have their pet players on the
teams, as well as those they have a special grudge against; moreover,
the directors of the club were at times, in the early part of the
season, not in accord with the manager in his methods of selecting
players, and in appointing them to special positions. Finally the
experience of April and May taught the club officials that if much more
of the interference racket was continued, the result would be a
permanent place in the second division, inasmuch as on May 24th, the
club stood no higher than eighth place, with but little likelihood at
that time of getting any higher. By June, however, an improved condition
of affairs in running the team was manifested; the scribe managers were
ignored, the manager was given more control of the team, and by the
close of the June campaign the New York club was in the first division,
and by the end of July were among the three leaders, where they remained
until the end of the race.

The club was fortunate in being able to make its team unusually strong
in its battery players. The very profitable and liberal investment made
by Director Wheeler, in the purchase of the release of Meekin and
Farrell, was a potent factor in enabling the club to reach the high
position it did, both of these model players, in their respective
positions, proving to be a great accession to the strength of the club's
team. Another valuable acquisition to their team was that noted college
player, young Murphy, he proving to be the most valuable utility man in
the club, and an equal of Ward in team-work batting. By the closing
month of the campaign the team had been trained up to the point of
working together in more harmony, besides doing better team-work in
their batting than any previous players of the club had ever before
exhibited. Moreover, the team, during 1894, manifested greater rallying
power at the finish in a game than ever before, they fully equaling the
Bostons in this respect; in fact, this past season they excelled the
champions in securing the lead in the latter part of a contest, a very
important factor in winning pennants. THE NEW YORK CLUB'S RECORD.

The record of the club for 1894 giving the victories and defeats scored,
with the total of games played, and the percentage of victories against
each club is as follows:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS.                WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
              B         l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              a         a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l         d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
NEW YORK      t    B    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i    o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                           Totals
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     6    6    5    7   10   34    9    8   11    7    7   12   54
Defeats       6    6    7    5   10   26    3    4    1    5    5    0   18
Games Played 12   12   12   12   12   60   12   12   12   12   12   12   72
Per cent. of
 Victories .500 .500 .417 .583 .833 .567 .750 .667 .917 .583 .583 1.00 .750
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The above record shows that the "Giants" defeated Brooklyn and
Washington in the Eastern series of games, and tied with Boston and
Baltimore, they losing to the "Phillies" only. Against the Western clubs
they won every series, excelling both Baltimore and Boston in this
latter respect, as the Baltimores failed to get the best of the
Pittsburghs, and the Bostons were tied with the St. Louis. Then, too,
the "Giants" excelled the other two leading clubs in shutting out
Louisville in no less than thirteen successive games, one game being
thrown out. In addition they took Anson's "Colts" into camp in eleven
out of twelve games, and defeated the Washingtons in ten games out of
the twelve of the series.

The record of the series of games won, lost, tied and unfinished,
together with that of the "Chicago" victories and defeats, and the
single and double figure games of the New York and Boston clubs is as
follows:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.            WESTERN CLUBS.
                     P
                     h
                     i     W           P        C  L
               B     l     a        C  i     S  i  o
               a     a  B  s        l  t     t  n  u
               l     d  r  h        e  t  C  .  c  i
NEW YORK       t  B  e  o  i        v  s  h     i  s
               i  o  l  o  n        e  b  i  L  n  v
vs.            m  s  p  k  g        l  u  c  o  n  i
               o  t  h  l  t        a  r  a  u  a  l
               r  o  i  y  o        n  g  g  i  t  l
               e  n  a  n  n        d  h  o  s  i  e       Grand
                             Totals                 Totals Totals
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won     0  0  0  1  1    2   1  1  1  1  1  1    6    8
Series lost    0  0  1  0  0    1   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    1
Series tied    1  1  0  0  0    2   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    2
Series
 unfinished    0  0  0  0  0    0   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    0
"Chicago"
  victories    1  0  0  0  0    1   1  1  1  1  0  0    4    5
"Chicago"
  defeats      0  2  0  1  0    3   0  0  0  1  0  0    1    4
Single figure
  victories    5  4  2  3  7   21   7  7  8  5  4  7   38   59
Single figure
  defeats      2  4  4  2  1   13   1  1  0  5  5  0   12   25
Double figure
  victories    1  2  3  4  3   13   2  1  3  2  3  5   16   29
Double figure
  defeats      4  2  3  3  1   13   2  3  1  0  0  0    6   19
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The foregoing table shows that the New York club won eight out of the
eleven series, they losing but one--that with Philadelphia -and tieing
two, one with Baltimore and one with Boston. In "Chicago" games they won
five and lost four, and in single figure games they won 59 and lost but
25, while in double figure games they won 29 only and lost but 19.


THE BOSTON CLUB'S RECORD.

The Boston club, in 1894, after being League pennant winners three years
in succession, was obliged to fall back to third place in the past
year's pennant race, after a hard fight for first place in the race from
April to September, that club standing in first place on April 26th and
also on the 29th of August, they varying their position but little
during that period. Hitherto, in the races of 1891, '92 and '93, the
Bostons were noted for their rallying powers, not only in the latter
part of a game, but especially in the closing month of each season. It
will be remembered, that in 1892, though they had to succumb to
Cleveland in the last part of the divided campaign of that year, they
rallied handsomely and easily won the championship in the world's series
of that year. This year, however, they went back on their record badly,
in failing to attend to the rallying business in the last month of the
campaign, the result being that they not only lost the pennant, but had
to submit to being forced into third place in the race. The question as
to "why this was thusly" is not easy to answer. It may be said, for one
thing, that the loss of the valuable services of the veteran Bennett,
was one drawback to their success, and the failure of a majority of
their pitchers, another; their only really successful "battery" team
being Nichols and Ganzel. Then, too, they lost ground in playing, as
well as in popularity, by the kicking and noisy coaching profanities of
a minority of their team; that kind of "hustling" in a team having
become played out as a winning factor in the game in 1894. It must not
be forgotten, however, that the Boston club, in 1894, encountered
stronger teams in New York and Baltimore than ever before; moreover,
they were troubled considerably by the strong opposition of the
St. Louis club's team, the only club to score three straight victories
from them during the season. That the club had the material to do better
than they did, goes without saying; it was a failure in its running that
did the business, chiefly.

Here is the record of the victories, defeats, games played, and
percentage of victories against each club for the past season of 1894:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                 WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
              B         l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              a    N    a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l    e    d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
BOSTON        t    w    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i         l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    o    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    r    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    k    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                           Totals
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     8    6    6    6    9   35    9    8    7    6    8   10   48
Defeats       4    6    6    6    3   25    3    4    5    6    4    2   24
Games Played 12   12   12   12   12   60   12   12   12   12   12   12   72
Per cent. of
 Victories .667 .500 .500 .500 .250 .583 .250 .667 .583 .500 .667 .833 .667
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Bostons, in 1894, took the Baltimore and Washington teams into camp
without difficulty, but the best they could do against New York,
Philadelphia and Brooklyn, was to tie each series. Against the Western
clubs, it will be seen, the only club that troubled them was the
St. Louis Browns. Four series tied out of the eleven they played was an
unusual record for the ex-champions. In victories, they did better
against the West than against the East, by 48 victories to 35; in
defeats, however, the result was more even, viz., 25 to 24.

The following is the club's record of series won, lost, tied and
unfinished, together with the "Chicago" victories and defeats, and the
single and double figure victories and defeats scored by the club in
1894:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        EASTERN CLUBS.       WESTERN CLUBS.
                              P
                              h
                              i     W           P        C  L
                        B     l     a        C  i     S  i  o
                        a  N  a  B  s        l  t     t  n  u
                        l  e  d  r  h        e  t  C  .  c  i
BOSTON                  t  w  e  o  i        v  s  h     i  s
                        i     l  o  n        e  b  i  L  n  v
vs.                     m  Y  p  k  g        l  u  c  o  n  i
                        o  o  h  l  t        a  r  a  u  a  l
                        r  r  i  y  o        n  g  g  i  t l
                        e  k  a  n  n        d  h  o  s  i  e      Grand
                                     Totals                 Totals Totals
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              1  0  0  0  1   2   1  1  1  0  1  1   5     7
Series lost             0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     0
Series tied             0  1  1  1  0   3   0  0  0  1  0  0   1     4
Series unfinished       0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     0
"Chicago" victories     0  2  0  1  0   3   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     3
"Chicago" defeats       0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     0
Single figure victories 4  4  4  3  0  15   2  7  2  0  3  5  19    34
Single figure defeats   1  4  1  3  2  11   1  1  1  5  2  1  11    22
Double figure victories 4  2  2  3  9  20   7  1  5  6  5  5  29    49
Double figure defeats   3  2  5  3  1  14   2  3  4  1  2  1  13    27
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The club won but seven of the eleven series played in 1894, though they
did not lose a series, no less than four being tied. In "Chicago" games
they won but 3, but did not lose a single game by a "shut out."  By way
of comparison, we give below the records of the same three clubs in
1893, when the three leaders in the race were Boston. Pittsburgh and
Cleveland, and the three leaders of the Eastern teams were Boston,
Philadelphia and New York, the Baltimores that year being eighth
only. Singularly enough, all three clubs did better against their
Eastern confreres in 1893 than against the Western clubs.

Here are the three club records of  1893


RECORDS OF 1893.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS.                WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
              B         l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              a    N    a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l    e    d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
BOSTON        t    w    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i         l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    o    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    r    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    k    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories    10    8    8    8    7   41    7    4    8   10    6   10   45
Defeats       2    4    4    4    5   19    5    6    3    2    6    2   24
Games played 12   12   12   12   12   60   12   10   11   12   12   12   72
Per cent. of
 Victories .853 .667 .667 .667 .583 .680 .583 .400 .727 .833 .500 .833 .652
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS.                WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
              B         l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              a         a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l         d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
NEW YORK      t    B    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i    o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     8    4    7    6    7   32    6    4    5    8    6    7   36
Defeats       4    8    5    6    5   28    6    8    7    4    6    5   36
Games played 12   12   12   12   12   60   12   12   12   12   12   12   72
Per cent. of
 Victories .667 .333 .583 .500 .583 .533 .500 .333 .417 .667 .500 .417 .500
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS.            WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
                        l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              N         a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              e         d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
BALTIMORE     w    B    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
                   o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           Y    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              k    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     4    2    5   10    7   28    8    1    5    9    4    5   32
Defeats       8   10    7    2    5   32    4   11    7    3    8    5   38
Games played 12   12   12   12   12   60   12   12   12   12   12   10   70
Per cent. of
 Victories .383 .167 .417 .833 .583 .467 .667 .083 .417 .750 .333 .560 .475
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


To show what the new rivals--the New York and Baltimore clubs--did in
the two past seasons combined, we give the figures of the double records
of 1893 and 1894:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
              B         l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              a         a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l         d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
NEW YORK      t    B    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i    o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories    14   10   12   13   17   66   15   12   16   13   15   19   90
Defeats      10   14   12   11    7   51    9   12    8   11    9    5   54
Games played 24   24   24   24   24  120   24   24   24   24   24   24  144
Per cent. of
 Victories .383 .417 .500 .542 .708 .550 .625 .500 .667 .542 .625 .792 .625
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.            WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P
                        h
                        i         W              P              C    L
                        l         a         C    i         S    i    o
              N         a    B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              e         d    r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
BALTIMORE     w    B    e    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
                   o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           Y    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              k    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories    10    6   11   18   18   63   17    7   14   14   18   15   85
Defeats      14   18   11    6    6   55    7   15   10   10    5    7   54
Games played 24   24   22   24   24  118   24   22   24   24   23   22  139
Per cent. of
 Victories .417 .250 .500 .750 .534 .708 .708 .318 .583 .583 .783 .682 .612
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

In this combined record New York leads Baltimore, the poor season's work
of 1893 by the Baltimores more than offsetting the honors they won in
1894.



#The Campaigns of the Other Nine Clubs of 1894.#


THE PHILADELPHIA CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

At the end of the first day's contests, on April 19th, four clubs were
tied for first place as victors, and four others were tied next in order
as losers, the third four of the twelve clubs of the League not playing
until the 20th of April. At the end of the first week's play in the
April campaign the "Phillies" stood fourth in the race, they being
headed by Boston, Cleveland and St. Louis, respectively, and followed by
Baltimore and Cincinnati, all of which six clubs were in the first
division, the Pittsburgh, New York, Louisville, Washington, Brooklyn and
Chicago following in order in the second division; the difference in
percentage figures between the leader and tail ender being 833 points,
as the Chicago team had not then won a single game out of six played,
and the Brooklyns but one, while the "Phillies" had won 5 out of 7, they
starting off well, Boston, Cleveland and St. Louis having won 5 out of 6
played. By the end of the April campaign the "Phillies" stood in fourth
place, being led by St. Louis, Cleveland and Boston, the other first
division clubs being Baltimore and Cincinnati. During the May campaign
the "Phillies" fluctuated between fifth place on May 9th up to second
position on May 16th, finally finishing the May campaign a poor fifth on
May 31st, with Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Baltimore and Boston in advance of
them, and New York close at their heels. In June the "Phillies" began to
do a little better, and by June 18th, they had pulled up to second
place, with Baltimore in the van and Boston close behind the "Quakers."
Then once more they fell back in the race, the close of the June
campaign seeing them in fifth place, and in the rear of Baltimore,
Boston, Brooklyn and Pittsburgh, with New York within a few points of
them. During July this "up-hill and down-dale" method of racing was
continued until July 23d, when they were driven into the ranks of the
second division clubs, they occupying seventh place on that date, the
end of the July campaign seeing the team in seventh place, with a
percentage of victories of .526, Boston, Baltimore, New York, Cleveland,
Brooklyn and Pittsburgh being the six first division clubs. During the
August campaign the "Phillies" got back into the first division ranks,
and on the 21st of that month were in fourth place, which position they
retained to the end of that month's campaign. They tried in vain to get
higher, but could not do so, and on the last day of the season they
stood a bad fourth, the next club above them leading them by 75 points
in percentage figures, and by eleven games.

The following is the Philadelphia club's record of victories and defeats
scored, with the total number of games played, and the percentage of
victories against each club, and also the record of the series won,
lost, tied and unfinished, together with the "Chicago" victories and
defeats, and the single and double figure victories and defeats scored
by the club during 1894:


THE PHILADELPHIA CLUB'S RECORD.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS.                WESTERN CLUBS.
                                  W              P              C    L
              B                   a         C    i         S    i    o
              a    N         B    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l    e         r    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
PHILADELPHIA  t    w    B    o    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i         o    o    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    k    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    o    t    l    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    r    o    y    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    k    n    n    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     4    7    6    7    8   32    5    8    5    5    8    8   39
Defeats       6    5    6    5    4   26    7    4    7    7    2    3   30
Games played 10   12   12   12   12   58   12   12   12   12   10   11   69
Per cent. of
 Victories .400 .583 .500 .583 .667 .552 .417 .667 .417 .417 .800 .727 .585
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      EASTERN CLUBS.       WESTERN CLUBS.

                                    W           P        C  L
                        B           a        C  i     S  i  o
                        a  N     B  s        l  t     t  n  u
                        l  e     r  h        e  t  C  .  c  i
PHILADELPHIA            t  w  B  o  i        v  s  h     i  s
                        i     o  o  n        e  b  i  L  n  v
vs.                     m  Y  s  k  g        l  u  c  o  n  i
                        o  o  t  l  t        a  r  a  u  a  l
                        r  r  o  y  o        n  g  g  i  t  l
                        e  k  n  n  n        d  h  o  s  i  e      Grand
                                     Totals                 Totals Totals
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  1  0  1  1   3   0  1  0  0  1  1   3     6
Series lost             0  0  0  0  0   0   1  0  1  1  0  0   3     3
Series tied             0  0  1  0  0   1   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     1
Series unfinished       1  0  0  0  0   1   0  0  0  0  1  1   2     3
"Chicago" victories     0  0  0  0  0   0   1  1  0  0  0  1   3     3
"Chicago" defeats       0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     0
Single figure victories 2  4  3  3  3  15   3  3  1  2  2  2  13    28
Single figure defeats   2  2  5  5  3  12   2  3  0  3  3  0  10    22
Double figure victories 2  3  3  4  5  17   2  5  4  3  6  6  26    43
Double figure defeats   4  3  1  0  1   8   5  1  7  4  2  3  22    30
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The above table shows that the Philadelphia team in their games with
their Eastern opponents had but little difficulty in defeating the
Washingtons, besides getting the best of both New York and Brooklyn in
the race. But they lost to Baltimore and tied with Boston. With the
Western teams they did not do so well, as they only won three out of the
six series, they winning easily with Cincinnati by 8 to 2 in won games,
while they had but little difficulty with Louisville and Pittsburgh.
They lost with Cleveland, Chicago and St. Louis by 5 to 7 each in won
games.



THE BROOKLYN CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Brooklyn club opened the season's campaign on April 19th, and at the
close of the first day's play, stood tied with Baltimore, Philadelphia
and Pittsburgh for fifth place, they standing as low as eleventh
position on April 23d. During the May campaign they made but little
headway in the race, as, up to May 22d they had got no higher than
seventh place. After that they got into the first division for a few
days, but at the end of the May campaign they were tied with New York
for sixth place; Pittsburgh, on May 31st, being in the van, with
Cleveland and Baltimore second and third, Pittsburgh's percentage
figures being .710 at this date; the "Orioles" being followed by Boston
and Philadelphia. The Brooklyns began the June campaign by leading New
York and taking up a position in the first division, occupying sixth
place, next to Boston, then in fifth position. By June 19th they had
reached fourth place, and they closed their June campaign in third
position, Baltimore leading, with Boston second. During the early part
of July the Brooklyns fell back to sixth place, and the "Giants" jumped
into third position. On July 31st the Brooklyns stood fifth only, and
they began falling lower the first week in August, and on the fourth of
that month were back in the second division ranks, and after that date
"the subsequent proceedings interested them no more," as far as the
three leading positions were concerned. They remained in seventh place
up to August 21st when they got back into the first division, and on
August 31st they were in fifth place. During September there was a close
fight between Cleveland and Brooklyn for that position, but finally the
Brooklyns retained it at the finish by the percentage figures of .534 to
.527, a lead of but seven points. The Brooklyn team made but a poor
record against their Eastern team rivals in 1894, but were more
successful against the Western clubs. They won but one series in the
East, and that was against the tail-end Washingtons, Baltimore, New York
and Philadelphia beating them out in the race, while they tied the
Bostons. Against the Western clubs they won in three series; tied with
two others, and had the series with Cleveland, but they only won four
series out of the eleven.

The following tables show the Brooklyn club's record of victories and
defeats scored, with the total number of games played and the percentage
of victories against each club; also, the record of the series won,
lost, tied and unfinished, together with the "Chicago" victories and
defeats, and the single and double figure victories and defeats scored
by the club during the season of 1894:


THE BROOKLYN CLUB'S RECORD.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i    W              P              C    L
              B              l    a         C    i         S    i    o
              a    N         a    s         l    t         t    n    u
              l    e         d    h         e    t    C    .    c    i
BROOKLYN      t    w    B    e    i         v    s    h         i    s
              i         o    l    n         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    g         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    o    t    h    t         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    r    o    i    o         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    k    n    a    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     4    5    6    5    9   29    6    7    6    8    6    8   41
Defeats       8    7    6    7    3   31    5    5    6    4    6    4   30
Games Played 12   12   12   12   12   60   11   12   12   12   12   12   71
Per cent. of
 Victories .388 .417 .500 .452 .750 .483 .545 .583 .500 .667 .509 .667 .577
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       EASTERN CLUBS       WESTERN CLUBS
                                  P
                                  h
                                  i  W          P        C  L
                         B        l  a       C  i     S  i  o
                         a  N     a  s       l  t     t  n  u
                         l  e     d  h       e  t  C  .  c  i
BROOKLYN                 t  w  B  e  i       v  s  h     i  s
                         i     o  l  n       e  b  i  L  n  v
 vs.                     m  Y  s  p  g       l  u  c  o  n  i
                         o  o  t  h  t       a  r  a  u  a  l
                         r  r  o  i  o       n  g  g  i  t  l
                         e  k  n  a  n       d  h  o  s  i  e       Grand
                                       Total                  Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won               0  0  0  0  1   1   0  1  0  1  0  1   3     4
Series lost              1  1  0  1  0   3   0  0  0  0  0  0   0     3
Series tied              0  0  1  0  0   1   0  0  1  0  1  0   2     3
Series unfinished        0  0  0  0  0   0   1  0  0  0  0  0   1     1
"Chicago" victories      0  1  0  0  0   1   0  0  2  0  0  0   2     3
"Chicago" defeats        0  0  1  0  0   1   1  0  0  1  0  0   2     3
Single figure victories  1  2  3  5  3  14   4  3  5  3  1  4  20    34
Single figure defeats    3  3  4  3  1  14   2  2  2  3  3  1  13    27
Double figure victories  3  3  3  0  6  15   2  4  1  5  5  4  21    36
Double figure defeats    5  4  2  4  2  17   3  3  4  1  3  3  18    35
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE CLEVELAND CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Cleveland club did not begin their opening campaign until April
20th, and then in the ranks of the second division; but they soon,
jumped to the front, and by the end of the April campaign they stood a
tie for first place with Boston and St. Louis, with the percentage
figures of .750 each. They opened the May campaign by pushing Boston out
of first place, and they retained the leading position from May 2d to
the 28th, they reaching the high percentage of .867 on May 10th--the
highest of the season. On Decoration Day Pittsburgh went to the front,
with the percentage of .700 to Cleveland's .692, and they retained that
position to the close of the May campaign. During June the Clevelands
fell off, and by the 21st of that month they had got down to fifth place
in the race, and by the end of the June campaign had been driven into
the ranks of the second division, they then occupying seventh place with
a percentage of .549; Pittsburgh, on June 30th, being the only Western
team in the first division. This fact alone showed a one-sided race up
to that date.

The Clevelands did not get back into the first division until July 17th,
and after that they never left it. During August they battled well for
third place, but could get no higher than fourth position, where they
stood up to August 21st, when they began to fall off, and on August 31st
they were down to sixth place. This position they were forced to keep
all through September up to the finish of the race.

The Cleveland team managed to win two of their series with the Eastern
clubs, viz., with Washington and Philadelphia, but were badly whipped by
the three leaders; they managed, however, to make a close fight of it
with their old antagonists of Brooklyn, the latter winning the series by
a single game only.

With their Western rivals the Clevelands won every series but one, viz.,
that with the Pittsburgh club, thereby winning the _championship of the
West for_ 1894, as Boston did the championship of the East. Then, too,
the Clevelands were the only Western club remaining in the first
division at the close of the season; so they had some consolation in the
race in excelling their Western rivals, all of whom they beat out in the
race, even if they failed to win the pennant or to get among the three
leaders in the race. Moreover, they excelled all the Western teams in
team work in the field and at the bat, as they did the Brooklyns and
Washingtons of the Eastern division.

Here is their record:

THE CLEVELAND CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i         W         P              C    L
              B              l         a         i         S    i    o
              a    N         a    B    s         t         t    n    u
              l    e         d    r    h         t    C    .    c    i
CLEVELAND     t    w    B    e    o    i         s    h         i    s
              i         o    l    o    n         b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k    g         u    c    o    n    i
              o    o    t    h    l    t         r    a    u    a    l
              r    r    o    i    y    o         g    g    i    t    l
              e    k    n    a    n    n         h    o    s    i    e
                                         Totals                       Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     3    3    3    7    5    8   29    4   10    9    8    8   39
Defeats       9    9    9    5    6    4   42    8    2    3    3    3   19
Games Played 12   12   12   12   11   12   71   12   12   12   11   11   58
Per cent. of
 Victories .250 .250 .250 .583 .455 .667 .408 .333 .883 .750 .727 .727 .672
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       EASTERN CLUBS         WESTERN CLUBS.
                                 P
                                 h
                                 i     W       P        C  L
                        B        l     a       i     S  i  o
                        a  N     a  B  s       t     t  n  u
                        l  e     d  r  h       t  C  .  c  i
CLEVELAND               t  w  B  e  o  i       s  h     i  s
                        i     o  l  o  n       b  i  L  n  v
vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k  g       u  c  o  n  i
                        o  o  t  h  l  t       r  a  u  a  l
                        r  r  o  i  y  o       g  g  i  t  l
                        e  k  n  a  n  n       h  o  s  i  e       Grand
                                         Total               Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  0  0  1  0  1   2   0  1  1  1  1   4     6
Series lost             1  1  1  0  0  0   3   1  0  0  0  0   1     4
Series tied             0  0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0   0     0
Series unfinished       0  0  0  0  1  0   1   0  0  0  1  1   2     3
"Chicago" victories     0  0  0  0  1  1   2   0  0  3  1  1   5     7
"Chicago" defeats       0  1  0  1  0  0   2   1  0  0  0  0   1     3
Single figure victories 1  1  1  2  3  4  12   3  7  7  4  6  27    39
Single figure defeats   6  7  2  3  4  4  26   5  1  1  2  1  10    36
Double figure victories 2  2  2  5  2  4  17   1  3  2  4  2  12    29
Double figure defeats   3  2  7  2  2  0  16   3  1  2  1  2   9    25
---------------------------------------------------------------------------




#The Second Division Clubs.#


THE PITTSBURGH CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Pittsburgh club opened the April campaign in the ranks of the second
division, the end of the month seeing the team in seventh place, three
other Western teams leading them on April 30th. During May they got into
the first division, and May 21st they were among the three leaders, with
Cleveland and Baltimore first and second in the race. At the end of the
May campaign they had rallied as well, and had pulled up to first place,
with the percentage figures of .710 to Cleveland's .679 and Baltimore's
.654, Boston, Philadelphia and New York being the next three. In June,
the Pittsburghs fell off in the race, and by the 11th of that month they
were down to fifth place, then pulled up again after touching sixth
position, and on June 30th stood fourth, they then being headed by
Baltimore, Boston and Brooklyn, with Philadelphia and New York in their
rear. In July they fell off badly, and on the 20th of that month they
had been driven out of the first division. At the end of the July
campaign they stood sixth in the race. They got a step higher the early
part of August, but the end of that month's campaign saw the club once
more in the ranks of the second division, and they struggled in vain to
get out of the company of the six tail-enders, the end of the race
seeing the club in seventh place with the percentage figures of .500,
Cleveland leading them by 27 points.

The record of the Pittsburgh club for 1894 giving the victories and
defeats scored, with a total of games played and the percentage of
victories against each club; also, the record of the series of games
won, lost, tied or unfinished, together with that of the "Chicago"
victories and defeats, and the single and double figure games scored by
the club, is as follows:

THE PITTSBURGH CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i         W                       C    L
              B              l         a        C         S    i    o
              a    N         a    B    s        l         t    n    u
              l    e         d    r    h        e    C    .    c    i
PITTSBURGH    t    w    B    e    o    i        v    h         i    s
              i         o    l    o    n        e    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k    g        l    c    o    n    i
              o    o    t    h    l    t        a    a    u    a    l
              r    r    o    i    y    o        n    g    i    t    l
              e    k    n    a    n    n        d    o    s    i    e
                                         Totals                       Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     4    4    4    4    5    8   29   8    6    6    7    9    36
Defeats       6    8    8    8    7    4   41   4    6    6    5    3    24
Games played 10   12   12   12   12   12   70  12   12   12   12   12    60
Per cent. of
 Victories .400 .333 .333 .333 .417 .667 .414 .667 .500 .500 .500 .583 .600
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       EASTERN CLUBS         WESTERN CLUBS.
                                 P
                                 h
                                 i     W                C  L
                        B        l     a       C     S  i  o
                        a  N     a  B  s       l     t  n  u
                        l  e     d  r  h       e  C  .  c  i
PITTSBURGH              t  w  B  e  o  i       v  h     i  s
                        i     o  l  o  n       e  i  L  n  v
vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k  g       l  c  o  n  i
                        o  o  t  h  l  t       a  a  u  a  l
                        r  r  o  i  y  o       n  g  i  t  l
                        e  k  n  a  n  n       d  o  s  i  e       Grand
                                         Total               Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  0  0  0  0  1   1   1  0  0  1  1    3    4
Series lost             0  1  1  1  1  0   4   .  0  0  0  0    0    4
Series tied             0  0  0  0  0  0   0   .  1  1  0  0    2    2
Series unfinished       1  0  0  0  0  0   1   .  0  0  0  0    0    1
"Chicago" victories     0  0  0  0  0  0   0   1  1  0  0  0    2    2
"Chicago" defeats       0  1  0  1  0  0   2   .  0  0  0  0    2    2
Single figure victories 3  1  1  3  2  3  13   5  3  4  3  7   22   35
Single figure defeats   1  7  7  3  3  0  21   3  2  4  2  3   14   35
Double figure victories 1  3  3  1  3  5  16   3  3  2  4  2   14   30
Double figure defeats   5  1  1  5  4  4  20   1  4  2  3  0   10   20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The "Pirates," it will be seen, were very unsuccessful against the
Eastern teams, the Washingtons being the only club they could win a
series from. Against their Western rivals, however, they did not lose a
series, defeating Cleveland, Cincinnati and Louisville, and tieing with
Chicago and St. Louis. The very club they wanted most to defeat they
captured, viz., the Clevelands; that, and the fact that they led the
second division clubs being the only consolation they had.



THE CHICAGO CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

Never before in the history of the Chicago club had any of its teams
ever started a pennant race so badly as did the Chicago "Colts" in
1894. They finished the April campaign with the unenviable record of
eight defeats out of nine games played, they then being a bad tail-ender
in the race, with the poor percentage figures of .111 only. They
remained in the last ditch up to May 10th, by which date they had won
but two games out of thirteen played, the result being costly to the
club in poor gate receipts. The next day they pushed the Washingtons
into the last ditch--their home place for years--and by May 14th had got
up to tenth position. But the end of May saw the "Colts" no higher in
the race record than eleventh place, just on the ragged edge of the last
ditch. By the end of the June campaign they had pulled up a little, they
were standing in tenth place on June 30th; there they remained until the
last day of the July campaign, when they managed to get into ninth
place. During August they rallied for the first time in the race, and by
the end of that month's campaign they stood eighth. But they could not
get higher in the race, and they had to be content with eighth position
at the end of the season, their poor record including that of being the
only club of the twelve which had not, at one time or another, occupied
a place in the ranks of the first division clubs. It was the worst
season's record known in the history of the Chicago club.

Here is the club record:

THE CHICAGO CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i         W              P         C    L
              B              l         a         C    i    S    i    o
              a    N         a    B    s         l    t    t    n    u
              l    e         d    r    h         e    t    .    c    i
CHICAGO       t    w    B    e    o    i         v    s         i    s
              i         o    l    o    n         e    b    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k    g         l    u    o    n    i
              o    o    t    h    l    t         a    r    u    a    l
              r    r    o    i    y    o         n    g    i    t    l
              e    k    n    a    n    n         d    h    s    i    e
                                         Totals                       Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     3    1    5    7    6    7   29    2    6    6    6    8   28
Defeats       9   11    7    5    6    5   43   10    6    6    6    4   32
Games played 12   12   12   12   12   12   60   12   12   12   12   12   60
Per cent. of
 Victories .250 .083 .417 .583 .500 .583 .403 .375 .500 .500 .500 .667 .467
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       EASTERN CLUBS         WESTERN CLUBS.
                                 P
                                 h
                                 i     W          P     C  L
                        B        l     a       C  i  S  i  o
                        a  N     a  B  s       l  t  t  n  u
                        l  e     d  r  h       e  t  .  c  i
CHICAGO                 t  w  B  e  o  i       v  s     i  s
                        i     o  l  o  n       e  b  L  n  v
vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k  g       l  u  o  n  i
                        o  o  t  h  l  t       a  r  u  a  l
                        r  r  o  i  y  o       n  g  i  t  l
                        e  k  n  a  n  n       d  h  s  i  e       Grand
                                         Total               Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  0  0  1  0  1   2   0  0  0  0  1   1     3
Series lost             1  1  1  0  0  0   3   1  0  0  0  0   1     4
Series tied             0  0  0  0  1  0   1  ..  1  1  1  0   3     4
Series unfinished       0  0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0   0     0
"Chicago" victories     0  0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0   0     0
"Chicago" defeats       0  1  0  0  2  0   3   0  1  0  1  0   2     5
Single figure victories 1  1  1  0  2  1   6   1  2  3  2  6  14    20
Single figure defeats   2  8  2  1  5  4  22   6  3  4  2  3  18    40
Double figure victories 2  1  4  7  4  6  24   1  4  3  4  2  14    38
Double figure defeats   7  3  5  4  1  1  21   4  3  2  4  1  14    35
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Chicago "Colts" won two series against the Eastern teams, viz.,
those with the Washingtons and the Philadelphias, and they had a tie
series with Brooklyn and a close fight with Boston; but the New Yorks
whipped them the worst any club had ever before succeeded in doing in a
season's series, as the "Giants" won eleven out of twelve games; the
Baltimores, too, had an easy task in winning against the
"Colts". Against their Western rivals, however, they lost but one
series, viz., that with Cleveland; but they only won one series--that
with Louisville--they tieing Pittsburgh, St. Louis and Cincinnati.



THE ST. LOUIS CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The St. Louis club opened the April campaign among the leaders, and put
up their stock to a premium, by ending the month's record tied with
Boston and Cleveland for first place, each with a percentage of .750,
the club's special rival--Comiskey's Cincinnati "Reds"--ending the April
campaign tied with Baltimore for fifth place. After this April spurt in
the race, however, the "Browns" began to fall back in their record
during May, and by the 7th of that month were down to sixth position,
and on May 14th they had to give way to Cincinnati, they then falling
back into the second division ranks; and on the 17th of May they were
down to ninth place, and then the best they could do during the last
week of the May campaign was to end eighth in the race on May
31st. During June they tried to get back into the first division, but
they failed to reach higher than seventh position. During July they got
lower down in the ranks of the second division, and they ended that
month's campaign as low as tenth place, and they were kept there until
the very last day of the season, when two victories over the
Washingtons, with a tie game between Cincinnati and Cleveland, enabled
the "Browns" to win the consolation prize, viz., leading Cincinnati at
the finish, by the percentage figures of .424 to .419, the St. Louis
team ending in ninth place and the Cincinnatis in tenth position.

The record of the St. Louis club for 1894 giving the victories and
defeats scored, with the total of games played and the percentage of
victories against each club; also, the record of the series of games
won, lost, tied and unfinished, together with that of the "Chicago"
victories and defeats and the single and double figure victories and
defeats scored by the club, is as follows:

THE ST. LOUIS CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i         W              P         C    L
              B              l         a         C    i         i    o
              a    N         a    B    s         l    t         n    u
              l    e         d    r    h         e    t    C    c    i
ST .LOUIS     t    w    B    e    o    i         v    s    h    i    s
              i         o    l    o    n         e    b    i    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    n    i
              o    o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    a    l
              r    r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    t    l
              e    k    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    i    e
                                         Totals                       Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     2    5    6    7    4    6   30    3    6    6    5    6   26
Defeats      10    7    6    5    8    6   42    9    6    6    7    6   34
Games played 12   12   12   12   12   12   72   12   12   12   12   12   69
Per cent. of
 Victories .167 .417 .500 .583 .333 .500 .417 .250 .500 .500 .417 .500 .433
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       EASTERN CLUBS         WESTERN CLUBS.
                                 P
                                 h
                                 i     W           P     C  L
                        B        l     a        C  i     i  o
                        a  N     a  B  s        l  t     n  u
                        l  e     d  r  h        e  t  C  c  i
ST. LOUIS               t  w  B  e  o  i        v  s  h  i  s
                        i     o  l  o  n        e  b  i  n  v
vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k  g        l  u  c  n  i
                        o  o  t  h  l  t        a  r  a  a  l
                        r  r  o  i  y  o        n  g  g  t  l
                        e  k  n  a  n  n        d  h  o  i  e      Grand
                                         Total               Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  0  0  1  0  0    1   0  0  0  0  0   1    2
Series lost             1  1  0  0  1  0    3   1  0  0  1  0   2    5
Series tied             0  0  1  0  0  1    2   0  1  1  0  1   3    5
Series unfinished       0  0  0  0  0  0    0   0  0  0  0  0   0    0
"Chicago" victories     0  1  0  0  1  0    2   0  0  0  0  0   0    2
"Chicago" defeats       0  1  0  0  0  0    1   3  0  0  1  0   4    5
Single figure victories 0  5  5  3  3  2   18   1  4  4  4  4  17   35
Single figure defeats   7  5  0  2  3  3   20   7  4  3  5  6  25   45
Double figure victories 2  0  1  4  1  4   12   2  2  2  1  2   9   21
Double figure defeats     3  2  6  3  5  3   22   2  2  3  2  0   9   31
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The St. Louis "Browns" did well in winning one of their Eastern
series--that with Philadelphia--and tieing with Boston and
Washington. But the Baltimores gave them a bad whipping, and the
Brooklyns and "Phillies" took them into camp easily. Against their
Western adversaries, however, they failed to win a single series; but
they only lost one--that with Cleveland--as they tied with Pittsburgh,
Chicago and Louisville.



THE CINCINNATI CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Cincinnati club did not begin their opening campaign until April
20th, and during that month's short campaign they occupied third place
on April 24th, and retained their position among the leaders to the end
of the month. In May, however, they fell back into the ranks of the
second division clubs, and remained there until May 16th, when they
occupied sixth place in the first division. By the end of that month,
however, they had been pushed back to ninth position. There they
remained during the whole of the June campaign. During July they
improved their position by getting into eighth position, where they
stood on July 31st. August's campaign did not improve their standing; on
the contrary, they fell back into ninth place, where they stood on
August 31st. During September they were almost anchored in that
position, but on the very last day of the race they let their old
rivals, the "Browns," beat them out, and Comiskey had to finish tenth in
the race, and then he said he'd had enough, and he concluded to "go
West," where he will remain for 1895.

Here is the Cincinnati club's record:

THE CINCINNATI CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i         W              P              L
              B              l         a         C    i              o
              a    N         a    B    s         l    t         S    u
              l    e         d    r    h         e    t    C    t    i
CINCINNATI    t    w    B    e    o    i         v    s    h    .    s
              i         o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    i
              o    o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    l
              r    r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    l
              e    k    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    e
                                         Totals                       Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     2    5    4    2    6    7   26    3    5    6    7    7   28
Defeats      10    7    8    8    6    5   44    8    7    6    5    5   31
Games played 12   12   12   10   12   12   70   11   12   12   12   12   59
Per cent. of
 Victories .167 .417 .338 .200 .500 .583 .371 .273 .417 .500 .583 .588 .475
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      EASTERN CLUBS          WESTERN CLUBS.
                                 P
                                 h
                                 i     W           P        L
                        B        l     a        C  i        o
                        a  N     a  B  s        l  t     S  u
                        l  e     d  r  h        e  t  C  t  i
CINCINNATI              t  w  B  e  o  i        v  s  h  .  s
                        i     o  l  o  n        e  b  i  L  v
vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k  g        l  u  c  o  i
                        o  o  t  h  l  t        a  r  a  u  l
                        r  r  o  i  y  o        n  g  g  i  l
                        e  k  n  a  n  n        d  h  o  s  e      Grand
                                         Total               Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  0  0  0  0  1    1   0  0  0  1  1   2    3
Series lost             1  1  1  1  0  1    5   1  1  0  0  0   2    7
Series tied             0  0  0  0  1  0    1   0  0  1  0  0   1    2
Series unfinished       0  0  0  1  0  0    1   1  0  0  0  0   1    2
"Chicago" victories     0  0  0  0  0  1    1   0  0  1  1  1   3    4
"Chicago" defeats       0  0  0  0  0  0    0   1  0  0  0  1   2    2
Single figure victories 1  5  2  3  3  5   19   2  2  2  5  6  17   36
Single figure defeats   4  4  3  2  1  5   19   4  3  2  4  5  18   37
Double figure victories 1  0  2  1  3  2    9   1  3  4  2  1  11   20
Double figure defeats   6  3  5  6  5  0   25   4  4  4  1  0  13   38
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE WASHINGTON CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The season of 1894 was made noteworthy in the annals of the Washington
club, owing to their being able to pay off their six years' mortgage on
the last ditch, and transferred it to the Louisville club. The
"Senators" opened the season in a very lively style, inasmuch as they
stood a tie for first place at the end of the first day of the campaign,
and had the credit of winning their first games with the "Phillies," the
New York and Boston clubs. After this dash at the start they settled
down among the second division clubs for the season, resigned to
everything but the fate of again being tail-enders. Chicago kept them
out until May, when the "Senators" fell into their old quarters, the
tail-end place, where they remained until August 23d, when, to the great
joy of Manager Schmelz, they had a wrestle with Louisville and threw the
"Colonels" into the last ditch.

Here is their record:

THE WASHINGTON CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i                   P              C    L
              B              l              C    i         S    i    o
              a    N         a    B         l    t         t    n    u
              l    e         d    r         e    t    C    .    c    i
WASHINGTON    t    w    B    e    o         v    s    h         i    s
              i         o    l    o         e    b    i    L    n    v
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k         l    u    c    o    n    i
              o    o    t    h    l         a    r    a    u    a    l
              r    r    o    i    y         n    g    g    i    t    l
              e    k    n    a    n         d    h    o    s    i    e
                                    Totals                            Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     1    2    3    4    3   13    4    4    5    6    5    8   32
Defeats      11   10    9    8    9   47    8    8    7    6    7    4   40
Games played 12   12   12   12   12   60   12   12   12   12   12   12   72
Per cent. of
 Victories .083 .167 .250 .333 .250 .217 .333 .333 .417 .500 .147 .667 .444
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       EASTERN CLUBS       WESTERN CLUBS
                                  P
                                  h
                                  i             P        C  L
                         B        l          C  i     S  i  o
                         a  N     a  B       l  t     t  n  u
                         l  e     d  r       e  t  C  .  c  i
WASHINGTON               t  w  B  e  o       v  s  h     i  s
                         i     o  l  o       e  b  i  L  n  v
 vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k       l  u  c  o  n  i
                         o  o  t  h  l       a  r  a  u  a  l
                         r  r  o  i  y       n  g  g  i  t  l
                         e  k  n  a  n       d  h  o  s  i  e       Grand
                                       Total                  Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won               0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  1    1    1
Series lost              1  1  1  1  1   5   1  1  1  0  1  0    4    9
Series tied              0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  1  0  0    1    1
Series unfinished        0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    0
"Chicago" victories      0  0  0  0  0   0   0  0  0  0  0  0    0    0
"Chicago" defeats        1  0  0  0  0   1   1  0  0  0  1  0    2    3
Single figure victories  0  1  2  3  1   7   4  0  4  3  5  5   21   28
Single figure defeats    3  7  0  3  3  16   4  3  1  2  5  3   18   34
Double figure victories  1  1  1  1  2   6   0  4  1  3  0  3   11   17
Double figure defeats    8  3  9  5  6  31   4  5  6  4  2  1   22   53
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The "Senators" won but one series in the whole campaign, and that was
with the Louisvilles. They managed to tie with the St. Louis "Browns,"
but all the rest knocked them out--the Baltimores by 11 to 1.



THE LOUISVILLE CLUB'S CAMPAIGN.

The Louisville club started in the race with better prospects than they
had for years past, they being tied for first place on April 20th, but
they only remained in the first division a few days, after which they
took up their home position among the tail-enders, which they occupied
from April 30th to September 30th, never once getting back to the ranks
of the first division. Gradually, during the May campaign they worked
their way down towards the last ditch, they having a close fight for the
ditch with Washington during June. But July saw them rolled into the
tail-end position, and there they remained until the ending of the
championship campaign. The Louisvilles had the consolation of tieing the
the St. Louis "Browns" in their series, and of "Chicagoing" the Boston
champions, and also in defeating them in another game by 11 to 1. Here
is their record:

THE   LOUISVILLE   CLUB'S   RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            EASTERN CLUBS.                     WESTERN CLUBS.
                             P
                             h
                             i         W              P              C
              B              l         a         C    i              i
              a    N         a    B    s         l    t         S    n
              l    e         d    r    h         e    t    C    t    c
LOUISVILLE    t    w    B    e    o    i         v    s    h    .    i
              i         o    l    o    n         e    b    i    L    n
vs.           m    Y    s    p    k    g         l    u    c    o    n
              o    o    t    h    l    t         a    r    a    u    a
              r    r    o    i    y    o         n    g    g    i    t
              e    k    n    a    n    n         d    h    o    s    i
                                         Totals                       Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Victories     2    0    2    3    4    4   15    3    3    4    6    5   21
Defeats      10   12   10    8    8    8   56    8    9    8    6    7   38
Games played 12   12   12   11   12   12   71   11   12   12   12   12   59
Per cent. of
 Victories .167 .000 .167 .273 .333 .333 .211 .273 .250 .333 .500 .417 .356
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      EASTERN CLUBS          WESTERN CLUBS.
                                 P
                                 h
                                 i     W           P        C
                        B        l     a        C  i        i
                        a  N     a  B  s        l  t     S  n
                        l  e     d  r  h        e  t  C  t  c
LOUISVILLE              t  w  B  e  o  i        v  s  h  .  i
                        i     o  l  o  n        e  b  i  L  n
vs.                     m  Y  s  p  k  g        l  u  c  o  n
                        o  o  t  h  l  t        a  r  a  u  a
                        r  r  o  i  y  o        n  g  g  i  t
                        e  k  n  a  n  n        d  h  o  s  i      Grand
                                         Total               Total Total
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Series won              0  0  0  0  0  0   0    0  0  0  0  0   0    0
Series lost             1  1  1  1  1  1   6    1  1  1  0  1   4   10
Series tied             0  0  0  0  0  0   0    0  0  0  1  0   1    1
Series unfinished       0  0  0  1  0  0   0    1  0  0  0  0   1    2
"Chicago" victories     1  0  0  0  0  0   1    0  0  0  0  1   1    2
"Chicago" defeats       0  0  0  1  0  0   1    1  0  0  0  1   2    3
Single figure victories 1  0  1  0  1  3   6    1  3  3  6  5  18   24
Single figure defeats   8  8  5  2  4  5  32    6  7  6  4  6  29   61
Double figure victories 1  0  1  3  3  1   9    2  0  1  0  0   3   12
Double figure defeats   2  5  5  6  4  3  25    2  2  2  2  1   9   34
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The nearest the Louisvilles came to a series victory was in their series
with the St. Louis club, which they tied; all the others they lost, they
being "shut out" by the "Giants," with which club they lost thirteen
successive games, one of which was thrown out. The Club Management of
1894.

The management of the twelve League clubs in 1894 was, in but few
instances, in advance of that of 1893; and in a minority of cases it was
worse. The experience of the past season in the management of club
teams, points out the indisputable fact that the majority of managers
are blind to the folly of condoning drinking offences in the ranks, for
one thing, and equally ignorant of the damaging effects, in lessening
the reputable patronage of their grounds, of countenancing that phase of
"hoodlumism" in teams known as "kicking against the decisions of
umpires." Despite of the costly experience of the past five years in the
countenancing of drunkards in the League ranks, we see, this season of
1895, club teams including players notorious for their old drunken
habits. Why managers cannot perceive the folly of re-engaging such men
is a mystery. No matter what their skill at the bat or in the field may
be, their drinking habits, with the demoralizing effect on the teams at
large which follows, more than offset the advantage of their alleged
ability in the field. Despite this obvious fact, however, club
officials--either presidents, directors or managers--still blunder on in
having these drunkards on their teams, even after condoning their
offences time and again, on the promise of reform, which in no single
instance has ever taken place that I am aware of. But surpassing this
folly, is that of engaging ugly and vicious tempered players for their
teams, who are simply demoralizing agents in any team on which they are
engaged. These ill-tempered fellows are not only death to necessary
discipline, but they are sure to find occasions to form cliques in a
team, which war against the best interests of the club at large, and are
obnoxious in the extreme to the pennant winning rule of _playing for the
side_, a rule as important to the success of a club team in a pennant
race, as the reserve rule is to the life of the professional club
business at large. Bad management of clubs involves a variety of
blunders, not only in the running of the team without regard to business
principles--sadly neglected by a majority of the League clubs in
1894--but especially in the making up of teams in the spring months, in
which one blunder is conspicuous, viz., that of selecting players for
each team without regard to their ability to play in _harmony together_,
but solely by the records made in the unreliable table of averages of
the past season, in which everything in the way of scoring figures tends
to aid the mere record player and throws obstacles in the way of team
work players' records. Another managerial blunder is shown in the
gathering together of a long list of signed players, with the view of
selecting a strong team of a dozen players from the crowd for the
serious work of the campaign. For instance, in the makeup of many of the
League teams of 1894, the blunder of getting together six or eight
pitchers and occupying the whole of the early part of the season's
campaign in experiments with them was positive folly. It has never paid
in a single instance. It was, in fact, death to the success of at least
four League teams last season, Cincinnati in particular. Many of last
year's team managers failed to realize the important fact that in
testing the merits of pitchers in the spring season they need to be
given a fair trial, and not dismiss them after the hasty judgment of
their ability of a few games of trial. Pitchers need to be thoroughly
tested before they are released, after engagement, and this testing
process cannot at the shortest be done in less than a month's trial. No
pitcher can do his best while in doubt all the while as to the result of
a single day's play on his engagement. Five pitchers are amply
sufficient to begin a season with, and at most three catchers. But one
of the greatest and most costly blunders in team management made in 1894
was that of encouraging "hoodlumism" by the countenancing of blackguard
kicking, in defiance of the laws of the game, which presidents and
directors, as well as managers and captains, were alike guilty of to a
more or less extent. The rules of the game positively prohibit any
player of a nine on the field from disputing any decision of the umpire
except the captain, and he only in certain exceptional cases, and yet
not only did captains of teams allow this rule to be violated in every
game of the season, but they were openly countenanced in it by not only
their managers, but in many cases by club presidents and
directors. Under such circumstances is it any wonder that the season of
1894 stands on record as being marked by more disgraceful kicking, rowdy
play, blackguard language and brutal play than that of any season since
the League was organized? And all this was the result of a neglect of
business principles in club management, and in the blunders in managing
teams committed by incompetent managers and captains--an arraignment of
the National League which we hope never to have to record again.



THE   MONTHLY   CAMPAIGNS.


THE APRIL CAMPAIGN.

The short April campaign of 1894 began on April 19th, on which date
eight of the twelve clubs opened the season; New York losing at
Baltimore, Brooklyn at Boston, Philadelphia at Washington, and
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, rain preventing the games scheduled for
Louisville and Cincinnati. On the 20th Chicago opened at Cincinnati with
a defeat, as did Cleveland at Louisville. By the end of the month's
campaign, on April 30th, the games played left the Boston, Cleveland and
St. Louis clubs tied for first place in the month's record, with
Philadelphia fourth, Baltimore fifth, and Pittsburgh sixth the second
division clubs being headed by Cincinnati--tied with Pittsburgh for
sixth place--and followed by Louisville, New York and Brooklyn tied for
ninth position, Washington and Chicago, the latter club being a bad
tail-ender with a record of eight defeats out of nine games played.

Here is the complete record of the thirteen days' campaign of the
opening month of the season, fifty victories and as many defeats having
been recorded:

THE  APRIL  RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------
                      P                   P
                  P   e                   P   e
                  l   r                   l   r
                L a   c                 L a   c
              W o y   e               W o y   e
              o s e   n               o s e   n
Clubs.        n t d   t       Clubs.  n t d   t
--------------------------------------------------
Boston        6 2 8 .750  Cincinnati  4 4 8 .500
Cleveland     6 2 8 .750  Louisville  4 5 9 .444
St. Louis     6 2 8 .750  New York    3 5 8 .375
Philadelphia  6 3 9 .667  Brooklyn    3 5 8 .375
Baltimore     5 3 8 .625  Washington  2 7 9 .174
Pittsburgh    4 4 8 .500  Chicago     1 8 9 .111
--------------------------------------------------

It had been confidently expected that Boston would be in the lead and
Cleveland not far off; but that St. Louis should be tied with both for
the lead was a surprise. Philadelphia was in its anticipated place, but
Baltimore was lower than the club officials had looked for, as also New
York, while the fact that the tail-ender of 1893 led the Chicago "Colts"
of 1894 was a disagreeable ending of the month's play for the Chicago
cranks.



THE MAY CAMPAIGN.

The May campaign changed the relative positions of the twelve clubs
materially. By May 31st, Pittsburgh had pulled up to the leading
position, having won 18 out of 23 games; and while Cleveland had held
its position fairly well, Baltimore had done better than Boston, and New
York had won more games than Brooklyn. Chicago, too, had rallied, while
St. Louis had fallen off badly, as also Cincinnati and Louisville; the
Washingtons winning but 4 games out of 23, that club ending the second
month's campaign a bad tail-ender in the figures of May. Here is the
record for May:

THE MAY RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
                         P                          P
                     P   e                      P   e
                     l   r                      l   r
                  L  a   c                   L  a   c
              W   o  y   e                W  o  y   e
              o   s  e   n                o  s  e   n
Clubs.        n   t  d   t   Clubs.       n  t  d   t
--------------------------------------------------------
Pittsburgh    18  5 28 .783  Brooklyn    12 11 23 .522
Cleveland     13  7 20 .684  Chicago      9 12 21 .429
Baltimore     12  6 18 .667  St. Louis    9 16 25 .360
Boston        14  8 22 .636  Cincinnati   7 13 20 .350
Philadelphia  12  7 19 .632  Louisville   6 14 20 .300
New York      13 11 24 .542  Washington   4 19 23 .174
--------------------------------------------------------

The monthly record differs in its percentage figures from the pennant
race record, as the latter gives the totals of the games played from
April 19th, while the former gives the totals of each month's games
only. A hundred and twenty-nine games, resulting in victories, were
played in May, with, of course, the same number of defeats. Seven of the
twelve clubs won more games than they lost.



THE JUNE CAMPAIGN.

The June campaign opened with Cleveland in the van in pennant race
percentages, the other clubs in the first division being the Pittsburgh,
Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston and Brooklyn clubs in order; New York
leading the second division, followed by St. Louis, Cincinnati,
Louisville, Chicago and Washington; the leader in the race having a
percentage of .690, and the tail-ender .212, a difference in percentage
figures of 478 points, showing a poorly contested race thus far. Only
two Western clubs by this time remained in the first division, viz.,
Cleveland and Pittsburgh; New York and Washington being the two Eastern
clubs in the second division. Baltimore overtook and passed Cleveland in
the first week of the June campaign, and closed the month in the
lead. Boston, too, rallied and pulled up in the race from fifth place on
June 4th to second position by June 11th, and remained there to the end
of the month. Brooklyn also took a jump from sixth place on June 18th to
third position on June 29th; New York not getting out of the second
division until the last of the month. In the meantime the two Western
teams of Cleveland and Pittsburgh began to lose ground, and by the 21st
of June they occupied fifth and sixth positions in the race, Cleveland
leading their rivals of Pittsburgh by 13 points. On the same date
Philadelphia was in third place, but the "Phillies" fell off to fifth
position by the end of the month. In victories won during June Brooklyn
led with 18 games won out of 23 played, Baltimore being second with 20
victories and 6 defeats, and Boston third with 18 games won to 8
lost. On June 8th Washington had pushed Louisville into the last ditch,
and also led Chicago; but the "Colts" got ahead of the "Senators" by the
end of the month. On June 30th Baltimore held the lead in the pennant
race with the percentage figures of .712 to Louisville's .255, a
difference of 457 points, only one Western club being in the first
division at the end of the month.

Here is the record of the June campaign, showing which club led in won
games during the month.

THE JUNE RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
                       P                            P
                   P   e                        P   e
                   l   r                        l   r
                L  a   c                     L  a   c
             W  o  y   e                  W  o  y   e
             o  s  e   n                  o  s  e   n
Clubs.       n  t  d   t   Clubs.         n  t  d   t
--------------------------------------------------------
Brooklyn    18  5 28 .789  Philadelphia  11 12 23 .478
Baltimore   20  6 26 .769  Cleveland      9 13 22 .409
Boston      18  8 26 .692  St. Louis     10 15 25 .406
New York    15  8 23 .686  Washington     9 15 24 .375
Pittsburgh  13 13 26 .500  Chicago        8 17 25 .320
Cincinnati  12 13 25 .480  Louisville     4 22 26 .154
--------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that out of the twelve clubs but four won more games
than they lost, the Louisvilles ending the month's play with a record of
but 4 games won out of 26 played, the poorest record of any single month
of the season.



THE JULY CAMPAIGN.

The July campaign opened with the Baltimore and Boston clubs as apparent
fixtures for the two leading positions, the "Orioles" leading the
champions on July 5th by seven points only, viz., .679 to .672. On the 2d
of July New York was sixth and Brooklyn third in the race. By July 5th,
however, the "Giants" had jumped into third place, and Brooklyn had
fallen back to sixth position. On the same date Baltimore, Boston and
New York occupied the three leading positions, and though three more
months of the season still remained, the other nine clubs were even then
virtually out of the race, the only other point of interest left in the
championship contest being that of the fight for the last three places
in the first division, Pittsburgh being at that time the only Western
club out of the second division. Of course, such a one-sided condition
of things in the pennant race led to a falling off in the interest in
the championship contests, especially out West, where the clubs of that
section lost patronage greatly, four of the six Western clubs being
virtually out of the race as early as May, as far as winning the pennant
was concerned. During July there were only two points of interest in the
race outside of the fight for first place between the three leaders,
viz., the struggle between the Brooklyn and Philadelphia clubs for
fourth place in the race, and that between the Cleveland and Pittsburgh
clubs to retain a place in the first division. Cleveland lost its
position in the first division the first week in July, Pittsburgh on
July 2d being in fourth place. By the 6th of that month the "Phillies"
had overtaken them, and by the 9th the Pittsburghs were down to sixth
place, the Clevelands then heading the second division. The "Pirates"
then rallied and got ahead of Brooklyn, the latter being driven into the
second division by July 17th, Cleveland rallying and getting among the
six leaders again by the 18th of July, after which date they remained in
that division to the close of the season, A feature of the July campaign
among the six tail-end clubs was the close fight between Washington and
Louisville on the edge of the last ditch. First one club would cross
the goal line and make a touch-down--as the foot ball men have it--and
then the other, Louisville being in eleventh place at the end of the
month, while the "Senators" rolled about in the last ditch. When the
July campaign ended Boston was in the van with the percentage figures of
.659, Baltimore being second with .618, and New York third with .613. It
looked at that time pretty sure for Boston.

Here is the record of the month's play, showing which club won the most
games during July:

THE  JULY   RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
                       P                            P
                   P   e                        P   e
                   l   r                        l   r
                L  a   c                     L  a   c
             W  o  y   e                  W  o  y   e
             o  s  e   n                  o  s  e   n
Clubs.       n  t  d   t   Clubs.         n  t  d   t
--------------------------------------------------------
New York    18  7 25 .720  Philadelphia  12 14 26 .462
Boston      16  9 25 .640  Baltimore     10 14 24 .417
Cleveland   18 11 29 .621  Pittsburgh    10 16 26 .385
Chicago     16 10 26 .615  St. Louis     10 17 27 .370
Cincinnati  16 11 27 .593  Brooklyn       9 16 25 .360
Louisville  13 15 28 .464  Washington     8 16 24 .331
--------------------------------------------------------

But five clubs out of the twelve won more games than they lost during
the July campaign, but there was a little improvement shown in the
difference of percentage points between the leader and tail-ender, the
figures being .363. The Baltimores made the poorest record in July for a
month's campaign of any they made during the season; while New York made
the best show of any one of their four months' campaigns up to the close
of July. Chicago also made their best monthly record in July, likewise
Cincinnati and Louisville.



THE AUGUST CAMPAIGN.

Baltimore rallied in fine style in August, that club winning 22 out of
29 games that month, while New York won 20 out of 28; but Boston won
only 15 out of 25, Philadelphia pulling up with 19 out of 29. Chicago
also won a majority of their August games, these being the only clubs of
the twelve which won more games during the month than they lost. When
the August campaign opened the first division clubs included Boston,
Baltimore, New York, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Brooklyn, the "Phillies"
being in the second division; but the latter soon took Brooklyn's place
and sent them to seventh place in the race. But before the first week
of the month had ended, Brooklyn replaced Pittsburgh in the first
division. The "Pirates," however rallied and drove their Eastern
opponents back again; Brooklyn ending the month in sixth place, and
after that the "Pirates" remained at the head of the second division to
the finish. The 31st of August saw the first division clubs fixed for
the season, as far as first and sixth places in the race were concerned,
the interesting point in the month's campaign being the struggle between
the New York and Boston clubs for second place and that between Brooklyn
and Philadelphia for fourth position. There was but one Western club in
the first division at the end of August, the other five staying in the
second division to the finish, a result that was ruinous to the
financial interests of the Western clubs, and to a large extent to the
clubs of the East, all of which clubs played to "small houses" out West,
especially at Louisville, the cranks of "Breckinridgeville" being
disgusted with their local club team during the last three months of the
season.

Here is the record of the August campaign, showing each club's victories
and defeats for August;

THE AUGUST RECORD.
-----------------------------------------------------------
                          P                            P
                      P   e                        P   e
                      l   r                        l   r
                   L  a   c                     L  a   c
                W  o  y   e                  W  o  y   e
                o  s  e   n                  o  s  e   n
Clubs.          n  t  d   t   Clubs.         n  t  d   t
-----------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore      22  7 29 .759  Washington    13 14 27 .481
New York       20  8 28 .714  St. Louis      9 13 22 .409
Philadelphia   19 10 29 .655  Cleveland      9 15 24 .375
Boston         15 10 25 .600  Pittsburgh     8 16 24 .333
Chicago        15 12 27 .556  Cincinnati     7 19 26 .269
Brooklyn       14 14 28 .500  Louisville     5 18 23 .217
-----------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that August was a bad month for the Boston champions,
while it was the very reverse for the Chicago "Colts," the latter making
their best monthly record in August. The difference in percentage
points between the leader and the tail-ender at the close of the August
campaign was 355 points, the best of the season to that date. Still the
figures showed a comparatively poor race, several of the minor league
races being more evenly contested. Cleveland and Pittsburgh were behind
Washington in percentage of victories during the August campaign, the
latter making their best monthly record in August, thereby escaping
their old place in the last ditch.



THE SEPTEMBER CAMPAIGN.

Baltimore virtually had the pennant in their hands the first week of the
September campaign, the only point of interest in the race left at that
time being the struggle for second place between New York and Boston;
all of the other clubs had long been practically out of the race, a
result which involved considerable loss for the majority of the twelve
League clubs. This state of things in the major league pennant race is
the result of the selfish policy of a minority in trying to monopolize
the cream of the playing element in the League ranks without regard to
the saving clause of the League organization, the principle of "_One for
all and all for one_," the very essence of the plan of running the
League on true business principles.

During September the Brooklyn club tried their best to oust the
"Phillies" out of fourth place, while the Clevelands worked hard to take
Brooklyn's position in fifth place, but both clubs failed in their
projects. Up to September 6th the "Giants" tried in vain to send the
Bostons down to third place, but it was not until the 7th of September
that they were able to oust the champions out of second place in the
race, and when they did so they kept them out to the finish, the
champions failing to rally after they had lost the position. It was a
close fight, however, as on September 10th New York led Boston in
percentage of victories by only 3 points, viz., .655 to .652, Baltimore
leading at that date with .684. By September 19th, however, the Bostons
had got down to .631, and New York's figures were .667, with "the
country safe." Boston's lowest score in percentage figures for the month
was reached on September 25th, when they touched .623. By that time the
places in the first division were all settled, and all of those in the
second division also, except Cincinnati and St. Louis. On September 29th
Cincinnati led St. Louis by the percentage figures of .424 to .415, but
two victories by St. Louis over Washington, against a drawn game by
Cincinnati with Cleveland on the 30th, gave St. Louis the lead by .424
to .419, and Comiskey's "Reds" had to finish in tenth position, beaten
in the race by Von der Abe's "Browns," a galling fact for the Cincinnati
cranks.

Here is the month's record of victories and defeats in September:

THE  SEPTEMBER  RECORD.
--------------------------------------------------------
                       P                            P
                   P   e                        P   e
                   l   r                        l   r
                L  a   c                     L  a   c
             W  o  y   e                  W  o  y   e
             o  s  e   n                  o  s  e   n
Clubs.       n  t  d   t   Clubs.         n  t  d   t
--------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore   20  3 23 .870  Philadelphia  13 12 25 .520
New York    20  6 26 .769  St. Louis     11 13 24 .458
Boston      14 11 25 .560  Cincinnati    10 16 26 .385
Cleveland   13 11 24 .542  Chicago        9 17 26 .346
Brooklyn    14 12 26 .538  Washington     8 16 24 .333
Pittsburgh  12 11 23 .522  Louisville     5 21 26 .192
--------------------------------------------------------

The appended summary shows the progress of each club from the opening to
the close of the season, as also in what month each club made its best
and worst record during the championship campaign:




SUMMARY   OF   VICTORIES   AND   DEFEATS.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                T
                                                        S       h
                                                        e       e
                                                        p
                                                A       t       F
                 A                              u       e       i
                 p              J       J       g       m       n
                 r      M       u       u       u       b       i
                 i      a       n       l       s       e       s
                 l      y       e       y       t       r       h
Clubs.         W. L.  W.  L.  W.  L.  W.  L.  W.  L.  W.  L.  W.  L.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore      5  3  12   6  20   6  10  14  22   7  20   3  89  39
New York       3  5  13  11  15   8  18   7  20   8  20   6  88  44
Boston         6  2  14   8  18   8  16   9  15  10  14  11  83  49
Philadelphia   6  3  12   7  11  12  12  14  19  10  13  12  71  56
Brooklyn       3  5  12  11  18   5   9  16  14  14  14  12  70  61
Cleveland      6  2  13   7   9  13  18  11   9  15  13  11  68  61
Pittsburgh     4  4  18   5  13  13  10  16   8  16  12  11  65  65
Chicago        1  8   9  12   8  17  16  10  15  12   9  17  57  75
St. Louis      6  2   9  16  10  15  10  17   9  13  11  13  56  76
Cincinnati     4  4   7  13  12  13  16  11   7  19  10  16  54  75
Washington     2  7   4  19   9  15   8  16  13  14   8  16  45  87
Louisville     4  5   6  14   4  22  13  15   5  18   5  21  36  94
Totals        50 50 129 129 147 147 156 156 156 156 149 149 782 782
----------------------------------------------------------------------



MONTHLY RECORD OF PERCENTAGE.

The following table shows the monthly record of percentage of victories
in the campaign from April to September.

----------------------------------------------
1894.                                    S
                                         e
                                         p
                                    A    t
                 A                  u    e
                 p        J    J    g    m
                 r   M    u    u    u    b
                 i   a    n    l    s    e
Clubs.           l   y    e    y    t    r
---------------------------------------------
Baltimore     .625 .654 .712 .618 .657 .695
New York      .375 .500 .564 .613 .639 .667
Boston        .750 .645 .667 .659 .645 .629
Philadelphia  .667 .643 .569 .526 .562 .559
Brooklyn      .375 .500 .623 .545 .533 .534
Cleveland     .750 .679 .549 .575 .529 .527
Pittsburgh    .500 .710 .614 .531 .491 .500
Chicago       .111 .333 .327 .430 .458 .432
St. Louis     .750 .455 .431 .412 .411 .421
Cincinnati    .500 .393 .434 .488 .434 .419
Washington    .222 .188 .281 .296 .343 .341
Louisville    .444 .345 .255 .325 .302 .277
---------------------------------------------

It will be seen that in percentage figures of each month's play, Boston,
Cleveland and St. Louis were tied in April. In May, Pittsburgh,
Cleveland and Baltimore led. In June, Baltimore, Boston and Brooklyn
were in the van. In July, the three leaders were Boston, Baltimore and
New York. In August, also, the same three were nearest the goal, and
September saw Baltimore carrying off the pennant, followed by New York
and Boston.



THE CAMPAIGN RECORD OF 1894.

We introduce in the GUIDE for 1895 a new and important record, which
shows, at a glance almost, the total score of each championship game
_won_, _lost_ and _drawn_ from April 19th to September 30th, inclusive,
and also gives the names of the pitchers who were credited with pitching
in a victory, or charged with pitching in a defeat. The record of each
month's campaign, too, is given, with the position in the pennant race
each of the twelve clubs occupied at the close of each month's campaign
of the six comprising the championship season. This record in full will
be found to be the most complete table of the statistics of the League
season yet published in the GUIDE series, and especially valuable as a
reference record.



THE APRIL RECORD.

The League championship season of 1894 began on April 19th and ended on
September 30th, the April campaign opening at Boston, Baltimore,
Washington and St. Louis on the 19th, at Cincinnati and Louisville on
the 20th, and at Philadelphia and Brooklyn on the 21st, while the
opening games at New York, Pittsburgh and Chicago were not played until
the 24th, 25th and 28th of April respectively, and not at Cleveland
until May 3d. Fifty games were played in April, the twelve clubs of the
two divisions of the League being engaged in playing their respective
home-and-home series. Here is the complete record of the April campaign,
showing the pitchers of each side and the total score of each contest of
the month:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date  Contesting Clubs.        City.        Pitchers.          Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
April
 19 Boston vs. Brooklyn        Boston       Stivetts Kennedy     13-2
 19 Baltimore vs. New York     Baltimore    McMahon  Rusie       8-3
 19 Washington vs. Philadelphi Washington   Esper    Weyhing     4-2
 19 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh   St. Louis    Breitenstein Killen  11-3
 20 Baltimore vs. New York     Baltimore    Mullane  Clark       12-6
 20 Philadelphia vs. Washi'g'n Washington   Taylor   Stephens    9-8
 20 Cincinnati vs. Chicago     Cincinnati   Parrott  Hutchinson  10-6
 20 Louisville vs. Cleveland   Louisville   Menafee  Young       10-3
 21 Boston vs. Brooklyn        Brooklyn     Nichols  Stein       3-0
 21 Baltimore vs. New York     Baltimore    Inks     Westervelt  4-3
 21 Philadelphia vs. Washi'g'n Philadelphia Carsey   Esper       10-2
 21 Cincinnati vs. Chicago     Cincinnati   Chamberlain Abbey    8-0
 21 Cleveland vs. Louisville   Louisville   Cuppy    Hemming     5-1
 21 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis   St. Louis    Gumbert  Gleason     7-2
 22 Cincinnati vs. Chicago     Cincinnati   Dwyer    McGill      5-4
 22 Cleveland vs. Louisville   Louisville   Clarkson Kilroy      3-2
 23 Boston vs. Brooklyn        Brooklyn     Lovett   Daub        7-4
 23 Philadelphia vs. Washi'g'n Washington   Weyhing  Stockdale   8-4
 23 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh   St. Louis    Breitenstein Ehret   4-3
 24 Baltimore vs. Boston       Baltimore    McMahon  Stivetts    15-3
 24 Washington vs. New York    Washington   Petty    Rusie       6-3
 24 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn  Brooklyn     Carsey   Korwan      22-5
 24 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati   Cincinnati   Young    Parrott     1-0
 24 Louisville vs. Pittsburgh  Pittsburgh   Menafee  Nicol       7-3
 24 St. Louis vs. Chicago      Chicago      A. Clarkson McGill   9-5
 25 New York vs. Washington    Washington   German   Maul        14-5
 25 Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia  Brooklyn     Stein    Taylor      8-2
 25 Boston vs. Baltimore       Baltimore    Nichols  Mullane     6-3
 25 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati   Cincinnati   Cuppy    Chamberlain 12-6
 25 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville  Louisville   Gumbert  Hemming     2-1
 25 St. Louis vs. Chicago      Chicago      Hawley   Hutchinson  13-3
 26 New York vs. Washington    Washington   Meekin   Stockdale   7-5
 26 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn  Brooklyn     Weyhing  Sharrott    13-3
 26 Boston vs. Baltimore       Baltimore    Staley   Brown       13-7
 26 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati   Cincinnati   Clarkson Cross       12-4
 26 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville  Louisville   Killen   Kilroy      3-1
 26 St. Louis vs. Chicago      Chicago      Gleason  Abbey       10-4
 27 No games scheduled                      -----------         ----
 28 New York vs. Baltimore     New York     Rusie    McMahon     9-6
 28 Brooklyn vs. Washington    Washington   Stein    Petty       10-9
 28 Philadelphia vs. Boston    Philadelphia Carsey   Stivetts    14-3
 28 St. Louis vs. Cleveland    St. Louis    Breitenstein Young   7-1
 28 Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh  Cincinnati   Parrott  Terry       10-5
 28 Chicago vs. Louisville     Louisville   McGill   Menafee     2-1
 29 Cleveland vs. St Louis     St. Louis    Cuppy    A. Clarkson 5-2
 29 Louisville vs. Chicago     Louisville   Hemming  McGill      8-3
 30 Baltimore vs. New York     New York     Mullane  German      10-6
 30 Brooklyn vs. Washington    Washington   Gastright Mercer     15-10
 30 Boston vs. Philadelphia    Philadelphia Nichols  Weyhing[1]  6-5
 30 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati  Cincinnati   Nicol   Chamberlain  15-6
 30 Louisville vs. Chicago     Louisville   Stratton McGill      8-2

[Footnote 1: Ten innings.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The record showing the total victories and defeats scored by each of the
twelve clubs during the April campaign is as follows. The names are
given in the order of the percentage of victories scored in the pennant
race:

APRIL PENNANT RACE RECORD.
-------------------------------------------------------
              V                         V
              i        P                i        P
              c  D     e                c  D     e
              t  e  P  r                t  e  P  r
              o  f  l                   o  f  l
              r  e  a  c                r  e  a  c
              i  a  y  e                i  a  y  e
              e  t  e  n                e  t  e  n
CLUBS         s  s  d  t    CLUBS       s  s  d  t
------------------------------------------------------
Boston        6  2  8 .750  Cincinnati  4  4  8 .500
Cleveland     6  2  8 .750  Louisville  4  5  9 .444
St. Louis     6  2  8 .750  New York    3  5  8 .375
Philadelphia  6  3  9 .667  Brooklyn    3  5  8 .375
Baltimore     5  3  8 .625  Washington  2  7  9 .222
Pittsburgh    4  4  8 .500  Chicago     1  8  9 .111

Fifty games were played from April 19th to April 30th, inclusive.
None were drawn or forfeited.
------------------------------------------------------

The first month of the championship campaign, short as it was, was
marked by the largest attendance for the month of April known in the
history of the League, an aggregate of 188,509 people patronizing the
twenty-five games played in the East and 82,719 for the twenty-five
played in the West. The largest aggregate attendance on a single day was
45,332 on April 21st, on which date 40,324 people patronized the three
games played at Brooklyn, Philadelphia and Baltimore, and 5,008 the
three games played at Cincinnati, St. Louis and Louisville. Though three
Western clubs occupied positions in the first division--Cleveland and
St. Louis tieing Boston for first place--the attendance in the West, as
will be seen above, did not compare with that at the three games in the
East, the terribly hard times out West greatly affecting everything in
the amusement line in the Western League club cities.

Boston, Cleveland and St. Louis started off well in the pennant race in
April, these three clubs ending the April campaign tied for first place;
with the "Phillies" a good fourth, Baltimore fifth, and Pittsburgh and
Cincinnati tied for sixth position, Louisville being eighth, with New
York and Brooklyn tied for ninth place, and Washington on the edge of
the last ditch, the Chicago "Colts" being last on the list, they having
won but one game out of nine played during the opening month of the
season. During April the clubs of the two sections took part in their
first home-and-home series, this series of games lasting into May.



THE MAY CAMPAIGN RECORD.

The following is the complete record of the campaign of May, which
proved to be a very interesting one:

THE MAY RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.  Contesting Clubs.         City.        Pitchers.          Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
May  1 New York vs. Baltimore    New York     Meekin       McMahon  7-4
 "   1 Brooklyn vs. Washington   Washington   Sharrott  Stephens[3] 2-1
 "   1 Boston vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Lovett        Carsey  7-3
 "   1 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati   Killen       Parrott  7-6
 "   1 Cleveland vs. St. Louis   St. Louis    Clarkson     Gleason  7-0
 "   2 Washington vs. Boston     Washington   Maul        Stivetts  6-4
 "   2 Baltimore vs. Brooklyn    Baltimore    Brown          Stein  8-2
 "   2 Philadelphia vs. New York New York     Taylor         Rusie  7-5
 "   3 Boston vs. Washington     Washington   Nichols        Esper 10-8
 "   3 Philadelphia vs. New York New York     Weyh'g    Westervelt  7-4
 "   3 Baltimore vs. Brookyln    Baltimore    Mullane    Gastright  8-3
 "   3 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis  Pittsburgh   Gumbert  Breit'nst'n  6-2
 "   3 Cleveland vs. Louisville  Cleveland    Young        Menafee  7-2
 "   4 Boston vs. Washington     Washington   Stivetts    Stephens 15-5
 "   4 New York vs. Philadelphia New York     Rusie        Haddock  6-4
 "   4 Baltimore vs. Brooklyn    Baltimore    McMahon     Sharrott 12-8
 "   4 Cleveland vs. Louisville  Cleveland    Cuppy        Hemming  8-4
 "   4 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis  Pittsburgh   Nicol    A. Clarkson 10-9
 "   4 Chicago vs. Cincinnati    Chicago      McGill         Dwyer  6-3
 "   5 New York vs. Boston       New York     Westervelt    Lovett  5-2
 "   5 Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia Philadelphia Daub          Carsey  4-3
 "   5 Baltimore vs. Washington  Washington   Brown         Mercer  9-2
 "   5 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis  St. Louis    Killen        Hawley  6-5
 "   6 Cincinnati vs. Chicago    Chicago      Chamberlain     Camp  6-6
 "   7 Boston vs. New York       New York     Nichols        Rusie  1-0
 "   7 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn Philadelphia Weyhing    Gastright  7-5
 "   7 Baltimore vs. Washington  Washington   Mullane         Maul 17-0
 "   7 Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh Pittsburgh   Parrott      Gumbert 17-6
 "   7 St. Louis vs. Louisville  Louisville   Breitenst'n Stratton  8-6
 "   7 Cleveland vs. Chicago     Cleveland    Young         McGill  7-1
 "   8 New York vs. Boston       New York     Meekin      Stivetts 16-7
 "   8 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn Philadelphia Haddock         Daub 18-5
 "   8 Baltimore vs. Washington  Baltimore    Inks           Petty 11-5
 "   8 Cleveland vs. Chicago     Cleveland    Cuppy           Camp 18-3
 "   8 St. Louis vs. Louisville  Louisville   Hawley       Menafee  5-4
 "   8 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati Pittsburgh   Ehret          Dwyer  6-5
 "   9 Brooklyn vs. Boston       Brooklyn     Kennedy       Lovett  7-3
 "   9 Baltimore vs. Washington  Washington   McMahon    Stockdale 12-6
 "   9 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati Pittsburgh   Gumbert     Chambl'n 11-3
 "   9 Cleveland vs. Chicago     Cleveland    Clarkson      McGill  4-1
 "   9 Louisville vs. St. Louis  Louisville   Hemming      Gleason  6-3
 "  10 New York vs. Washington   New York     Rusie         Mercer  6-2
 "  10 Boston vs. Brooklyn       Boston       Nichols        Stein  7-1
 "  10 Philadelphia vs. Baltimore Baltimore   Taylor       Mullane  9-3
 "  10 Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh  Pittsburgh   Young         Killen  2-1
 "  10 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis  Cincinnati   Parrott       Hawley 18-9
 "  11 New York vs. Washington   Washington   Westervelt     Petty  5-4
 "  11 Philadelphia vs. Baltimore Baltimore   Carsey        Horner 12-7
 "  11 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland  Pittsburgh   Ehret          Cuppy  7-6
 "  11 Chicago vs. Louisville    Chicago      Griffith    Stratton  4-2
 "  12 New York vs. Washington   New York     Meekin     Stockdale  5-2
 "  12 Brooklyn vs. Boston       Boston       Kennedy     Stivetts  8-2
 "  12 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia Baltimore   Brown       Callahan  8-3
 "  12 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland  Pittsburgh   Killen      Clarkson  8-5
"  12 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis  Cincinnati   Parrott Breitenstein  5-0
 "  12 Chicago vs. Louisville    Chicago      Hutchinson Hemming    6-5
 "  13 Chicago vs. Louisville    Chicago      McGill     Kilroy     14-12
 "  13 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis  Cincinnati   Dwyer      Gleason    7-3
 "  14 Philadelphia vs. New York Philadelphia Carsey     Rusie[2]   5-4
 "  14 Brooklyn vs. Washington   Brooklyn     Gastright  Mercer     14-7
 "  14 Baltimore vs. Boston      Boston       McMahon    Nichols    16-5
 "  14 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago    Pittsburgh   Gumbert    Abbey      6-3
 "  14 Cincinnati vs. Louisville Cincinnati   Parrott    Whitrock   12-7
 "  14 Cleveland vs. St. Louis   Cleveland    Young  Breitenstein   7-3
 "  15 Baltimore vs. Boston      Boston       Stopped by fire(3in)  3-3
 "  15 Philadelphia vs. New York Philadelphia Taylor   Westervelt   10-4
 "  15 Brooklyn vs. Washington   Brooklyn     Stein       Petty     16-7
 "  15 Cleveland vs. St. Louis   Cleveland    Cuppy   A. Clarkson   7-0
 "  15 Chicago vs. Pittsburgh    Pittsburgh   Griffith    Ehret     6-2
 "  16 Boston vs. Baltimore      Boston       Lovett      Mullane   10-8
 "  16 Philadelphia vs. New York Philadelphia Haddock     Meekin    10-1
 "  16 Brooklyn vs. Washington   Brooklyn     Daub        Mercer[1] 3-2
 "  16 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago    Pittsburgh   Killen      McGill    2-0
 "  16 Cleveland vs. St. Louis   Cleveland    Clarkson    Gleason   5-0
 "  16 Louisville vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati   Hemming     Dwyer     9-7
 "  17 New York vs. Brooklyn     Brooklyn     Rusie       Kennedy   6-4
 "  17 Boston vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Nichols     Carsey    4-3
 "  17 Baltimore vs. Washington  Baltimore    Hawke       Petty     10-2
 "  18 Brooklyn vs. New York     New York     Stein       German    16-7
 "  18 Philadelphia vs. Boston   Philadelphia Taylor    Stivetts[1] 5-4
 "  19 New York vs. Brooklyn     Brooklyn     Meekin      Daub[1]   3-3
 "  19 Philadelphia vs. Boston   Philadelphia Haddock     Staley    8-7
 "  19 Baltimore vs. Washington  Baltimore    McMahon     Mercer    7-5
 "  19 St. Louis vs. Cincinnati  St. Louis    Breitenstein Parrott  5-2
 "  19 Cleveland vs. Chicago     Chicago      Young       Griffith  9-5
 "  20 St. Louis vs. Cincinnati  St. Louis    Hawley Chamberlain[1] 4-3
 "  20 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis  St. Louis    Dwyer    A. Clarkson  7-1
 "  21 Boston vs. New York       Boston       Nichols   Westervelt  3-0
 "  21 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago    Chicago      Killen      McGill    11-10
 "  21 Cincinnati vs. Cleveland  Cleveland    Parrott     Young     2-1
 "  22 Boston vs. New York       Boston       Lovett      Rusie     3-2
 "  22 Chicago vs. Pittsburgh    Chicago      Griffith    Ehret     7-6
 "  22 St. Louis vs. Louisville  St. Louis    Gleason     Kilroy    6-4
 "  23 New York vs. Boston       Boston       Meekin      Staley    12-4
 "  23 Brooklyn vs. Baltimore    Baltimore    Kennedy     Mullane   5-1
 "  23 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago    Chicago      Gumbert Hutchinson[3] 10-9
 "  23 Louisville vs. St. Louis  St. Louis    Hemming     Hawley    4-3
 "  24 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland  Cleveland    Ehret       Young     6-5
 "  24 Louisville vs. Cincinnati Louisville   Menafee     Parrott   6-0
 "  24 Chicago vs. St. Louis     Chicago      Hutchinson Breit'st'n 3-1
 "  25 New York vs. Brooklyn     Brooklyn     Rusie       Kennedy   12-6
 "  25 Boston vs. Washington     Boston       Nichols     Maul      10-2
 "  25 Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh  Cleveland    Clarkson    Killen    5-2
 "  26 New York vs. Brooklyn     New York     Meekin      Stein     8-7
 "  26 Boston vs. Washington     Boston       Lovett      Mercer    10-8
 "  26 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia Philadelphia Inks       Taylor    5-5
 "  26 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland  Cleveland    Ehret       Cuppy[3]  12-3
 "  26 St. Louis vs. Chicago     Chicago      Breitenstein Griffith 9-8
"  26 Louisville vs. Cincinnati Louisville   Knell         Parrott  5-2
 "  27 St. Louis vs. Chicago     St. Louis    Hawley         McGill  3-2
 "  27 Louisville vs. Cincinnati Cincinnati   Hemming         Dwyer  6-5
 "  28 Boston vs. Washington     Boston       Staley          Petty 18-12
 "  28 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville Pittsburgh   Gumbert       Menafee  4-2
 "  28 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville Pittsburgh   Killen       Stratton 11-6
 "  29 New York vs. Cleveland    New York     Meekin          Young  2-0
 "  29 Philadelphia vs. Chicago  Philadelphia Taylor     Hutchinson 14-7
 "  29 Washington vs. Louisville Washington   Mercer        Hemming 12-2
 "  29 St. Louis vs. Brooklyn    Brooklyn     Breit'stein   Kennedy  9-8
 "  29 Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore  Pittsburgh   Ehret         McMahon  3-2
 "  30 New York vs. Cleveland    New York     Rusie           Cuppy  2-1
 "  30 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis    Brooklyn     Stein     A. Clarkson  6-2
 "  30 Washington vs. Louisville Washington   Petty           Knell  7-3
 "  30 Boston vs. Cincinnati     Boston       Lovett        Parrott 13-10
 "  30 Chicago vs. Philadelphia  Philadelphia McGill        Haddock 12-4
 "  30 Boston vs. Cincinnati     Boston       Nichols   Chamberlain 20-11
 "  30 Washington vs. Louisville Washington   Maul           Kilroy 14-9
 "  30 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis    Brooklyn     Daub           Hawley  5-2
 "  30 Chicago vs. Philadelphia  Philadelphia Griffith      Weyhing 12-6
 "  30 Cleveland vs. New York    New York     Clarkson    German[2]  3-2
 "  31 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati  Baltimore    Mullane         Dwyer  7-1
 "  31 Brooklyn vs. Chicago      Brooklyn     Kennedy         Terry  5-3
 "  31 Pittsburgh vs. Washington Washington   Killen          Esper 15-4
 "  31 St. Louis vs. New York    New York     Breit'stein West'velt  6-2

[Footnote 1: Ten innings.]
[Footnote 2: Eleven innings.]
[Footnote 3: Forfeited.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

During the May campaign the first home-and-home series was completed,
and the first West vs. East series commenced.

The record showing the relative positions of the twelve clubs up to the
close of the May campaign, as also the number of games won and lost by
each club during May, is as follows:



THE MAY PENNANT RACE RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------
                          P                              P
                      P   e                          P   e
                      l   r                          l   r
                  L   a   c                      L   a   c
              W   o   y   e                  W   o   y   e
              o   s   e   n                  o   s   e   n
Clubs.        n   t   d   t    Clubs.        n   t   d   t
--------------------------------------------------------------
Pittsburgh   22   9  31  .710  Brooklyn     15  15  30  .500
Cleveland    19   9  28  .679  St. Louis    15  18  33  .455
Baltimore    17   9  26  .651  Cincinnati   11  17  28  .393
Boston       20  11  31  .645  Louisville   10  19  29  .345
Philadelphia 18  10  28  .643  Chicago      10  20  30  .333
New York     16  16  32  .500  Washington    6  26  32  .188

Three games were drawn during May; one was forfeited;
one protested; and one stopped by fire.
--------------------------------------------------------------

During May the Pittsburghs pulled up to the head of the first division,
with the percentage figures of .710, Cleveland being second with .679,
and Baltimore third with .654; Boston, Philadelphia and New York
following in order--Brooklyn being tied with New York for sixth
place. Baltimore had pulled up ahead of Boston, while Philadelphia fell
off, as did St. Louis and Cincinnati, both of the latter clubs retiring
to the second division, while Washington allowed the April tail-enders
to push them into the last ditch, and it was not until August 23d that
they got out of it.



THE JUNE CAMPAIGN RECORD.

The month's record of the June campaign shows that several important
changes were made in the relative positions of the majority of the
twelve clubs in the race, the record being as follows:

THE JUNE RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.  Contesting Clubs.            City.        Pitchers.           Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 1 Washington vs. Pittsburgh    Washington   Mercer       Gumbert 10-5
 "   1 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Baltimore    Hawke       Chambl'n  9-8
 "   1 Brooklyn vs. Chicago         Brooklyn     Gastright   Griffith  5-0
 "   1 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Philadelphia Taylor    Menafee[3] 10-3
 "   1 Cleveland vs. Boston         Boston       Young       Stivetts 22-8
 "   1 St. Louis vs. New York       New York     A. Clarkson    Rusie  5-1
 "   2 St. Louis vs. New York       New York     Hawley        Meekin  2-2
 "   2 Boston vs. Cleveland         Boston       Nichols     Clarkson 11-10
 "   2 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Philadelphia Weyhing      Hemming 11-0
 "   2 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Baltimore    McMahon      Parrott 13-6
 "   2 Washington vs. Pittsburgh    Washington   Maul           Ehret 11-6
 "   2 Brooklyn vs. Chicago         Brooklyn     Stein          Abbey  1-0
 "   3 No games scheduled
 "   4 Cincinnati vs. New York      New York     Dwyer         German  8-4
 "   4 Pittsburgh vs. Boston        Boston       Killen        Staley  7-4
 "   4 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Breitenstein  Taylor  3-2
 "   4 Washington vs. Cleveland     Washington   Petty          Cuppy  8-5
 "   4 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Baltimore    Hawke         McGill 12-4
 "   4 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Brooklyn     Daub           Knell 18-4
 "   5 New York vs. Cincinnati      New York     Meekin    Chamberl'n 10-6
 "   5 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Brooklyn     Kennedy      Menafee  5-4
 "   5 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Boston       Nichols      Gumbert  7-3
 "   5 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Baltimore    McMahon Hutchinson[1] 8-5
 "   5 Cleveland vs. Washington     Washington   Young         Mercer  9-6
 "   5 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Hawley       Weyhing  7-3
 "   6 Pittsburgh vs. Boston        Boston       Colcolough     Lampe 27-11
 "   7 Pittsburgh vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Gumbert    Gastright 13-13
 "   7 New York vs. Chicago         New York     Westervelt     Terry  8-7
 "   7 Philadelphia vs. Cleveland   Philadelphia Taylor      Clarkson  6-0
 "   7 Boston vs. St. Louis         Boston       Nichols Breitenstein 18-7
 "   7 Washington vs. Cincinnati    Washington   Maul         Parrott  8-8
 "   7 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Baltimore    Inks         Hemming  7-4
 "   8 New York vs. Chicago         New York     Rusie         McGill  3-0
 "   8 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Brooklyn     Kennedy        Ehret  2-1
 "   8 Boston vs. St. Louis         Boston       Stivetts  A.Clarkson 12-6
 "   8 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Baltimore    Hawke       Stratton 14-2
 "   8 Washington vs. Cincinnati    Washington   Esper          Dwyer  9-6
 "   8 Cleveland vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Young        Weyhing  4-1
 "   9 Boston vs. St. Louis         Boston       Nichols Breitenstein 12-8
 "   9 Philadelphia vs. Cleveland   Philadelphia Taylor       Fischer  9-1
 "   9 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Baltimore    McMahon      Menafee  7-5
 "   9 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Brooklyn     Daub          Killen 14-5
 "   9 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Washington   Chamberlain    Petty  8-3
 "   9 Chicago vs. New York         New York     Hutchinson    Meekin 10-9
 "  10 No games scheduled.
 "  11 New York vs. Louisville      New York     Rusie        Hemming  8-3
 "  11 Boston vs. Chicago           Boston       Stivetts       Terry 15-14
 "  11 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh  Philadelphia Weyhing       Killen  7-4
 "  11 Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati      Brooklyn     Stein          Dwyer 12-11
 "  11 St. Louis vs. Washington     Washington   A. Clarkson  Maul[2]  3-2
 "  11 Cleveland vs. Baltimore      Baltimore    Young          Brown  9-7
 "  12 New York vs. Louisville      New York     Meekin         Knell  4-1
 "  12 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh  Philadelphia Taylor         Ehret 17-1
 "  12 Boston vs. Chicago           Boston       Nichols       McGill 12-9
 "  12 Washington vs. St. Louis     Washington   Mercer  Breitenstein  4-3
 "  12 Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Chamberlain Gastright 5-3
 "  13 New York vs. Louisville      New York     Rusie        Hemming  7-5
 "  13 Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati      Brooklyn     Daub         Parrott 11-5
 "  13 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Baltimore    McMahon     Clarkson  9-2
 "  13 Washington vs. St. Louis     Washington   Esper        Gleason 12-3
 "  13 Chicago vs. Boston           Chicago      Griffith      Lovett  6-2
 "  13 Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia  Pittsburgh   Nicol         Carsey  8-6
 "  14 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Weyhing        Dwyer  5-2
 "  14 Boston vs. Louisville        Boston       Staley         Knell  9-6
 "  14 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      Baltimore    Mullane Br'tenst'n[2] 7-6
 "  14 Cleveland vs. Brooklyn       Brooklyn     Young        Kennedy  5-4
 "  14 Pittsburgh vs. New York      New York     Killen         Clark 10-4
 "  14 Chicago vs. Washington       Washington   McGill   Sullivan[2] 12-11
 "  15 New York vs. Pittsburgh      New York     Meekin       Gumbert  9-2
 "  15 Brooklyn vs. Cleveland       Brooklyn     Stein         Lyster  9-8
 "  15 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Callahan Chamberlain 21-8
 "  15 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      Baltimore    Hawke    A. Clarkson 17-3
 "  15 Washington vs. Chicago       Washington   Maul           Abbey  6-4
 "  15 Boston vs. Louisville        Boston       Stivetts     Hemming 15-10
 "  16 New York vs. Pittsburgh      New York     Rusie          Ehret  8-5
 "  16 Brooklyn vs. Cleveland       Brooklyn     Kennedy      Fischer 11-7
 "  16 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Carsey         Pfann 19-9
 "  16 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      Baltimore    McMahon Breitenstein 12-5
 "  16 Boston vs. Louisville        Boston       Lovett      Stratton 16-10
 "  16 Chicago vs. Washington       Chicago      Griffith       Esper 11-5
 "  17 St. Louis vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   A.Clarkson Tannehill  9-6
 "  18 Philadelphia vs. New York    New York     Weyhing       Meekin  4-1
 "  18 Brooklyn vs. Washington      Washington   Stein         Mercer 10-6
 "  18 Boston vs. Baltimore         Boston       Stivetts     Mullane 24-7
 "  18 Baltimore vs. Boston         Boston       McMahon      Nichols  9-7
 "  18 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville    Pittsburgh   Colcolough     Knell  9-8
 "  18 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville    Pittsburgh   Killen       Menafee 11-1
 "  18 Cleveland vs. Chicago        Cleveland    Young         McGill 11-3
 "  18 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis     St. Louis    Dwyer   Breitenstein  8-4
 "  19 Brooklyn vs. Washington      Washington   Kennedy         Maul 11-9
 "  19 Baltimore vs. Boston         Boston       Hawke         Staley 13-8
 "  19 Chicago vs. Cleveland        Cleveland    Terry          Knaus  5-2
 "  19 Louisville vs. Pittsburgh    Pittsburgh   Hemming       Easton  9-4
 "  19 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis     St. Louis    Chamb'lain    Hawley  3-2
 "  20 New York vs. Philadelphia    New York     Clark         Carsey  6-4
 "  20 New York vs. Philadelphia    New York     Rusie       Callahan 14-6
 "  20 Boston vs. Baltimore         Boston       Stivetts     McMahon 13-12
 "  20 Washington vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Esper           Daub 16-12
 "  20 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville    Pittsburgh   Gumbert      Menafee  7-6
 "  20 Cleveland vs. Chicago        Cleveland    Clarkson    Griffith  7-3
 "  20 St. Louis vs. Cincinnati     St. Louis    Breitenstein   Blank  4-2
 "  21 Brooklyn vs. New York        Brooklyn     Kennedy       Germar 16-1
 "  21 Boston vs. Washington        Boston       Nichols          Mau 10-7
 "  21 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia   Baltimore    Mullane      Weyhing  9-5
 "  21 Chicago vs. Pittsburgh       Pittsburgh   Terry          Ehrel 10-7
 "  21 Louisville vs. Cincinnati    Cincinnati   Knell          Dwyer  5-4
 "  22 Brooklyn vs. New York        New York     Stein          Rusie  7-0
 "  22 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia   Baltimore    Inks          Burris 18-14
 "  22 Washington vs. Boston        Washington   Mercer        Staley 26-12
 "  22 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago       Pittsburgh   Killen      Griffith 11-4
 "  22 Cleveland vs. St. Louis      St. Louis    Young    A. Clarkson  6-3
 "  23 New York vs. Brooklyn        Brooklyn     Meekin       Kennedy 10-8
 "  23 Boston vs. Washington        Washington   Stivetts       Esper 12-5
 "  23 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia   Baltimore    McMahon       Lukens 18-11
 "  23 St. Louis vs. Cleveland      St. Louis    Breitenst'n Griffith 14-8
 "  23 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago       Pittsburgh   Colcol'gh Hutchinson  9-4
 "  23 Cincinnati vs. Louisville    Cincinnati   Chamberlain Stratt'n  5-1
 "  23 Cincinnati vs. Louisville    Cincinnati   Tannehill    Menafee  8-8
 "  24 Cincinnati vs. Louisville    Louisville   Dwyer        Hemming  7-5
 "  24 St. Louis vs. Cleveland      St. Louis    Hawley      Clarkson 14-10
 "  24 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Chicago      Hawke          Terry 11-10
 "  25 St. Louis vs. New York       St. Louis    A.Clarkson     Rusie  3-2
 "  25 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Killen         Esper  6-1
 "  25 Chicago vs. Baltimore        Chicago      Hutchinson   Mullane 15-8
 "  25 Boston vs. Louisville        Louisville   Nichols        Knell  9-1
 "  26 New York vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Meekin  Breitenstein  4-3
 "  26 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Chicago      McMahon       McGill 14-6
 "  26 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Ehret       Sullivan  6-5
 "  27 New York vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Westervelt    Hawley 11-0
 "  27 Brooklyn vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Stein          Young 10-7
 "  27 Brooklyn vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Daub        Clarkson  5-2
 "  27 Boston vs. Louisville        Louisville   Stivetts     Menafee 13-3
 "  27 Chicago vs. Baltimore        Chicago      Griffith       Hawke 13-4
 "  27 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Gumbert       Mercer 11-4
 "  27 Cincinnati vs.Philadelphia   Cincinnati   Parrott      Weyhing  7-3
 "  28 New York vs. Chicago         Chicago      Rusie          Terry  6-5
 "  28 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Pittsburgh   Kennedy       Killen 11-7
 "  28 Boston vs. St. Louis         St. Louis   Nichols A.Clarkson[1] 12-11
 "  28 Cleveland vs. Baltimore      Cleveland    Cuppy        Mullane 18-11
 "  28 Louisville vs. Philadelphia  Louisville   Hemming    Carsey[1] 11-9
 "  28 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Cincinnati   Chamberlain     Maul  6-4
 "  29 New York vs. Chicago         Chicago      Meekin    Hutchinson 14-8
 "  29 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Pittsburgh   Stein          Ehret  7-5
 "  29 Boston vs. St. Louis         St. Louis    Staley  Breitenstein 13-4
 "  29 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Cleveland    McMahon     Griffith  9-6
 "  29 Louisville vs. Philadelphia  Louisville   Knell         Lukens 12-5
 "  29 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Cincinnati   Dwyer       Sullivan  6-4
 "  30 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Cleveland    Inks           Young  5-3
 "  30 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Louisville   Weyhing      Menafee 13-6
 "  30 Pittsburgh vs. Brooklyn      Pittsburgh   Gumbert      Kennedy 10-6
 "  30 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Cincinnati   Parrott       Mercer 12-0
 "  30 St. Louis vs. Boston         St. Louis    A. Clarkson   Lovett 10-9

[Footnote 1: Ten innings.]
[Footnote 2: Eleven innings.]
[Footnote 3: Forfeited.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE JUNE PENNANT RACE RECORD.
-------------------------------------------------------
                       P                          P
                   P   e                      P   e
                   l   r                      l   r
                L  a   c                   L  a   c
             W  o  y   e                W  o  y   e
             o  s  e   n                o  s  e   n
Clubs.       n  t  d   t   Clubs.       n  t  d   t
-------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore    37 15 52 .712 Cleveland    28 23 51 .549
Boston       38 19 57 .667 Cincinnati   23 30 53 .434
Brooklyn     33 20 53 .623 St. Louis    25 33 58 .431
Pittsburgh   35 22 57 .614 Chicago      18 37 55 .327
Philadelphia 29 22 51 .569 Washington   16 41 57 .281
New York     31 24 55 .564 Louisville   14 41 55 .255

No games were drawn, forfeited or protested.
-------------------------------------------------------

The Baltimore club retained the leading position in the race at the
close of the June campaign with the percentage figures of .712, the
tail-end club's percentage figures being .255, a difference in
percentage points of .457, thereby showing a poorly contested race even
at that early period of the season. Boston was in second position, with
Brooklyn third, this month's figures being the culmination of the
Brooklyn team's success. Pittsburgh was fourth, that being the only
Western club in the first division, although so early in the race, the
"Phillies" and the "Giants" being respectively fifth and
sixth. Cleveland headed the second division at the close of the month,
followed by Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago and Washington, Louisville
being still occupants of the last ditch.



THE JULY CAMPAIGN RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.  Contesting Clubs.            City.        Pitchers.           Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 1 Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn      Cincinnati   Chamberlain    Daub  9-7
 "   1 Louisville vs. Baltimore     Louisville   Hemming       Hawke  6-0
 "   1 Washington vs. St. Louis     St. Louis    Esper  Breitenstein  4-2
 "   1 Cleveland vs. Chicago        Chicago      Cuppy      Griffith 10-9
 "   2 New York vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Rusie      Griffith  6-4
 "   2 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Pittsburgh   Nichols       Ehret  7-2
 "   2 Philadelphia vs. Chicago     Chicago      Carsey     Stratton 17-15
 "   3 No games scheduled.
 "   4 New York vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Meekin        Cuppy  4-3
 "   4 New York vs. Cleveland.      Chicago.     Weyhing      McGill 12-11
 "   4 Baltimore vs. Louisville.    Louisville   McMahon       Knell  3-2
 "   4 Louisville vs. Baltimore.    Louisville   Hemming        Inks 11-1
 "   4 Washington vs. St. Louis.    St. Louis.   Sullivan     Hawley 10-5
 "   4 St. Louis vs. Washington.    St. Louis.   A.Clarkson   Mercer 15-8
 "   5 New York vs. Louisville.     Louisville.  Westervelt  Menafee  4-3
 "   5 Boston vs. Cleveland.        Cleveland.   Staley     Clarkson 22-7
 "   5 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh.  Carsey   Colcolough  4-3
 "   5 St. Louis vs. Brooklyn.      St. Louis.   Hawley         Daub 13-12
 "   5 Cincinnati vs. Baltimore.    Cincinnati.  Dwyer         Hawke 20-6
 "   5 Chicago vs. Washington.      Chicago.     Stratton       Maul 13-10
 "   6 New York vs. Louisville.     Louisville.  Rusie       Hemming 10-6
 "   6 Boston vs. Cleveland.        Boston.      Stivetts      Cuppy 19-6
 "   6 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh.  Haddock      Killen 13-7
 "   7 New York vs. Louisville.     Louisville.  Meekin        Knell 14-6
 "   7 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis.      St. Louis.   Kennedy Breitenst'n 10-5
 "   7 Boston vs. Cleveland.        Cleveland.   Nichols       Young 16-10
 "   7 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh.  Weyhing       Ehret 12-0
 "   7 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati.    Cincinnati.  Inks        Parrott 11-2
 "   7 Chicago vs. Washington       Chicago      Abbey      Sullivan  9-7
 "   8 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis.      St. Louis.   Stein    A.Clarkson 12-5
 "   8 Washington vs. Chicago.      Chicago.     Esper      Griffith  9-8
 "   8 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati.    Cincinnati.  McMahon Chamberlain 14-4
 "   9 New York vs. Cincinnati.     Cincinnati.  Rusie       Parrott 13-8
 "   9 Philadelphia vs. St. Louis.  St. Louis.   Callahan     Hawley 11-10
 "   9 Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh.    Pittsburgh.  Brown        Killen 14-10
 "   9 Louisville vs. Brooklyn.     Louisville.  Wadsw'th    Kennedy 20-8
 "   9 Chicago vs. Boston.          Chicago.     Stratton     Staley 18-11
 "   9 Cleveland vs. Washington.    Cleveland.   Cuppy         Esper 16-15
 "  10 Cincinnati vs. New York.     Cincinnati.  Dwyer        Meekin  7-3
 "  10 Louisville vs. Brooklyn.     Louisville.  Menafee        Daub 13-7
 "  10 Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore.    Pittsburgh.  Ehret       McMahon 19-9
 "  10 Cleveland vs. Washington.    Cleveland.   Young         Esper 23-4
 "  10 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia.  St. Louis.   Breitenst'n Haddock 17-8
 "  10 Boston vs. Chicago.          Chicago.     Stivetts     McGill 12-3
 "  11 Cincinnati vs. New York.     Cincinnati.  Parrott  Westervelt  6-5
 "  11 Louisville vs. Brooklyn.     Louisville.  Hemming       Stein  7-3
 "  11 Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore.    Pittsburgh.  Gumbert        Inks  8-6
 "  11 Chicago vs. Boston.          Chicago.     Griffith    Nichols 13-1
 "  11 Cleveland vs. Washington.    Cleveland.   Griffith  Mercer[1] 15-10
 "  11 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia.  St. Louis.   A.Clarkson  Weyhing 13-12
 "  12 New York vs. Pittsburgh.     Pittsburgh.  Rusie        Killen  9-6
 "  12 Boston vs. Cincinnati.       Cincinnati.  Stivetts      Dwyer  6-4
 "  12 Chicago vs. Brooklyn.        Chicago.     Stratton    Kennedy 11-6
 "  12 Louisville vs. Washington.   Louisville.  Knell      Sullivan  7-5
 "  12 Cleveland vs. Philadelphia.  Cleveland.   Cuppy        Carsey 20-10
 "  13 Pittsburgh vs. New York.     Pittsburgh.  Ehret    Westervelt 10-4
 "  13 St. Louis vs. Baltimore.     St. Louis.   Breitenstein  Hawke 11-10
 "  13 Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia  Cleveland    Young      Callahan 16-8
 "  13 Boston vs. Cincinnati        Cincinnati   Staley      Parrott 22-7
 "  14 New York vs. Pittsburgh      Pittsburgh   Meekin      Gumbert  9-5
 "  14 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      St. Louis    Inks         Hawley  7-3
 "  14 Brooklyn vs. Chicago         Chicago      Stein       Abbey[1] 8-8
 "  14 Cincinnati vs. Boston        Cincinnati   Cross       Nichols 14-12
 "  14 Cleveland vs. Philadelphia   Cleveland    Griffith    Weyhing 14-7
 "  14 Louisville vs. Washington    Louisville   Wadsworth     Esper  5-3
 "  15 Chicago vs. Brooklyn         Chicago      Terry     Gastright 10-7
 "  15 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      St. Louis    McMahon A.Cl'kson[2] 9-8
 "  15 Louisville vs. Washington    Louisville   Menafee      Mercer 11-8
 "  15 Cincinnati vs. Cleveland     Cincinnati   Dwyer         Cuppy 17-8
 "  16 Philadelphia vs. Boston      Philadelphia Harper     Stivitts  9-2
 "  16 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh     St. Louis    Br't'nst'n Colcol'gh 11-7
 "  16 Louisville vs. Chicago       Chicago      Hemming    Griffith 11-10
 "  16 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Young       Parrott  9-1
 "  17 New York vs. Washington      New York     Rusie          Maul  7-2
 "  17 Philadelphia vs. Boston      Philadelphia Taylor    Staley[4] 12-2
 "  17 Baltimore vs. Brooklyn       Baltimore    Gleason     Kennedy  13-4
 "  17 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Griffin       Flynn  16-7
 "  17 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis     St. Louis    Ehret         Mason  5-4
 "  17 Chicago vs. Louisville       Chicago      Stratton      Knell  8-5
 "  18 New York vs. Washington      New York     Meekin       Mercer  5-4
 "  18 Boston vs. Philadelphia      Philadelphia Nichols     Weyhing  6-5
 "  18 Baltimore vs. Brooklyn       Baltimore    Hawke     Underwood  6-2
 "  18 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Young   Chamberlain  9-4
 "  18 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh     St. Louis    Hawley      Gumbert  3-2
 "  18 Chicago vs. Louisville       Chicago      Terry     Wadsworth  8-4
 "  19 New York vs. Washington      New York     German     Sullivan 13-12
 "  19 Brooklyn vs. Baltimore       Baltimore    Stein          Inks 10-8
 "  19 Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh    Cincinnati   Dwyer    Colcolough  8-6
 "  19 St. Louis vs. Chicago        St. Louis    Breitenstein  Abbey  7-1
 "  20 Boston vs. New York          Boston       Stivetts      Rusie 12-1
 "  20 Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia    Brooklyn     Kennedy      Taylor  8-2
 "  20 Baltimore vs. Washington     Washington   Hawke         Petty 12-8
 "  20 Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh    Cincinnati   Chamberlain   Ehret  7-6
 "  20 Louisville vs. Cleveland     Louisville   Menafee     Mullane  7-4
 "  21 Boston vs. New York          Boston       Nichols      Meekin 14-3
 "  21 Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia    Brooklyn     Underwood    Herper  8-7
 "  21 Washington vs. Baltimore     Baltimore    Maul        Gleason 14-3
 "  21 Chicago vs. St. Louis        St. Louis    Stratton  Hawley[1]16-11
 "  21 Cleveland vs. Louisville     Louisville   Cuppy       Hemming  2-0
 "  21 Cleveland vs. Louisvile      Louisville   Young         Knell  9-1
 "  21 Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh    Cincinnati   Cross       Gumbert 12-4
 "  22 Cincinnati vs. Louisville    Louisville   Dwyer     Wadsworth  4-0
 "  22 Chicago vs. St. Louis        St. Louis    Griffith A.Clarkson 11-9
 "  23 Boston vs. New York          Boston       Staley       German  9-5
 "  23 Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia    Brooklyn     Stein        Taylor  7-3
 "  23 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn    Brooklyn     Weyhing        Daub 12-4
 "  23 Cincinnati vs. Louisville    Louisville   Chamberlain Menafee  9-8
 "  23 Pittsburgh vs. Chicago       Chicago      Killen     Stratton 14-6
 "  24 New York vs. Baltimore       New York     Rusie       McMahon  1-0
 "  24 Cleveland vs. St. Louis      Cleveland    Mullane Breitenst'n 12-9
 "  24 Cleveland vs. St. Louis      Cleveland    Cuppy        Hawley  4-2
 "  24 Cincinnati vs. Louisville    Louisville   Parrott     Hemming  4-3
 "  24 Chicago vs. Pittsburgh       Chicago      Hutchinson    Ehret 18-11
 "  25 New York vs. Baltimore       New York     Meekin      Gleason  7-2
 "  25 Brooklyn vs. Boston          Boston       Kennedy    Stivetts  8-7
 "  25 Boston vs. Brooklyn          Boston       Nichols   Underwood 12-6
 "  25 Washington vs. Philadelphia  Washington   Mercer      Fanning 16-6
 "  25 Philadelphia vs. Washington  Washington   Carsey     Sullivan  9-6
 "  25 Cleveland vs. St. Louis      Cleveland    Young  Breitenstein 12-3
 "  25 Chicago vs. Pittsburgh       Chicago      Griffith Colcolough 24-6
 "  26 New York vs. Baltimore       New York     German        Hawke 16-4
 "  26 Brooklyn vs. Boston          Boston       Stein        Staley 15-9
 "  26 Washington vs. Philadelphia  Washington   Maul         Taylor  5-4
 "  26 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland     Cleveland    Ehret       Mullane  9-3
 "  27 Philadelphia vs. New York    Philadelphia Harper        Rusle 13-5
 "  27 Washington vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Mercer      Kennedy  8-2
 "  27 Boston vs. Baltimore         Baltimore    Stivetts    McMahon  7-4
 "  27 Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh     Cleveland    Cuppy         Nicol  9-6
 "  27 Cincinnati vs. Chicago       Cincinnati   Dwyer      Stratton 14-12
 "  27 St. Louis vs. Louisville     St. Louis    Hawley    Wadsworth  6-4
 "  28 New York vs. Philadelphia    Philadelphia Meekin    Carsey[3] 12-11
 "  28 Brooklyn vs. Washington      Brooklyn     Underwood  Sullivan  9-5
 "  28 Boston vs. Baltimore         Baltimore    Staley      Gleason  8-4
 "  28 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland     Cleveland    Ehret         Young  8-0
 "  28 Cincinnati vs. Chicago       Cincinnati   Cross      Griffith 19-13
 "  28 Louisville vs. St. Louis     St. Louis    Hemming       Mason  8-4
 "  29 St. Louis vs. Louisville     St. Louis    Breitenst'n Menafee 13-2
 "  29 Louisville vs. St. Louis     St. Louis    Knell        Hawley  9-2
 "  29 Chicago vs.  Cincinnati      Cincinnati   Griffith    Parrott 16-9
 "  30 New York vs. Philadelphia    Philadelphia German       Taylor 13-7
 "  30 Washington vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Maul           Daub 10-6
 "  30 Boston vs. Baltimore         Baltimore    Stivetts      Hawke  5-2
 "  30 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati    Pittsburgh   Gumbert       Cross  8-6
 "  30 Cleveland vs. Louisville     Cleveland    Cuppy     Wadsworth 14-5
 "  30 Chicago vs. St. Louis        Chicago      Stratton     Hawley  8-4
 "  31 New York vs. Boston          New York     Rusie       Nichols  4-3
 "  31 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn    Philadelphia Harper      Kennedy 13-6
 "  31 Baltimore vs. Washington     Baltimore    McMahon      Mercer 11-3
 "  31 Chicago vs. St. Louis        Chicago   Hutchinson Breitenst'n  8-1
 "  31 Cleveland vs. Louisville     Cleveland    Mullane  Hemming[2] 12-10
 "  31 Louisville vs. Cleveland     Cleveland    Menafee       Young 12-4
 "  31 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati    Pittsburgh   Nicol      Dwyer[2] 11-10

[Footnote 1: Ten Innings]
[Footnote 2: Eleven innings.]
[Footnote 3: Thirteen innings.]
[Footnote 4: Forfeited.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Only one game was drawn in July.


THE JULY PENNANT RACE RECORD.
-------------------------------------------------------
                       P                          P
                   P   e                   P   e
                   l   r                   l   r
                L  a   c                L  a   c
             W  o  y   e             W  o  y   e
             o  s  e   n             o  s  e   n
Clubs.       n  t  d   t   Clubs.       n  t  d   t
-------------------------------------------------------
Boston       54 28 82 .659 Philadelphia 40 36 76 .526
Baltimore    47 29 76 .618 Cincinnati   39 41 80 .488
New York     49 31 80 .613 Chicago      34 45 79 .430
Cleveland    46 34 80 .575 St. Louis    35 60 85 .412
Brooklyn     42 35 77 .545 Louisville   27 56 83 .325
Pittsburgh   43 38 81 .531 Washington   24 57 81 .296
-------------------------------------------------------

By the end of July the Boston club had ousted Baltimore out of first
place, and the calculation now was that Boston would ultimately win. New
York had pulled up to third place this month, and from this time out
these three clubs monopolized the three leading positions in the race,
no other club from now on being regarded as in the race, as far as the
winning of the pennant was concerned. On the 31st of July two Western
clubs occupied positions in the first division--Cleveland being fourth
and Pittsburgh sixth--the Brooklyn club leading the "Pirates" by a few
points only. The "Phillies" had been forced back into the second
division, and Louisville had pushed the Washingtons into the last ditch,
the difference in percentage points between the Boston and Washington
clubs--the leader and tail-ender--being 355 points.

Now came the trying month of August, and with it came the customary
falling off in patronage, largely due to the one-sided character of the
pennant race, the chief interest in the contest for the championship now
lying in the struggle for the lead between Baltimore, New York, and
Boston, the "Bean Eaters" still leading at the end of July, followed by
Baltimore and New York.


[Illustration: Brooklyn Base Ball Club, '94.]
[Illustration: Cleveland Base Ball Club, '94.]
[Illustration: Pittsburgh Base Ball Club, '94.]
[Illustration: A.C. Anson, Chicago Base Ball Club.
   The only "Colt" Who Had a picture Taken.]



THE AUGUST CAMPAIGN RECORD

The following is the record of the August campaign, which led to a
material change in the relative positions of the twelve clubs by the
close of the month:

THE AUGUST RECORD
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.  Contesting Clubs.            City.        Pitchers.           Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aug. 1 New York vs. Boston          New York     Meekin     Staley[2]  5-4
 "   1 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn    Philadelphia Carsey         Stein  6-5
 "   1 Baltimore vs. Washington     Washington   Gleason        Stein  6-4
 "   1 Baltimore vs. Washington     Washington   Inks       Stockdale 11-4
 "   1 Chicago vs. St. Louis        Chicago      McGill        Hawley 26-8
 "   1 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati    Pittsburgh   Colcolugh     Parrot 15-5
 "   2 Boston vs. New York          New York     Nichols       German 13-13
 "   2 Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn    Philadelphia Fanning    Underwood  9-8
 "   2 Baltimore vs. Washington     Baltimore    Hawke           Maul 10-9
 "   2 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Breitenstein   Ehret  7-4
 "   2 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati     Cleveland    Cuppy    Chamberlain  9-4
 "   2 Chicago vs. Louisville       Louisville   Hutchinson     Knell  4-3
 "   3 New York vs. Brooklyn        Brooklyn     Westervelt      Daub 17-3
 "   3 Brooklyn vs. New York        Brooklyn     Kennedy       Clarke  7-6
 "   3 Philadelphia vs. Baltimore   Philadelphia Taylor         Esper 14-4
 "   3 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia McMahon      Weyhing 16-3
 "   3 Washington vs. Boston        Boston       Mercer       Nichols  8-4
 "   3 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati     Cleveland    Young          Cross 11-5
 "   3 St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Hawley    Gumbert[2]  8-6
 "   3 Louisville vs. Chicago       Louisville   Forfeited;  no game   9-0
 "   4 New York vs. Brooklyn        Brooklyn     Rusie          Stein 16-8
 "   4 New York vs. Brooklyn        Brooklyn     Meekin         Stein  9-*
 "   4 Boston vs. Washington        Boston       Stivetts    Sullivan 11-5
 "   4 Baltimore vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Gleason       Carsey 19-12
 "   4 Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis     Pittsburgh   Colcol'h  Br'tenst'n 11-5
 "   4 Cincinnati vs. Cleveland     Cleveland    Parrott        Cuppy  8-5
 "   4 Chicago vs. Louisville       Louisville   Griffith     Hemming 10-4
 "   5 Chicago vs. Cincinnati       Chicago      Griffith       Dwyer  8-1
 "   5 Lousiville vs. St. Louis     Lousiville   Wadsworth A.Clarkson  5-2
 "   6 Brooklyn vs. New York        New York     Kennedy   Westervelt 21-8
 "   6 Boston vs. Washington        Boston       Staley          Maul 15-7
 "   6 Chicago vs. Cincinnati       Chicago      Stratton       Cross 12-9
 "   6 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland     Pittsburgh   Eghret         Young 11-6
 "   6 Louisville vs. St. Louis     Louisville   Menafee       Hawley  3-1
 "   7 New York vs. Washington      Washington   Rusie         Mercer 16-8
 "   7 Baltimore vs. Brooklyn       Brooklyn     McMahon         Daub 26-5
 "   7 Brooklyn vs. Baltimore       Brooklyn     Stein           Inks 18-8
 "   7 Boston vs. Philadelphia      Boston       Nichols       Carsey 19-8
 "   7 Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Cuppy     Colcolough 10-9
 "   7 Chicago vs. Cincinnati       Chicago      Hutchinson Fischer[1]13-11
 "   7 St. Louis vs. Louisville     Louisville   Breitenstein   Knell 11-2
 "   8 Washington vs. New York      Washington   Sullivan      Meekin 12-10
 "   8 Baltimore vs. Broooklyn      Brooklyn     Gleason      Kennedy  4-1
 "   8 Baltimore vs. Brooklyn       Brooklyn     Esper    Summerville 13-5
 "   8 Philadelphia vs. Boston      Boston       Harper        Staley 18-10
 "   8 Pittsburgh vs. Cleveland     Pittsburgh   Ehret          Perry 10-3
 "   8 Cincinnati vs. Chicago       Chicago      Dwyer         McGill 14-11
 "   9 New York vs. Washington      Washington   Meekin          Maul  7-3
 "   9 Brooklyn vs. Baltimore       Brooklyn     Stein          Hawke 11-7
 "   9 Boston vs. Philadelphia      Boston       Hodson        Taylor 11-2
 "   9 Louisville vs. Pittsburgh    Pittsburgh   Hemming      Gumbert  5-4
 "   9 Chicago vs. Cincinnati       Chicago      Dwyer         McGill 14-11
 "  10 Baltimore vs. New York       Baltimore    Gleason        Rusie 12-9
 "  10 Boston vs. Brooklyn          Brooklyn     Nichols      Kennedy 12-6
 "  10 Washington vs. Philadelphia  Washington   Mercer        Carsey  4-1
 "  10 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville    Pittsburgh   Ehret      Wadsworth  9-6
 "  10 Cleveland vs. Chicago        Chicago      Young     Hutchinson  2-1
 "  11 Baltimore vs. New York       Baltimore    McMahon   Westervelt 20-1
 "  11 Boston vs. Brooklyn          Brooklyn     Lucis       Stivetts 11-10
 "  11 Philadelphia vs. Washington  Philadelphia Taylor      Sullivan 10-7
 "  11 Philadelphia vs. Washington  Philadelphia Weyhing         Maul 16-4
 "  11 Pittsburgh vs. Louisville    Pittsburgh   Gumbert      Menafee  3-2
 "  11 Cleveland vs. Chicago        Chicago      Cuppy       Stratton 11-9
 "  11 Cincinnati vs. St. Louis     Cincinnati   Fischer       Hawley  7-6
 "  12 Chicago vs. Cleveland        Chicago      Griffith       Petty 16-5
 "  12 St. Louis vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Breitenstein Parrott 12-5
 "  13 New York vs. Baltimore       Baltimore    Meekin         Hawke  5-1
 "  13 Brooklyn vs. Boston          Brooklyn     Stein         Hodson 13-5
 "  13 Chicago vs. Pittsburgh       Pittsburgh   Hutchinson     Ehret 17-14
 "  14 New York vs. St. Louis       New York     Rusie     A.Clarkson  5-4
 "  14 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Pittsburgh   Nichols      Gumbert 22-5
 "  14 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Baltimore    Gleason     Dwyer[1]  6-5
 "  14 Chicago vs. Brooklyn         Brooklyn     Stratton     Kennedy  5-1

THE AUGUST RECORD--_Continued._

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.  Contesting Clubs.            City.        Pitchers.           Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aug 14 Cleveland vs. Washington     Washington   Young     Mercer[1]  1-0
 "  14 Louisville vs. Philadelphia  Philadelphia Knell        Carsey 13-7
 "  15 St. Louis vs. New York       New York     Breitenstein German  4-3
 "  15 Brooklyn vs. Chicago        Brooklyn     Daub     Hutchinson  9-5
 "  15 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Boston       Stivetts    Ehret[2] 6-5
 "  15 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Philadelphia Taylor      Hemming 14-4
 "  15 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Baltimore    McMahon     Fischer  8-2
 "  15 Washington vs. Cleveland     Washington   Stockdale     Cuppy  7-6
 "  16 New York vs. St. Louis       New York     Meekin       Hawley 13-3
 "  16 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Boston       Staley      Menafee  6-4
 "  16 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Baltimore    Hawke       Parrott 15-6
 "  16 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Philadelphia Weyhing       Nicol 17-8
 "  16 Washington vs. Cleveland     Washington   Maul          Young  6-2
 "  16 Chicago vs. Brooklyn         Brooklyn     Griffith      Lucid  3-1
 "  17 New York vs. St. Louis       New York     Rusie    A.Clarkson  7-6
 "  17 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Philadelphia Carsey    Wadsworth 29-4
 "  17 Cleveland vs. Washington     Washington   Cuppy        Mercer  9-8
 "  18 Chicago vs. New York         New York     Stratton     German  6-4
 "  18 Chicago vs. New York         New York     Terry      Meekin[1] 5-5
 "  18 St. Louis vs. Brooklyn       Brooklyn     Breitenstein  Stein  4-0
 "  18 Cincinnati vs. Boston        Boston       Dwyer       Nichols 19-6
 "  18 Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Gleason       Ehret 17-2
 "  18 Philadelphia vs. Cleveland   Philadelphia Taylor     Sullivan 11-6
 "  18 Washington vs. Louisville    Washington   Stockdale   Hemming  6-4
 "  19 No Games Scheduled
 "  20 New York vs. Chicago         New York     Rusie      Griffith 11-3
 "  20 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Kennedy  A.Clarkson 20-4
 "  20 Philadelphia vs. Cleveland   Philadelphia Harper        Young 16-1
 "  20 Washington vs. Louisville    Washington   Maul          Knell  8-7
 "  20 Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore     Baltimore    Menafee       Esper  7-5
 "  21 New York vs. Chicago         New York     German   Hutchinson 13-11
 "  21 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis       Brooklyn     Lucid  Breitenstein 20-11
 "  21 Boston vs. Cincinnati        Boston       Staley      Fischer 18-3
 "  21 Boston vs. Cincinnati        Boston       Nichols     Parrott 28-8
 "  21 Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh     Baltimore    Hawke       Gumbert 17-11
 "  21 Philadelphia vs. Cleveland   Philadelphia Carsey        Cuppy 12-6
 "  21 Washington vs. Louisville    Washington   Mercer    Wadsworth 15-9
 "  22 New York vs. Chicago         New York     Meekin   Hutchinson  8-5
 "  22 Boston vs. Cincinnati        Boston       Nichols    Fournier  8-7
 "  22 Philadelphia vs. Baltimore   Philadelphia Taylor         Inks  3-2
 "  23 New York vs. Louisville      New York     Rusie       Hemming  8-4
 "  23 Boston vs. Cleveland         Boston       Stivetts      Young 12-10
 "  23 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh  Philadelphia Harper      Menafee  9-4
 "  23 Washington vs. Chicago       Washington   Stockdale     Terry 14-3
 "  23 St. Louis vs. Baltimore      Baltimore    Hawley      Gleason 10-6
 "  23 Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Dwyer         Stein 13-2
 "  24 New York vs. Louisville      New York     German        Knell 20-4
 "  24 Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati      Brooklyn     Kennedy     Fischer 15-9
 "  24 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      Baltimore    McMahon Breitenst'n  5-2
 "  24 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh  Philadelphia Carsey        Ehret 14-7
 "  24 Boston vs. Cleveland         Boston       Hodson        Cuppy 14-4
 "  24 Cleveland vs. Boston         Boston       Cuppy        Staley 10-8
 "  24 Chicago vs. Washington       Washington   Griffith     Mercer 10-5
 "  25 New York vs. Louisville      New York     Meekin        Nicol 18-6
 "  25 New York vs. Louisville      New York     Rusie     Wadsworth  5-1
 "  25 Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati      Brooklyn     Daub          Dwyer  5-3
 "  25 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      Baltimore    Hawke    A.Clarkson  4-3
 "  25 Boston vs. Cleveland         Boston       Hodson     Sullivan  8-3
 "  25 Philadelphia vs. Pittsburgh  Philadelphia Taylor      Gumbert 13-6
 "  25 Washington vs. Chicago       Washington   Mercer     Stratton  9-4
 "  26 No game scheduled
 "  27 Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia  Philadelphia Whitrock    Fanning 19-9
 "  27 Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia  Philadelphia Fournier     Harper  9-8
 "  27 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Baltimore    Gleason  Hutchinson 12-3
 "  28 New York vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Rusie         Young  5-1
 "  28 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Brooklyn     Kennedy     Menafee  8-2
 "  28 Philadelphia vs. Chicago     Philadelphia Taylor        Terry 16-6
 "  28 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Baltimore    McMahon     Hemming  8-2
 "  28 Washington vs. Cincinnati    Washington   Maul          Dwyer  9-7
 "  28 St. Louis vs. Boston         Boston       Hawley      Nichols  9-5
 "  29 New York vs. Cleveland       New York     Meekin        Cuppy  6-4
 "  29 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Brooklyn     Stein         Ehret 11-7
 "  29 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Baltimore    Hawke     Wadsworth  8-6
 "  29 Boston vs. St. Louis         Boston       Stivetts A.Clarkson 14-4
 "  29 Washington vs. Cincinnati    Washington   Mercer     Fournier  9-5
 "  29 Chicago vs. Philadelphia     Philadelphia Griffith     Carsey 13-6
 "  30 Cleveland vs. New York       New York     Sullivan     Clarke 13-4
 "  30 St. Louis vs. Boston         Boston       Hawley       Hodson  7-3
 "  30 Chicago vs. Philadelphia     Philadelphia Hutchinson   Harper 15-11
 "  30 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Baltimore    Gleason       Knell  9-8
 "  30 Brooklyn vs. Pittsburgh      Brooklyn     Kennedy     Gumbert 19-11
 "  30 Pittsburgh vs. Brooklyn      Brooklyn     Menafee        Daub  9-1
 "  30 Washington vs. Cincinnati    Washington   Stockdale   Fischer  8-6
 "  31 New York vs. Boston          New York     Rusie       Nichols  5-1
 "  31 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Baltimore    Esper         Young  5-1
 "  31 Philadelphia vs. Washington  Philadelphia Taylor         Maul 10-8
 "  31 Philadelphia vs. Washington  Philadelphia Weyhing       Wynne 11-5

[Footnote 1: Ten innings]
[Footnote 2: Eleven innings]

Two games were drawn in August.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Baltimore, Boston and New York led the first division clubs in the
pennant race up to August 31st, with the respective percentage figures
of .657, .645 and .639, followed by Philadelphia with .562, Brooklyn
with .533 and Cleveland with .529, only one Western club being left in
the first division, something hitherto unprecedented in League pennant
races. Pittsburgh led the second division clubs with the percentage
figures of .491 only, that club having fallen off badly in August, with
Chicago a good second, followed by Cincinnati, St. Louis, Washington and
Louisville, the "Senators" having driven the "Colonels" into the last
ditch, the Louisville figures being .302.

Here is the pennant race record up to the close of the August campaign:

AUGUST RECORD.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
                             P                               P
                        P    e                         P     e
                        l    r                         l     r
                   L    a    c                     L   a     c
               W   o    y    e                 W   o   y     e
               o   s    e    n                 o   s   e     n
Clubs.         n   t    d    t    Clubs.       n   t   d     t
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore     69  36  105  .657   Pittsburgh  52  54  106  .491
Boston        69  38  107  .645   Chicago     49  58  107  .458
New York      69  39  108  .639   Cincinnati  46  60  106  .434
Philadelphia  59  46  105  .562   St. Louis   44  63  107  .411
Brooklyn      56  49  105  .533   Washington  37  71  108  .343
Cleveland     55  49  104  .529   Louisville  32  74  106  .302
-----------------------------------------------------------------

By the close of the August campaign the Baltimore club had regained the
position in the van, and afterward they were not headed. Then began an
exciting struggle between the Boston champions and the "Giants" for
second place, but it was not until September 6th that the "Giants" led
the "Champions," and then only by the percentage figures of .652 to
.646. Baltimore leading at that date with but .676, so it will be seen
that the fight between those three was nip and tuck after the end of
August. At that time the "Phillies," the Brooklyns and the Clevelands
were struggling equally hard for fourth place, the "Phillies" leading,
with Brooklyn fifth and Cleveland sixth. By this time Washington had
comfortably buried the Louisvilles in the last ditch, and no
resurrection followed.



THE SEPTEMBER CAMPAIGN RECORD.

The feature of the last monthly campaign of the championship season was
the fight for second place between Boston and New York. When the
campaign began Baltimore led with the percentage figures of .667, and it
was an exceedingly close fight between the "Champions" and "Giants," the
former leading the latter by the percentage figures of .645 to .643 on
September 3d. The "Phillies," Brooklyns and Clevelands were the next
three in the first division, all three being in the five hundreds in
percentage points.

Here is the month's record:

THE SEPTEMBER RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date.  Contesting Clubs.            City.        Pitchers.           Score.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sept 1 New York vs. Cincinnati      New York     German     Whitrock  8-6
 "   1 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Brooklyn     Stein       Hemming  6-5
 "   1 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Brooklyn     Kennedy   Wadsworth 20-7
 "   1 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Baltimore    Gleason       Cuppy  5-2
 "   1 Philadelphia vs. St. Louis   Philadelphia Carsey       Hawley 19-9
 "   1 Washington vs. Pittsburgh    Pittsburgh   Mercer      Menafee 11-4
 "   1 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Ehret        Mercer 15-6
 "   1 Chicago vs. Boston           Chicago      Terry      Stivetts 15-6
 "   1 Cincinnati vs. New York      New York     Dwyer        Meekin  8-6
 "   1 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia   Philadelphia Breitenst'n Fanning  8-6
 "   2 No games scheduled
 "   3 New York vs. Cincinnati      New York     Meekin     Fournier 16-2
 "   3 New York vs. Cincinnati      New York     Rusie         Dwyer  6-4
 "   3 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Brooklyn     Lucid         Knell  6-4
 "   3 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Brooklyn     Daub           Inks  9-3
 "   3 Boston vs. Chicago           Boston       Staley     Griffith  5-4
 "   3 Boston vs. Chicago           Boston       Nichols  Hutchinson 11-4
 "   3 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Baltimore    Esper      Sullivan 13-2
 "   3 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Baltimore    Hawke         Young 10-3
 "   3 Philadelphia vs. St. Louis   Philadelphia Weyhing Breitenst'n  8-1
 "   3 Philadelphia vs. St. Louis   Philadelphia Jones        Hawley  6-4
 "   3 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Gumbert        Maul 22-1
 "   4 New York vs. Pittsburgh      New York     Meekin      Menafee 14-13
 "   4 Cleveland vs. Brooklyn       Brooklyn     Cuppy         Stein  8-0
 "   4 Boston vs. Louisville        Boston       Stivetts      Knell 20-11
 "   4 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Baltimore    Hemming       Terry  9-3
 "   4 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Taylor     Whitrock  6-2
 "   4 St. Louis vs. Washington     Washington   Breitenst'n Haddock 10-7
 "   5 New York vs. Pittsburgh      New York     Rusie         Ehret  4-0
 "   5 Brooklyn vs. Cleveland       Brooklyn     Kennedy       Young  2-1
 "   5 Boston vs. Louisville        Boston       Nichols   Wadsworth  7-6
 "   5 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Baltimore    Gleason  Hutchinson 12-3
 "   5 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Carsey        Dwyer 15-6
 "   5 Washington vs. St. Louis     Washington   St'kdale A.Cl'kson[1] 7-4
 "   6 New York vs. Pittsburgh      New York     Meekin      Gumbert  6-5
 "   6 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Baltimore    Hawke      Griffith 14-6
 "   6 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Weyhing     Fischer 14-7
 "   6 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Philadelphia Taylor     Whitrock 16-2
 "   6 Washington vs. St. Louis     Washington   Mercer Breitenstein 12-2
 "   6 Cleveland vs. Brooklyn       Brooklyn     Sullivan      Lucid 13-2
 "   6 Louisville vs. Boston        Boston       Inks         Staley 15-10
 "   7 No games scheduled
 "   8 Boston vs. Chicago           Chicago      Nichols  Hutchinson  3-1
 "   8 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Louisville   Gleason       Knell  6-3
 "   8 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Stein        Hawley  6-1
 "   8 Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia  Pittsburgh   Menafee     Weyhing 13-7
 "   8 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Cincinnati   Dwyer       Haddock 14-9
 "   9 St. Louis vs. Brooklyn       St. Louis    Br'tsenst'n Kennedy  7-5
 "   9 Brooklyn vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Kennedy      Hawley 11-7
 "   9 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Louisville   Hemming   Wadsworth  9-4
 "   9 Cleveland vs. Chicago        Chicago      Cuppy        McGill  9-5
 "   9 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Cincinnati   Whitrock     Mercer  4-1
 "   9 Cincinnati vs. Washington    Cincinnati   Fisher    Stockdale  7-6
 "  10 New York vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Rusie      Sullivan 13-4
 "  10 Boston vs. Chicago           Chicago      Stivetts      Terry 25-8
 "  10 Baltimore vs. Louisville     Louisville   Esper          Inks 15-6
 "  11 Cleveland vs. New York       Cleveland    Young        Meekin 13-3
 "  11 New York vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Meekin        Cuppy  9-1
 "  11 Chicago vs. Boston           Chicago      Hutchinson   Staley 17-2
 "  11 Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia  Pittsburgh   Colcolough   Taylor  9-7
 "  11 Pittsburgh vs. Philadelphia  Pittsburgh   Ehret       Johnson  9-8
 "  12 Brooklyn vs. Chicago         Chicago      Stein        McGill 12-8
 "  12 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Louisville   Carsey        Knell  5-3
 "  12 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Gleason       Dwyer 16-2
 "  12 Cleveland vs. Boston         Cleveland    Sullivan   Stivetts  9-8
 "  12 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Gumbert     Haddock  9-6
 "  13 New York vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Rusie        Hawley  7-3
 "  13 Brooklyn vs. Chicago         Chicago      Kennedy  Hutchinson  8-3
 "  13 Boston vs  Cleveland         Cleveland    Nichols       Cuppy 11-4
 "  13 Philadelphia vs. Louisville  Louisville   Weyhing   Wadsworth  5-2
 "  13 Washington vs. Pittsburgh    Pittsburgh   Mercer      Menafee 11-6
 "  14 St. Louis vs. New York       St. Louis    A.Clarkson   Meekin  1-0
 "  15 New York vs. St. Louis       St. Louis    Rusie  Breitenstein  7-2
 "  15 Boston vs. Cleveland         Cleveland    Stivetts    Wallace  7-2
 "  15 Chicago vs. Brooklyn         Chicago      Hutchinson    Lucid 10-3
 "  15 Pittsburgh vs. Washington    Pittsburgh   Gumbert   Stockdale 11-6
 "  16 Baltimore vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Gleason       Dwyer 14-3
 "  16 Cincinnati vs. Baltimore     Cincinnati   Parrott       Hawke  4-3
 "  16 Washington vs. Louisville    Louisville   Mercer         Inks  7-6
 "  16 Chicago vs. Brooklyn         Chicago      Griffith      Stein 13-5
 "  17 New York vs. Chicago         Chicago      Meekin   Hutchinson  5-2
 "  17 Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Hemming     Menafee 10-2
 "  17 Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Esper         Ehret  4-1
 "  17 Cleveland vs. Brooklyn       Cleveland    Sullivan    Kennedy 12-6
 "  17 St. Louis vs  Boston         St. Louis    Hawley      Nichols  6-5
 "  17 Louisville vs. Washington    Louisville   Knell       Haddock  7-6
 "  18 New York vs. Chicago         Chicago      Rusie         Terry  4-3
 "  18 New York vs Chicago          Chicago      Meekin     Griffith  9-6
 "  18 Cleveland vs. Brooklyn       Cleveland    Young          Daub  9-3
 "  18 Brooklyn vs. Cleveland       Cleveland    Lucid         Cuppy  7-1
 "  18 Baltimore vs. Pittsburgh     Pittsburgh   Gleason  Colcolough 15-8
 "  18 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Cincinnati   Taylor      Fischer 10-4
 "  18 Washington vs. Louisville    Louisville   Mercer    Wadsworth  9-4
 "  18 St. Louis vs. Boston         St. Louis    Br'tenst'n Stivetts  5-1
 "  19 New York vs. Chicago         Chicago      Meekin   Hutchinson  4-3
 "  19 Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati  Cincinnati   Carsey     Whitrock 12-11
 "  19 Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia  Cincinnati   Parrott     Weyhing  8-3
 "  19 St. Louis vs. Boston         St. Louis    Hawley     Stivetts  5-4
 "  20 Pittsburgh vs. New York      Pittsburgh   Menafee       Rusie 10-3
 "  20 Boston vs. Louisville        Louisville   Nichols        Inks  4-3
 "  20 Cleveland vs. Washington     Cleveland    Wallace        Boyd 14-8
 "  20 Chicago vs. Philadelphia     Chicago      Abbey       Johnson 20-4
 "  21 New York vs. Pittsburgh      Pittsburgh   Meekin     Ehret[2]  4-4
 "  21 Boston vs. Louisville        Louisville   Staley        Knell 13-6
 "  21 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      St. Louis    Hemming Breitestein  8-4
 "  21 Washington vs. Cleveland     Cleveland    Mullarky      Young  4-3
 "  21 Chicago vs. Philadelphia     Chicago      Hutchinson   Taylor 11-5
 "  22 New York vs. Pittsburgh      Pittsburgh   Rusie    Colcolough  6-2
 "  22 Pittsburgh vs. New York      Pittsburgh   Ehret        German  4-1
 "  22 Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati      Cincinnati   Stein       Fischer 11-6
 "  22 Philadelphia vs. Chicago     Chicago      Carsey        Abbey  9-6
 "  22 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      St. Louis    Esper        Hawley  6-4
 "  22 Boston vs. Louisville        Louisville   Stivetts  Wadsworth  3-2
 "  22 Louisville vs. Boston        Louisville   Inks                 6-4
 "  22 Cleveland vs. Washington     Cleveland    Sullivan   Anderson  6-5
 "  23 Brooklyn vs. Cincinnati      Cincinnati   Kennedy    Whitrock 10-9
 "  23 Cincinnati vs. Brooklyn      Cincinnati   Parrott        Daub  3-2
 "  23 Washington vs. Chicago       Chicago      Mullarky      Terry  6-5
 "  23 Chicago vs. Washington       Chicago      Griffith       Boyd 11-5
 "  23 Baltimore vs. St. Louis      St. Louis    Esper  Breitenstein 10-4
 "  24 New York vs. Louisville      Louisville   Meekin        Knell  8-7
 "  24 Boston vs. Cincinnati        Cincinnati   Stivetts    Fischer  7-4
 "  24 Cleveland vs. Baltimore      Cleveland    Cuppy       Gleason 12-7
 "  24 Pittsburgh vs. Brooklyn      Pittsburgh   Menafee       Stein 10-4
 "  24 Chicago vs. Washington       Chicago      Hutchinson Stockdle 17-5
 "  24 Philadelphia vs. St. Louis   St. Louis    Johnson  A.Clarkson 21-1
 "  25 New York vs. Louisville      Louisville   Rusie     Wadsworth 15-3
 "  25 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Cleveland    Esper         Young 14-9
 "  25 Cincinnati vs. Boston        Cincinnati   Parrott     Nichols  9-7
 "  25 Cincinnati vs. Boston        Cincinnati   Whitrock     Hodson  5-1
 "  25 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia   St. Louis    Hawley    Figgemeir 14-7
 "  25 Pittsburgh vs. Brooklyn      Pittsburgh   Jordan      Kennedy 10-7
 "  26 New York vs. Louisville      Louisville   Meekin         Inks  9-5
 "  26 Baltimore vs. Cleveland      Cleveland    Hemming       Cuppy  7-6
 "  26 Pittsburgh vs. Brooklyn      Pittsburgh   Colcolo'h   Kennedy  9-8
 "  26 St. Louis vs. Philadelphia   St. Louis    Breitestein Johnson 12-6
 "  27 New York vs. Cincinnati      Cincinnati   Clark       Fischer 11-4
 "  27 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Pittsburgh   Stivetts      Ehret  8-1
 "  27 Cleveland vs. Philadelphia   Cleveland    Young       Weyhing 26-4
 "  28 New York vs. Cincinnati      Cincinnati   German     Whitrock  9-8
 "  28 Pittsburgh vs. Boston        Pittsburgh   Gumbert     Nichols 15-9
 "  28 Cleveland vs. Philadelphia   Cleveland    Wallace      Carsey  8-6
 "  29 Cincinnati vs. New York      Cincinnati   Parrott      Meekin  7-6
 "  29 St. Louis vs. Washington     St. Louis    Hawley     Anderson  6-4
 "  29 Chicago vs. Baltimore        Chicago      Hutchinson  Gleason  5-4
 "  29 Cleveland vs. Philadelphia   Cleveland    Sullivan     Taylor 11-3
 "  29 Boston vs. Pittsburgh        Pittsburgh   Hodson      Menafee  6-5
 "  29 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Louisville   Stein         Knell 11-4
 "  30 Baltimore vs. Chicago        Chicago      Esper         Terry 20-9
 "  30 Louisville vs. Brooklyn      Louisville   Wadsworth      Daub 10-8
 "  30 Brooklyn vs. Louisville      Louisville   Stein          Inks 12-4
 "  30 St. Louis vs. Washington     St. Louis    Br'tenst'n Mullarky 14-2
 "  30 St. Louis vs. Washington     St. Louis    Hawley         Boyd 10-4
 "  30 Cleveland vs. Cincinnati     Cincinnati   Cuppy         Dwyer 16-16

[Footnote 1: Protested.]
[Footnote 2: Forfeited.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE PITCHING OF 1894.

The pitching of 1894 in the National League arena was in advance of that
of 1893, but it has yet to reach the point of perfect work in the
box. Somehow or other, managers of teams cannot get it out of their
heads that great speed is the principal factor of success in pitching,
when the fact is that speed is but an aid to success, secondary in value
to that of strategic skill in delivering the ball to the bat.

The experience of the past season in connection with the limit of speed
in pitching presents some valuable suggestions which team managers will
do well to bear in mind this year. Some years ago, the swift
pitching--which had then about reached the highest point of
speed--proved to be so costly in its wear and fear upon the catchers
that clubs had to engage a corps of reserve catchers, in order to go
through a season's campaign with any degree of success. Afterward,
however, the introduction of the protective "mitts" led to some relief
being afforded the catchers who had been called upon to face the swift
pitching of the "cyclone" pitchers of the period. The seasons of 1893
and 1894 were marked by some exhibitions of swift pitching unequaled in
the annals of the game, and yet it was not effective in placing the team
which held the cyclone pitchers in the lead. If the speed of the ball is
too great for catchers to handle, even with the protection the breast
pads, masks and the padded gloves of the period afford, why then it is
worse than useless. It was skilful, strategic pitching which helped to
win the pennant in 1894, and not "cyclone" pitching. Speed is all very
well as an important accessory, but without the best of catching to
support it, and thorough command of the ball to give it full effect, it
is more costly than otherwise.

The Pitching Percentages for 1894.



THE CHAMPION BALTIMORE CLUB'S RECORD.

The complete record of the pitching percentages of victories pitched in,
shows that Baltimore's full season's team of pitchers had a general
percentage of victories pitched in of .695 by the eight pitchers who
occupied the box during the season's campaign. This record excelled the
percentage figures of New York's team of five pitchers by 31 points, and
that of Boston's seven pitchers by 66 points, the respective percentage
figures being, .695, .664 and .629. These figures show the relative
strength of the three battery teams, as far as the record of percentage
can show them. A better criterion of pitching skill would be, of course,
at command, were the scoring rules giving the data of runs earned off
the pitching revised properly; but as they were not in 1894, we have to
take the next best data at command, that being the percentage of
victories pitched in. Taking the records of the first three pitchers
named in the Baltimore "battery" team record, as a whole, we do not
hesitate to award to McMahon the position of leading pitcher of the club
for 1894. Brown led McMahon in percentage of victories against the five
Eastern teams, but the former was last on the list against the six
Western teams, McMahon's percentage figures against the Western batsmen
being .812 against Brown's .500. Against the Eastern teams
Brown's figures were .750 to McMahon's .706. But McMahon pitched in 17
games against the Eastern batsmen, to Brown's 4 games only, and that
fact counts to McMahon's advantage. Esper stood second in percentage
figures against the Western batsmen with the percentage of .889 in 9
games to McMahon's .812 in 16 games. Gleason stood third against the
Eastern teams with .625 to McMahon's .706; but against the West, Gleason
was fourth, with the percentage of .769 to McMahon's .812. Hawke did
service against the West with .688 to .556 against the East. Inks and
Mullane stood even at .667 against the West, but Inks led Mullane by
.511 to .500 against the East, Horner only pitched in one game. Here is
a full record of the eight pitchers of the Baltimore team of 1894,
showing what each pitcher did against the Eastern and Western batsmen
separately, in victories and defeats against each club, and in
percentage of victories pitched in against the batsmen of each
section. It is a valuable record, if only in its showing what each
pitcher did in the way of victories, against each club of each division.


THE BALTIMORE CLUB'S RECORD.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS                       WESTERN CLUBS.
                    P
                    h
                    i     W                          P        C  L
                    l     a                       C  i        i  o
           W  N     a  B  s                       l  t     S  n  u
           o  e     d  r  h       P               e  t  C  t  c  i       P
BALTIMORE  n  w  B  e  o  i       e               v  s  h  .  i  s       e
           /     o  l  o  n  T    r               e  b  i  L  n  v  T    r
vs.        L  Y  s  p  k  g  o    c               l  u  c  o  n  i  o    c
           o  o  t  h  l  t  t    e               a  r  a  u  a  l  t    e
           s  r  o  i  y  o  a    n               n  g  g  i  t  l  a    n
Pitchers   t  k  n  a  n  n  l    t    Pitchers   d  h  o  s  i  e  l    t
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Brown      W  0  0  1  1  1  3  .750   Hemming    1  1  1  1  0  1  5 1.000
           L  0  1  0  0  0  1                    0  0  0  0  0  0  0
McMahon    W  2  3  2  2  3 12  .706   Esper      3  1  1  2  0  1  8  .889
           L  3  2  0  0  0  5                    0  1  0  0  0  0  1
Gleason    W  1  0  1  2  1  5  .625   McMahon    2  0  2  3  3  3 13  .811
           L  1  1  0  0  1  3                    1  2  0  0  0  0  3
Inks       W  1  0  1  0  2  4  .571   Gleason    1  2  2  3  0  2 10  .769
           L  0  0  1  2  0  3                    1  0  1  0  1  0  3
Hawke      W  0  1  0  1  3  5  .556   Hawke      1  1  3  2  2  2 11  .688
           L  2  1  0  1  0  4                    0  0  1  1  2  1  5
Mullane    W  2  0  1  1  1  5  .500   Inks       1  0  0  1  1  1  4  .667
           L  0  3  1  1  0  5                    0  1  0  0  0  1  2
Esper      W  0  0  0  1  0  1  .500   Mullane    0  0  0  1  1  0  2  .667
           L  0  0  1  0  0  1                    0  0  1  0  0  0  1
Horner     W  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   Brown      0  1  0  0  0  0  1  .500
           L  0  0  1  0  0  1                    1  0  0  0  0  0  1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen by the above table that, while Brown did not pitch in a
single victory against the two clubs standing next to Baltimore in the
race, McMahon pitched in five victories; and yet Brown's percentage
figures exceeded McMahon's by .750 to .706 against the five clubs as a
whole, owing to McMahon's pitching in five defeats, against Brown's
single defeats against the New York and Boston batsmen. Hemming's record
is A No. 1, as far as he pitched, but he did not pitch in a single game
against the Eastern teams, to the extent of a full record of innings
pitched in.

Here is the record for the whole season, showing the total percentage:

THE BALTIMORE PITCHERS' FULL RECORD.
-----------------------------------------------------------
                                              Per cent. of
Pitchers.  Victories. Defeats. Games Pitched.  Victories.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Hemming        5        0          5            1.000
Esper          9        2         11             .818
McMahon       25        8         33             .758
Gleason       15        6         21             .714
Brown          4        2          6             .667
Hawke         16        9         25             .640
Inks           8        5         13             .615
Mullane        7        6         13             .538
Horner         0        1          1             .000
-----------------------------------------------------------

These tables include all victories and defeats of the season, whether
counted or thrown out. It will be seen that only three pitchers pitched
in a majority of the games played.



THE NEW YORK CLUB'S PITCHING RECORD.

The New York club, in 1894, went through the season's campaign with the
fewest pitchers in their team of any of the twelve clubs. Moreover,
their "battery" teams of the season, as a whole, surpassed those of any
of the club's previous batteries since the club was organized. Led by
Meekin and Farrell--the champion "battery" of 1894--followed by pitchers
Rusie, Westervelt, German and Clarke, with catchers Wilson and Doyle,
the club presented battery strength sufficient to have carried the team
to the goal, but for sundry drawbacks they met with during the early
part of the championship campaign, especially during April and May. And
handicapped as they were, they managed to close the season in second
place, after brilliant rallying work during the last three months of the
campaign, when their pitchers were well backed up by better team-work
than they had at command up to July.

In giving the record of the work done by the club pitchers, we have
deemed it essential to divide the tables up into sections, showing the
work done in the box against both the Eastern and Western teams
separately, as well as the table showing the aggregate figures of the
individual percentages of victories pitched in. Thus it will be seen in
the appended table, that while Meekin's pitching was more successful
against the batsmen of the Eastern teams, Rusie excelled Meekin in
downing the batsmen of the Western teams, by a percentage of victories
of .889 against .778 for Meekin. But it should be remembered that in
pitching against the batsmen of the three leading teams in the race
opposed to them, Meekin pitched in 7 victories out of 11 games, while
Rusie only pitched in 6 victories out of 14 games. Against the three
most successful of the Western teams, too, Meekin pitched in 13
victories against Rusie's 12. Taking the season's figures as a whole,
Meekin led Rusie by the percentage figures of .783 to .735, quite a
difference in favor of Meekin. German led Westervelt against the Eastern
teams, but the latter led against the Western batsmen, and also had the
best percentage figures, in the aggregate of the season, by .498 to
German's .471; Clark being in the last ditch in all three
tables. Westervelt was a new man in the field compared to German, but he
is very likely to excel his last year's record in 1895. The best
individual records in victories pitched in by the two leaders, were
Rusie's 6 to 0 against Louisville, and Meekin's 3 to 0 against
Baltimore. German's best was 2 to 0 against Washington, and Westervelt's
was 1 to 0 against Baltimore; Clarke's best being 1 to 0 against
Philadelphia.

Here are the records of the pitchers of the team against the five
Eastern and the six Western teams for 1894:

THE SECTIONAL RECORDS.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS                       WESTERN CLUBS.
                    P
                    h
                    i     W                          P        C  L
              B     l     a                       C  i        i  o
           W  a     a  B  s                       l  t     S  n  u
           o  l     d  r  h       P               e  t  C  t  c  i       P
NEW YORK   n  t  B  e  o  i       e               v  s  h  .  i  s       e
           /  i  o  l  o  n  T    r               e  b  i  L  n  v  T    r
vs.        L  m  s  p  k  g  o    c               l  u  c  o  n  i  o    c
           o  o  t  h  l  t  t    e               a  r  a  u  a  l  t    e
           s  r  o  i  y  o  a    n               n  g  g  i  t  l  a    n
Pitchers   t  e  n  a  n  n  l    t    Pitchers   d  h  o  s  i  e  l    t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Meekin     W  3  3  1  3  4 14  .778   Russie     4  4  4  4  2  6 24  .889
           L  0  1  2  0  1  4                       0  1  0  2  0  0  3
Rusie      W  2  2  2  3  3 12  .545   Meekin     4  4  5  2  2  5 22  .783
           L  2  3  3  1  1 10                       1  0  1  1  3  0  6
German     W  1  0  1  0  2  4  .500   Westervelt 1  0  1  1  0  1  4  .571
           L  1  1  0  2  0  4                       0  1  0  1  1  0  3
Westervelt W  0  1  0  1  1  3  .333   German     0  0  1  0  2  1  4  .471
           L  2  1  2  1  0  6                       1  1  1  1  1  0  5
Clarke     W  0  0  1  0  0  1  .333   Clarke     0  0  0  0  1  0  1  .333
           L  1  0  0  1  0  2                       1  1  0  0  0  0  2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE SUMMARY.

The summary giving the full totals of the season's record entire is
appended:

------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Games     Per cent. of
PITCHERS     Victories    Defeats    Pitched    Victories
------------------------------------------------------------
Meekin          36          10         46         .783
Rusie           36          13         49         .735
Westervelt       7           9         16         .498
German           8           9         17         .471
Clarke           2           4          6         .333
------------------------------------------------------------



THE BOSTON CLUB'S PITCHING RECORD.

While the Boston team of 1893 went through the season of that year with
virtually but four pitchers to do their box work--Quarles and Coyle
pitching in but three games in 1893--the batteries of the club for 1894
included seven pitchers, two of the seven each pitching in but single
games, Nichols, Stivetts and Staley doing the brunt of the work of the
past season. Nichols did his best work against the five Eastern teams,
he being most effective against Philadelphia and Brooklyn, neither of
which clubs won a game with him in the box against them. He also took
both Cleveland and Louisville into camp without their being able to win
a single game off his pitching, the only team to strike even figures in
games against his pitching being the Cincinnatis--3 to 3, Baltimore
winning 2 out of 3 with Nichols opposed to them, and New York 2 out of
5, St. Louis also getting the same figures. Beyond question, Nichols led
the Boston pitching record of 1894, he ranking in strategic skill with
the best in the League. Stivetts excelled even Nichols against the
Western batsmen by a percentage of .763 to Nichols' .692; but against
the stronger Eastern teams Nichols led Stivetts by the percentage
figures of .756 to .417, an advantage more than off-setting the Western
figures of the two pitchers. Lovett and Hodson both excelled Stivetts
against the Eastern teams, by .714 and .500, respectively, against
Stivetts' .417; but against the Western teams, Stivetts led by .763 to
Hodson's .600 and Lovett's .500. Staley was very ineffective against the
batsmen of both sections. Lampe pitched in but one game, and that one a
defeat by Pittsburgh; Stephens pitching, too, in but one game but it was
a victory over Washington. Here are the sectional records for the season,
together with the column giving the totals of the season:


THE  SECTIONAL RECORDS.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
              EASTERN CLUBS             WESTERN CLUBS.
                    P                                                    G
                    h                                              G     r
                    i     W                P        C  L           r     a
              B     l     a             C  i        i  o           a     n
           W  a  N  a  B  s             l  t     S  n  u           n     d
           o  l  e  d  r  h       P     e  t  C  t  c  i       P   d     P
BOSTON     n  t  w  e  o  i       e     v  s  h  .  i  s       e         e
           /  i     l  o  n  T    r     e  b  i  L  n  v  T    r   T     r
vs.        L  m  Y  p  k  g  o    c     l  u  c  o  n  i  o    c   o     c
           o  o  o  h  l  t  t    e     a  r  a  u  a  l  t    e   t     e
           s  r  r  i  y  o  a    n     n  g  g  i  t  l  a    n   a     n
Pitchers   t  e  k  a  n  n  l    t     d  h  o  s  i  e  l    t   l     t
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stephens   W  0  0  0  0  1  1 1.000    0  0  0  0  0  0  0 0.000  1 1.000
           L  0  0  0  0  0  0          0  0  0  0  0  0  0        0
Nichols    W  1  3  4  4  3 15  .756    3  3  3  3  3  3 18  .692 33 .717
           L  2  2  0  0  1  5          0  2  1  2  3  0  8       12
Stivetts   W  4  1  0  1  2  8  .471    3  3  3  2  2  4 18  .763 26 .650
           L  1  1  3  3  1  9          2  0  1  2  0  0  5       14
Lovett     W  1  1  1  1  1  5  .714    0  0  0  0  1  1  2  .500  7 .636
           L  0  1  0  1  0  2          0  0  1  1  0  0  2        4
Hodson     W  0  0  1  0  0  1  .500    2  1  0  0  0  0  3  .600  4 .571
           L  0  0  0  1  0  1          0  0  0  1  1  0  2        3
Staley     W  2  1  0  0  2  5 .385     1  1  1  1  2  2  8  .371 13 .481
           L  1  2  3  1  1  8          1  1  2  0  0  2  6       14
Lampe      W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000     0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000  0 .006
           L  0  0  0  0  0  0          0  1  0  0  0  0  1        1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE PHILADELPHIA CLUB'S PITCHING RECORD.

Under the Philadelphia club's management of 1893 but three pitchers were
in the box in over 20 games each; and but two others in 10 games and
over, seven pitchers being employed during that season. In 1894, the
blunder was committed of experimenting with no less than _thirteen_
pitchers with the result of finding it difficult to reach fourth place
at the end of the race; while the club, after being in second place in
April, fell down to the second division in July. But for this error of
judgment, the team might have ended among the three leaders. Of those
who pitched in over 10 games, Taylor took a decided lead by a total
percentage of .706 to Weyhing's .548 and Carsey's .533. Of those who
pitched in less than 10 games and over 5, Harper led with .667 to
Haddock's .571. None of the other pitchers reached average
figures--.500--except Jones, who only pitched in one game, which he won
against St. Louis, while four of the thirteen did not pitch in a single
victory. Experimenting with thirteen pitchers was a costly mistake in
the management, and should not be repeated. It is bad enough to try too
many changes in the _in_ and _out_ field teams, but worse in
battery-team-experiments of this kind. Harper led in percentage of
victories with .800 against the Eastern club batsmen, while Taylor led
against those of the West with .728. The failures of the season were
Fanning, Callahan, Johnson, Turner, Burns, Figgemeir and Lukens, the
former being the only pitcher of the seven who pitched in a single
victory against the Eastern batsmen.

Here is the record in full:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                EASTERN CLUBS           WESTERN CLUBS.
                                                                         G
                                                                    G    r
                            W              P        C  L            r    a
                B           a           C  i        i  o            a    n
             W  a  N     B  s           l  t     S  n  u            n    d
             o  l  e     r  h      P    e  t  C  t  c  i       P    d    P
PHILADELPHIA n  t  w  B  o  i      e    v  s  h  .  i  s       e         e
             /  i     o  o  n  T   r    e  b  i  L  n  v  T    r    T    r
vs.          L  m  Y  s  k  g  o   c    l  u  c  o  n  i  o    c    o    c
             o  o  o  t  l  t  t   e    a  r  a  u  a  l  t    e    t    e
             s  r  r  o  y  o  a   n    n  g  g  i  t  l  a    n    a    n
Pitchers     t  e  k  n  n  n  l   t    d  h  o  s  i  e  l    t    l    t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jones        W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  1  0  0  1 1.000   1 1.000
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0        0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0
Taylor       W  3  2  2  0  3 10 .625   4  2  2  0  3  3 14  .778  24  .706
             L  0  1  1  3  1  6        1  1  1  1  0  0  4        10
Harper       W  0  1  2  1  0  4 .800   1  1  0  0  0  0  2  .500   6  .667
             L  0  0  0  1  0  1        0  0  1  0  1  0  2         3
Haddock      W  0  1  1  1  0  3 .750   0  1  0  0  0  0  1  .333   4  .571
             L  0  1  0  0  0  1        0  0  1  1  0  0  2         3
Weyhing      W  0  2  0  3  3  8 .615   0  2  1  1  2  3  9  .500  17  .548
             L  2  0  2  0  1  5        3  1  1  2  2  0  9        14
Carsey       W  1  1  1  2  2  7 .467   0  2  2  1  2  2  9  .600  16  .533
             L  1  2  3  1  1  8        2  1  1  0  0  2  6        14
Callahan     W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  1  1  0  2  .667   2  .400
             L  1  1  0  0  0  2        1  0  0  0  0  0  1         3
Fanning      W  0  0  0  1  0  1 .500   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   1  .250
             L  0  0  0  0  1  1        0  0  0  1  1  0  2         3
Johnson      W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  1  0  0  1  .250   1  .250
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0        0  1  1  1  0  0  3         3
Turner       W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0        0  0  1  0  0  0  1         1
Burns        W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  .000
             L  1  0  0  0  0  1        0  0  0  0  0  0  1*        1
Figgemeir    W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0        0  0  0  1  0  0  1         1
Lukens       W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  .000
             L  1  0  0  0  0  1        0  0  0  0  0  1  1         2
[Footnote *: Should add up to 0. [Proofreader]]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE BROOKLYN CLUB'S PITCHING RECORD.

The Brooklyn club experimented with nine pitchers in 1894, of which but
three were able to exceed the average in percentage of victories. Of the
three, Stein took the lead with the total percentage figures of .650
against Kennedy's .545, Daub being third with but .406 to his credit,
all the others pitching in less than 10 games. No less than four of the
nine failed to pitch in a single victory. Lucid did good work in the few
games he pitched in, his victory over Boston being noteworthy. But he
pitched in as many defeats against the Western teams as he did in
victories. Four of the nine were worthless for skilful, strategic
pitching.

Here is the club's total record in full:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                EASTERN CLUBS            WESTERN CLUBS.
                         P                                              G
                         h                                          G   r
                         i  W               P        C  L           r   a
                B        l  a            C  i        i  o           a   n
             W  a  N     a  s            l  t     S  n  u           n   d
             o  l  e     d  h       P    e  t  C  t  c  i      P    d   P
BROOKLYN     n  t  w  B  e  i       e    v  s  h  .  i  s      e        e
             /  i     o  l  n  T    r    e  b  i  L  n  v  T   r    T   r
vs.          L  m  Y  s  p  g  o    c    l  u  c  o  n  i  o   c    o   c
             o  o  o  t  h  t  t    e    a  r  a  u  a  l  t   e    t   e
             s  r  r  o  i  o  a    n    n  g  g  i  t  l  a   n    a   n
Pitchers     t  e  k  n  a  n  l    t    d  h  o  s  i  e  l   t    l   t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stein        W  3  2  2  2  3 12  .632   2  2  2  3  2  3 14 .667  26 .650
             L  1  3  2  1  0  7         1  1  1  1  2  1  7       14
Lucid        W  0  0  1  0  0  1 1.000   1  0  0  1  0  1  3 .500   4 .571
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  2  0  0  0  3        3
Kennedy      W  1  3  3  1  1  9  .500   2  4  2  3  2  2 15 .577  24 .545
             L  2  3  2  1  1  9         2  3  2  2  1  1 11       20
Gastright    W  0  0  0  0  2  2  .500   0  0  1  0  0  0  1 .333   3 .429
             L  1  0  0  1  0  2         0  0  1  0  1  0  2        4
Daub         W  0  0  0  1  1  2  .222   1  1  1  1  2  2  8 .500  10 .406
             L  1  1  1  2  2  7         2  1  0  1  2  2  8       15
Underwood    W  0  0  0  1  1  2  .400   0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   2 .400
             L  1  0  1  1  0  3         0  0  0  0  0  0  0        3
G. Sharrott  W  0  0  0  0  1  1  .333   0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   1 .333
             L  1  0  0  1  0  2         0  0  0  0  0  0  0        2
Sommerville  W  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
             L  1  0  0  0  0  1         0  0  0  0  0  0  0        1
Korwan       W  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
             L  0  0  0  1  0  1         0  0  0  0  0  0  0        1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE CLEVELAND CLUB'S PITCHING RECORD.

The Cleveland club's management made as great a mistake in 1894 as that
of the Philadelphia club in experimenting with too many pitchers. They
tried but six pitchers in 1892, when they won the championship of the
second half of the divided season of that year, and in 1893 put eight in
the box. But last year they engaged no less than thirteen pitchers to
experiment with, and from third place in 1893 with eight pitchers, they
ended in sixth position in 1894 with thirteen. Of those who pitched in
over 20 games, Cuppy led with the percentage figures of .568, Young
being second with .543. Of those who pitched in over 10 games and less
than 20, Sullivan led with .600, followed by John Clarkson with .533. Of
those who pitched in less than 10 games, but one reached average figures
in percentage, Menafee pitching in only one game, a victory over
Brooklyn, and Mullane in but 3, of which 2 were victories over St. Louis
and Louisville. Cuppy did fine box work against the five Western clubs
opposed to him, but he was excelled by Young against the Eastern
batsmen. Five of the thirteen failed to pitch in a single victory.

Here is the record in full:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                EASTERN CLUBS               WESTERN CLUBS.
                         P                                              G
                         h                                          G   r
                         i     W            P        C  L           r   a
                B        l     a            i        i  o           a   n
             W  a  N     a  B  s            t     S  n  u           n   d
             o  l  e     d  r  h       P    t  C  t  c  i      P    d   P
CLEVELAND    n  t  w  B  e  o  i       e    s  h  .  i  s      e        e
             /  i     o  l  o  n  T    r    b  i  L  n  v  T   r    T   r
vs.          L  m  Y  s  p  k  g  o    c    u  c  o  n  i  o   c    o   c
             o  o  o  t  h  l  t  t    e    r  a  u  a  l  t   e    t   e
             s  r  r  o  i  y  o  a    n    g  g  i  t  l  a   n    a   n
Pitchers     t  e  k  n  a  n  n  l    t    h  o  s  i  e  l   t    l   t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Menafee      W  0  0  0  0  1  0  1 1.000   0  0  1  0  0  1 .000   1 1.000
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0  1[*]      0  0  0  0  0  0        0
Mullane      W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  1  0  1  2 .667   2  .667
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  0  0  0  1        1
Sullivan     W  0  1  1  1  2  1  6  .600   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   6  .600
             L  1  1  1  1  0  0  4         0  0  0  0  0  0        0
Cuppy        W  2  0  1  1  1  2  7  .368   2  3  3  2  4 14 .778  21  .568
             L  2  4  3  0  1  2 12         2  0  0  2  0  4       16
Young        W  1  1  1  3  2  3 11  .440   1  4  3  4  2 14 .667  25  .543
             L  4  3  2  1  2  2 14         3  0  1  1  2  7       21
J. Clarkson  W  0  1  0  0  0  0  1  .167   1  2  2  1  1  7 .778   8  .533
             L  1  0  2  1  1  0  5         1  0  1  0  0  2        7
Wallace      W  0  0  0  1  0  1  2  .667   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   2  .500
             L  0  0  1  0  0  0  1         0  0  0  0  1  1        2
Griffith     W  0  0  0  1  0  1  2  .500   0  0  0  1  0  1 .500   2  .500
             L  1  1  0  0  0  0  2         0  0  0  1  0  1        2
Lyster       W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  0  1  0  1         0  0  0  0  0  0        1
Whitrock     W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  1  0  0  1         0  0  0  0  0  0        1
Knauss       W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  1  0  0  0  1        1
Fischer      W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  1  1  0  2         0  0  0  0  0  0        2
Petty        W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  .000
             L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  1  0  0  0  2        2
[Footnote *: Total should be 0. [Proofreader]]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


THE PITTSBURGH CLUB'S PITCHING RECORD.

Of the nine pitchers employed by the Pittsburgh club in 1894 only three
pitched in 20 games and over, and of this trio Killen led in percentage
figures with .583, against Gumbert's .563 and Ehret's .389. The latter's
blunders, outside of his actual box work, damaged him in his field
support and in loss of local favor, otherwise he would have probably led
in the season's record against the Eastern clubs. Gumbert led Killen by
.471 to .364 in percentage figures, Killen being the most effective
against the Western teams. Of those who pitched in 10 games and less
than 20, Colcolough did the best work, with average percentage figures
against the batsmen of both sections, with an even .500 in percentage
figures against both, Menafee being second against both with .333
each. Of those who pitched in 5 games and less than 10, Nicol took the
lead with the total figures of .667. Terry was a failure in Pittsburgh,
but did well in Chicago. Easton was the last ditch pitcher, not winning
a game. Ehret's record against Cleveland was the best of the season--not
a single lost game out of the series he pitched in. Jordan won his
single game.

Here is the record:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                EASTERN CLUBS               WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P                                               G
                        h                                          G    r
                        i     W                     C  L           r    a
               B        l     a            C        i  o           a    n
            W  a  N     a  B  s            l     S  n  u           n    d
            o  l  e     d  r  h       P    e  C  t  c  i      P    d    P
PITTSBURGH  n  t  w  B  e  o  i       e    v  h  .  i  s      e         e
            /  i     o  l  o  n  T    r    e  i  L  n  v  T   r    T    r
vs.         L  m  Y  s  p  k  g  o    c    l  c  o  n  i  o   c    o    c
            o  o  o  t  h  l  t  t    e    a  a  u  a  l  t   e    t    e
            s  r  r  o  i  y  o  a    n    n  g  i  t  l  a   n    a    n
Pitchers    t  e  k  n  a  n  n  l    t    d  o  s  i  e  l   t    l    t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jordan      W  0  0  0  0  1  0  1 1.000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   1 1.000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  0  0  0  0  0        0
Nicol       W  0  0  0  1  0  0  1 1.000   0  0  1  2  0  3 .600   4 .667
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  0  0  1  2        2
Killen      W  0  1  1  0  0  2  4  .364   1  4  1  1  3 10 .769  14 .583
            L  1  1  1  2  2  0  7         2  0  1  0  0  3       10
Gumbert     W  1  0  1  1  1  4  8  .471   0  2  2  2  4 10 .667  18 .563
            L  1  3  2  1  1  1  9         0  0  2  2  1  5       14
Colcolough  W  0  0  1  1  1  0  3  .500   0  1  1  1  1  4 .500   7 .500
            L  1  1  0  1  0  0  3         1  1  1  1  0  4        7
Ehret       W  2  2  1  1  0  2  8  .364   7  0  1  1  1 10 .556  18 .389
            L  2  2  3  3  3  1 14         0  5  2  1  0  8       22
Menafee     W  1  1  0  0  2  0  4  .333   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   4 .333
            L  1  1  2  1  1  2  8         0  0  0  0  0  0        8
Terry       W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  0  0  1  0  1        1
Easton      W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  0  0  0  1  1        1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE CHICAGO CLUB'S RECORD.

The Chicago club, in 1894, placed only seven pitchers in the box, of
which but three pitched in 20 games and over, and but two in not less
than 10 games and not less than 20. Of the three former, Griffith led
with a percentage of victories pitched in of .645 to Stratton's .643 and
Hutchinson's .471, McGill being fourth with but .240. Of those who
pitched in not less than 5 games, besides the above pitchers, Abbey led
with .333, Terry's figures being .294, the Eastern batsmen punishing him
badly. Camp pitched in but one game, and that a defeat.

Here is the club record of the pitching:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                EASTERN CLUBS               WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P                                               G
                        h                                           G   r
                        i     W               P     C  L            r   a
               B        l     a            C  i     i  o            a   n
            W  a  N     a  B  s            l  t  S  n  u            n   d
            o  l  e     d  r  h       P    e  t  t  c  i      P     d   P
CHICAGO     n  t  w  B  e  o  i       e    v  s  .  i  s      e         e
            /  i     o  l  o  n  T    r    e  b  L  n  v  T   r     T   r
vs.         L  m  Y  s  p  k  g  o    c    l  u  o  n  i  o   c     o   c
            o  o  o  t  h  l  t  t    e    a  r  u  a  l  t   e     t   e
            s  r  r  o  i  y  o  a    n    n  g  i  t  l  a   n     a   n
Pitchers    t  e  k  n  a  n  n  l    t    d  h  s  i  e  l   t     l   t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Griffith    W  1  0  2  2  2  3 10 .625    1  3  1  3  2 10  .667  20 .645
            L  1  2  1  0  1  1  6         2  1  0  1  1  5        11
Stratton    W  0  1  1  0  2  1  5 .714    0  0  2  1  1  4  .571   9 .643
            L  0  0  0  1  0  1  2         1  1  0  1  0  3         5
Hutchinson  W  2  1  1  2  1  2  9 .409    0  2  2  1  2  7  .583  16 .471
            L  3  5  2  1  2  0 13         1  2  1  1  0  5        18
Abbey       W  0  0  0  1  0  1  2 .333    0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   2 .333
            L  0  0  0  1  1  1  3         0  1  2  1  0  1         4
Terry       W  0  0  1  0  1  0  2 .143    1  1  0  0  1  3 1.000   5 .294
            L  3  3  2  1  1  2 12         0  0  0  0  0  0        12
McGill      W  0  0  0  2  0  0  2 .222    0  0  1  1  2  4  .250   6 .240
            L  2  1  2  1  1  0  7         4  2  2  2  2 12        19
Camp        W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  0  0  0  1         1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE ST. LOUIS CLUB'S RECORD.

The St. Louis club tried seven pitchers in 1894, and but one reached the
percentage average of .500 and over, and that one was Breitenstein, who
had .519; Hawley being second with .419, and A. Clarkson third with
.360, Gleason making but little effort in the St. Louis box, though he
did better in that of Baltimore, his percentage being but .250 in the
St. Louis team. Clark, Sullivan and Mason were failures, not one of them
pitching in a single victory. Here is the record:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 EASTERN CLUBS             WESTERN CLUBS.
                          P                                             G
                          h                                         G   r
                          i     W             P     C  L            r   a
                 B        l     a          C  i     i  o            a   n
              W  a  N     a  B  s          l  t     n  u            n   d
              o  l  e     d  r  h      P   e  t  C  c  i       P    d   P
ST. LOUIS     n  t  w  B  e  o  i      e   v  s  h  i  s       e        e
              /  i     o  l  o  n  T   r   e  b  i  n  v  T    r    T   r
vs.           L  m  Y  s  p  k  g  o   c   l  u  c  n  i  o    c    o   c
              o  o  o  t  h  l  t  t   e   a  r  a  a  l  t    e    t   e
              s  r  r  o  i  y  o  a   n   n  g  g  t  l  a    n    a   n
Pitchers      t  e  k  n  a  n  n  l   t   d  h  o  i  e  l    t    l   t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Breitenstein  W  1  2  1  4  3  2 13 .448  2  4  2  3  3  14 .609  27 .519
              L  5  2  8  1  2  3 16       3  2  2  2  0   9       25
Hawley        W  1  0  4  2  1  2 10 .417  1  2  2  1  2   8 .421  18 .419
              L  2  3  3  3  3  0 14       1  1  3  3  3  11       25
A. Clarkson   W  0  3  1  1  0  2  7 .438  0  0  1  1  0   2 .222   9 .360
              L  3  2  0  0  3  1  9       3  1  1  1  1   7       16
Gleason       W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000  0  0  1  0  1   2 .286   2 .250
              L  0  0  0  0  0  1  1       2  1  0  1  1   5        6
Clark         W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000  0  0  0  0  0   0 .000   0 .000
              L  0  0  0  1  0  0  1       0  0  0  0  0   0        1
Sullivan      W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000  0  0  0  0  0   0 .000   0 .000
              L  0  0  0  0  0  1  1       0  0  0  0  0   0        1
Clark         W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000  0  0  0  0  0   0 .000   0 .000
              L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0       0  1  0  0  1   2        2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE CINCINNATI CLUB'S RECORD.

It may be said of the Cincinnati club's management in 1894, that in the
multiplicity of pitchers there is much danger, or words to that
effect. Twelve pitchers were tried (including one who pitched in two
innings) with a field support of no less than eleven players, exclusive
of the pitchers who took part at times in both infield and outfield
positions, together with four catchers, an aggregate of 27 _players_ to
occupy but _nine_ positions in the game. Could blundering management go
further?  Under such circumstances is it any wonder that team-work was
impossible, while cliques of disappointed players still further weakened
the nine in nearly every game, the ultimate result being ninth place in
the race, with the added discredit of being beaten out in the race by
their old rivals, the St. Louis "Browns." But three of the twelve
pitchers took part in 20 games and over, and but one in 10 games and
less than 20, and three out of the twelve failed to win a single
game. Parrott did the most effective work against the Eastern batsmen,
and he and Dwyer were tied against the Western batsmen, but two of the
twelve pitching in more victories than defeats. The experience of the
Cincinnati "battery" teams should teach managers a lesson for 1895 in
indulging in experiments with too many pitchers.

Here is the record:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 EASTERN CLUBS             WESTERN CLUBS.
                          P                                              G
                          h                                          G   r
                          i     W               P        L           r   a
                 B        l     a            C  i        o           a   n
              W  a  N     a  B  s            l  t     S  u           n   d
              o  l  e     d  r  h       P    e  t  C  t  i      P    d   P
CINCINNATI    n  t  w  B  e  o  i       e    v  s  h  .  s      e        e
              /  i     o  l  o  n  T    r    e  b  i  L  v  T   r    T   r
vs.           L  m  Y  s  p  k  g  o    c    l  u  c  o  i  o   c    o   c
              o  o  o  t  h  l  t  t    e    a  r  a  u  l  t   e    t   e
              s  r  r  o  i  y  o  a    n    n  g  g  i  l  a   n    a   n
Pitchers      t  e  k  n  a  n  n  l    t    d  h  o  s  e  l   t    l   t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tannehill     W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  1  1  1 .500   1 .500
              L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  0  0  1  0  1        1
Dwyer         W  1  3  1  0  1  2  8  .400   1  1  3  3  2 10 .588  18 .486
              L  4  1  1  2  2  2 12         0  2  2  0  3  7       19
Parrott       W  1  2  1  2  2  2  9  .500   2  2  1  2  2  9 .474  18 .486
              L  3  1  3  0  1  1  9         2  2  2  2  2 10       19
Chamberlain   W  0  0  0  0  3  2  5  .500   0  1  1  1  2  5 .455  10 .476
              L  2  1  1  1  0  0  5         3  2  0  1  0  6       11
Cross         W  0  0  1  0  0  0  1 1.000   0  1  1  0  0  2 .333   3 .429
              L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         2  1  1  0  0  4        4
Whitrock      W  0  0  1  1  0  1  3  .375   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   3 .375
              L  0  2  0  2  1  0  5         0  0  0  0  0  0        5
Fournier      W  0  0  0  1  0  0  1  .250   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   1 .250
              L  0  1  1  0  0  1  3         0  0  0  0  0  0        3
Fischer       W  0  0  0  0  0  1  1  .100   0  0  0  1  0  1 .500   2 .167
              L  1  1  2  2  2  1  9         0  0  1  0  0  1       10
Blank         W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0        0 .000
              L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  0  0  1  0  1        1
Flynn         W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
              L  1  0  0  0  0  0  1         1  0  0  0  0  1        1[*]
Pfann         W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
              L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  0  0  0  1        1

[Footnote *: Grand Total should be 2. [Proofreader]]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE WASHINGTON CLUB'S RECORD.

The Washington club was weakened in the same manner as the Cincinnati
club, by experimenting with too many pitchers, they using a round dozen
in the box during their campaign in 1894. Of the twelve, but one
exceeded the percentage average of .500. Of those who pitched in 20
games and over there were but two, Maul leading with .423, and Mercer
following with .410. Of those who pitched in 10 games and under 20,
Esper led Stockdale and Petty, by .400 to .357 and .273, respectively.
Sullivan was a bad failure, as he only pitched in 2 victories out of 12
games. No less than five of the twelve pitchers failed to pitch in a
single victory, not even against the Western teams. Under such
circumstances the wonder is that Washington escaped the last ditch. Here
is the record:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
               EASTERN CLUBS            WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P                                               G
                        h                                           G   r
                        i                  P        C  L            r   a
               B        l               C  i        i  o            a   n
            W  a  N     a  B            l  t     S  n  u            n   d
            o  l  e     d  r      P     e  t  C  t  c  i      P     d   P
WASHINGTON  n  t  w  B  e  o      e     v  s  h  .  i  s      e         e
            /  i     o  l  o  T   r     e  b  i  L  n  v  T   r     T   r
vs.         L  m  Y  s  p  k  o   c     l  u  c  o  n  i  o   c     o   c
            o  o  o  t  h  l  t   e     a  r  a  u  a  l  t   e     t   e
            s  r  r  o  i  y  a   n     n  g  g  i  t  l  a   n     a   n
Pitchers    t  e  k  n  a  n  l   t     d  h  o  s  i  e  l   t     l   t
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mullarsky   W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    1  0  1  0  0  0  2 .667    2 .667
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  0  0  1  0  0  1         1
Maul        W  1  0  1  1  1  4 .267    1  1  1  0  2  2  7 .636   11 .423
            L  2  3  3  2  1 11         0  1  1  1  1  0  4        15
Mercer      W  0  0  2  2  1  5 .294    0  3  1  2  1  4 11 .500   16 .410
            L  4  3  1  0  4 12         4  2  1  1  2  1 11        23
Esper       W  0  0  0  1  1  2 .400    0  0  1  2  1  0  4 .400    6 .400
            L  0  0  2  1  0  3         2  2  2  0  0  1  6         9
Stockdale   W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    1  0  1  1  1  1  5 .625    5 .357
            L  2  2  0  1  0  5         0  1  1  0  1  0  3         9
Petty       W  0  1  0  0  0  1 .125    1  0  0  0  0  1  2 .667    3 .273
            L  3  1  1  0  2  7         0  0  0  0  1  0  1         8
Sullivan    W  0  1  0  0  0  1 .167    0  0  0  1  0  0  1 .167    2 .167
            L  0  1  1  2  1  5         0  1  2  0  1  1  5        10
Wynne       W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0 .000
            L  0  0  0  1  0  1         0  0  0  0  0  0  0         1
Anderson    W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  0  1  0  0  2         2
Stephens    W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0 .000
            L  0  0  1  1  1  3         0  0  0  0  0  0  0         3
Boyd        W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0         1  0  1  1  0  0  3         3
Haddock     W  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000    0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0         0  1  0  1  1  1  4         4
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



THE LOUISVILLE CLUB'S RECORD.

The Louisville club had nine pitchers in position during 1894, of which
but four pitched in 20 games and over, and but one in 10 games and less
than 20, Knell pitching in less than 20 games, with the percentage of
.241, and Stratton in less than 10, with .143, the latter doing far
better afterwards in the Chicago team. Hemming's .355 was the best
record, Menafee being second with .348, both pitching in over twenty
games.

Hemming's percentage in the Louisville team was but .355, which,
compared with his record of 1.000 in the Baltimore team, made his total
percentage .615, showing quite a difference between his support in the
Louisvilles and that in the Baltimores.

Hemming, Menafee and Inks were the most successful against the strong
teams of the Eastern division. Whitrock, Sullivan and Kilroy were
unsuccessful opponents. Here is the record:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
               EASTERN CLUBS            WESTERN CLUBS.
                        P                                             G
                        h                                         G   r
                        i     W              P        C           r   a
               B        l     a           C  i        i           a   n
            W  a  N     a  B  s           l  t     S  n           n   d
            o  l  e     d  r  h      P    e  t  C  t  c      P    d   P
LOUISVILLE  n  t  w  B  e  o  i      e    v  s  h  .  i      e        e
            /  i     o  l  o  n  T   r    e  b  i  L  n  T   r    T   r
vs.         L  m  Y  s  p  k  g  o   c    l  u  c  o  n  o   c    o   c
            o  o  o  t  h  l  t  t   e    a  r  a  u  a  t   e    t   e
            s  r  r  o  i  y  o  a   n    n  g  g  i  t  a   n    a   n
Pitchers    t  e  k  n  a  n  n  l   t    d  h  o  s  i  l   t    l   t
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hemming     W  2  0  0  1  1  0  4 .250   0  2  2  3  0  7 .429  11 .355
            L  2  4  1  2  1  2 12        3  1  2  0  2  8       20
Menafee     W  0  0  0  0  1  1  2 .286   3  1  0  1  1  6 .375   8 .348
            L  1  1  1  1  1  0  5        1  4  1  2  2 10       15
Inks        W  0  0  2  0  0  0  2 .250   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   2 .250
            L  1  1  1  0  2  1  6        0  0  0  0  0  0        6
Knell       W  0  0  0  2  0  2  4 .190   0  0  0  1  2  3 .375   7 .241
            L  3  4  4  1  3  2 17        1  1  2  1  0  5       22
Wadsworth   W  0  0  0  0  2  1  3 .200   0  0  0  1  0  1 .167   4 .190
            L  2  2  2  2  2  2 12        1  1  1  1  1  5       17
Stratton    W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  1  0  0  1 .167   1 .143
            L  1  0  1  0  0  0  2        0  1  1  1  1  4        6
Whitrock    W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  0  0        0  0  0  0  1  1        1
Sullivan    W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
            L  0  0  0  1  0  0  1        0  0  0  0  0  0        1
Kilroy      W  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0  0  0  0  0  0 .000   0 .000
            L  0  0  0  0  0  1  1        1  1  1  1  0  4        5
--------------------------------------------------------------------------




Interesting Pitching Records.


No pitching records under the scoring rules of 1894 admitted of any data
being made up from which a true criterion of the skill of the pitchers
could be arrived at; nor can there be until the rules give the figures
of "innings pitched in" and base hits made off each inning each pitcher
pitched in. There is scarcely a game in which two pitchers do not enter
the box to pitch, at least in one or two innings; but the scoring rules
do not give the figures of innings pitched in, or how many base hits
were made off each pitcher, and the result is that the total base hits
scored in the game cannot be divided up between the pitchers
correctly. A pitcher goes into the box at the outset of the game, and in
one or two innings he is badly punished. Then a substitute follows him,
and in the succeeding innings not a third of the base hits made off the
first pitcher are recorded against the substitute, and yet not a record
to show this is to be had off the data the scoring rules admit of. Here
is the pitching score which should be used in the summary of each game:

[_Copy of Yale-Princeton score of June 16, 1894_.]

PITCHING SCORE.
---------------------------------------------------------
                       CARTER.   BRADLEY.    ALTMAN.
Innings pitched in by    9          6          2
Base hits off            9          5          7
Runs earned off          3          2          3
Bases on balls by        4          2          1
Wild pitches by          0          1          1
Hit batsmen by           0          1          1
Struck out by            8          3          0
---------------------------------------------------------

Umpire--Emslie. Time of game--2 hours 5 minutes.


Not an official record, giving the data of work done in the box by the
League pitchers, furnishes any correct figures by which to judge the
good or bad work done in the box each season. We give below a series of
records which give a somewhat better idea of each pitcher's box work
than the official averages can give under the pitching rules in vogue up
to 1895. The first table gives a full, but not complete, record of the
League pitching of 1894 by those pitchers whose percentage of victories
pitched in are not less than .500. Those whose record was under .500 and
not less than .400 included the following: Inks, .478; Stratton, .476;
German, .471; Maul, .470; Hutchinson, .467; Parrott, .459; Ehret, .436;
Daub, .423; Mercer, .421; Hawley, .413, and Westervelt, .412. Of those
whose percentages were under .400 and not less than .300 were the
following: Stockdale, .375; Menafee, .351; Sullivan, .348; J. Clarkson,
.308. These were followed by McGill, .291; Terry, 278; Knell, .200, and
Wadsworth, .190. The official pitching averages, from which these
figures are taken, give no record of the pitchers who pitched in less
than 15 games during 1894, and those who pitched in 10 games and less
than 15 included pitchers having better percentages than some of those
recorded above.

Here is a record taken from the figures of the official tables, which
presents data from which a pretty fair estimate of a pitcher's ability
can be arrived at; though it is, of course, not a really correct
criterion of his box work, as it does not contain the record of the runs
earned off his pitching solely by base hits, which cannot be obtained
under the existing scoring rules:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
                               P     B
                               e     a
                               r     s
                               c     e
                               e
                            G  n     h
                            a  t     i
                            m        t   B       S
                            e  o     s   a       a
                            s  f         s       c  S
                                     o   e       r  t R
                            P  V  P  f   s   S   i  o u
                            i  i  i  f       t   f  l n
                            t  c  t      o   r   i  e s
                            c  t  c  P   n   u   c  n     F A  B A
                            h  o  h  i       c   e    S   i v  a v
                            e  r  e  t   B   k      B c   e e  t e
                            d  i  d  c   a       H  a o   l r  t r
                               e     h   l   O   i  s r   d a  i a
                            i  s  I  i   l   u   t  e e   i g  n g
                            n     n  n   s   t   s  s d   n e  g e
PITCHERS.     CLUBS.        .     .  g   .   .   .  . .   g .    .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Meekin        New York      47 .790 253 147 127  1  4 26 .798 .281
McMahon       Baltimore     34 .735 269 109  55  8  1 17 .869 .286
Rusie         New York      49 .734 253 189 204  2  4 20 .867 .275
Taylor        Philadelphia  33 .719 381  85  79  0  3 21 .796 .331
Nichols       Boston        45 .711 291 108  98  2  1 40 .856 .282
Stivetts      Boston        39 .692 306 100  73  3  4 56 .813 .336
Hawke         Baltimore     23 .652 311  58  50  5  2 12 .887 .301
Stein         Brooklyn      42 .619 280 162  72  4  3 31 .785 .260
Gumbert       Pittsburgh    31 .600 320  73  60  1  1 18 .909 .303
Gleason       Baltimore     29 .586 312  59  39  4  1 24 .841 .342
Killen        Pittsburgh    24 .583 303  83  57  1  1 14 .909 .256
Cuppy         Cleveland     37 .583 298 119  63  1  4 28 .916 .253
Carsey        Philadelphia  31 .580 314  95  40  1  3 31 .831 .277
Breitenstein  St. Louis     49 .551 280 162 138  9  3 27 .902 .229
Weyhing       Philadelphia  33 .545 324 101  79  7  1  9 .845 .168
Kennedy       Brooklyn      42 .545 302 134 101  0  5 22 .771 .300
Colcolough    Pittsburgh    15 .533 354  59  19  1  1 19 .844 .214
Young         Cleveland     47 .532 293 100 100  0  4 24 .902 .213
Chamberlain   Cincinnati    19 .526 309  78  57  3  1 10 .729 .304
Staley        Boston        25 .520 344  55  29  2  0 12 .744 .238
Esper         Baltimore     26 .500 339  59  36  0  0 16 .929 .239
Dwyer         Cincinnati    39 .500 317  97  49  0  0 32 .902 .269
Hemming       Baltimore     40 .500 295 140  75  0  2 23 .893 .256
---------------------------------------------------------------------


Here are the records, showing the batting and fielding averages
of the nine pitchers who excelled in each record:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                F A                                B A
                                i v                                a v
                            G   e e                            G   t e
                            a   l r                            a   t r
                            m   d a                            m   i a
                            e   i g                            e   n g
                            s   n e                            s   g e
   PITCHERS     CLUBS       .   g .     PITCHERS  CLUBS        .     .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Stratton     Chicago     21 .931  1. Stratton  Chicago      33 .350
2. Esper        Baltimore   26 .929  2. Nicol     Louisville   28 .348
3. Cuppy        Cleveland   37 .916  3. Mullane   Cleveland    18 .343
4. Gumbert      Pittsburgh  31 .909  4. Gleason   Baltimore    31 .341
5. Killen       Pittsburgh  24 .909  5. Inks      Baltimore    24 .337
6. Menafee      Pittsburgh  37 .904  6. Stivetts  Boston       57 .336
7. Dwyer        Cincinnati  39 .902  7. Taylor    Philadelphia 34 .331
8. Young        Cleveland   47 .902  8. Parrott   Cincinnati   59 .329
9. Breitenstein St. Louis   49 .902  9. Terry     Chicago      25 .325
---------------------------------------------------------------------


According to the above figures Stratton was the best fielding pitcher,
and Breitenstein the poorest; Stratton also excelling in base hit
averages, while in that record Terry was the tail-ender. The nine
pitchers who excelled in total stolen bases were as follows:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
PITCHERS.            CLUBS.                  Games.  Stolen Bases.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Parrott         Cincinnati                  59          5
2. Stivetts        Boston                      57          4
3. Terry           Chicago                     25          3
4. Stratton        Chicago                     33          3
5. Taylor          Philadelphia                34          3
6. Mullane         Cleveland                   18          2
7. Nicol           Louisville                  28          2
8. Inks            Baltimore                   24          1
9. Gleason         Baltimore                   31          1
---------------------------------------------------------------------


In the foregoing two tables pitchers are included who did not reach a
percentage of victories pitched in of .500; the list of these including
Inks, Stratton, German, Hutchinson, Mullane, Parrott, Maul, Ehret, Daub,
Mercer, Hawley and Westervelt, whose percentage figures were less than
.500 and not lower than .400. Of those whose percentage figures did not
reach .400 and were not lower than .300, were Stockdale, Menafee,
Sullivan and A. Clarkson; while those who were less than .300 and not
lower than .200, were McGill, Terry and Knell; Wadsworth being the
tail-ender in percentage figures with .190.

The above tables present quite an interesting pitching problem, the
puzzle being to find out which of the above pitchers did the best work
in the box in every respect, not only in pitching, but by his batting,
fielding and base running. In percentage of victories pitched in, Meekin
took the lead. In the number of batsmen struck out, Rusie excelled. In
fewest bases on balls, Staley had the lowest figures. In base hit
averages, Stivetts led; while in total sacrifice hits, Breitenstein bore
off the palm. In total runs scored, Stivetts had the largest total. In
stolen bases, Kennedy was the most successful, and yet he only stole 5
in 42 games.

Now the problem is, Which pitcher did the best average work in his
position? and we leave that for our readers to solve.

It is alleged that the reason pitchers do so little in stealing bases is
that they are too fatigued in their pitching in each inning to do much
in the active work of base running, both duties trying a player's nerves
considerably. For this reason it would be a good plan, in the order of
batting, to have a sure hitter follow each pitcher, so as to help bat
him round.



Hints to the Pitchers of 1895.


We are glad to record the fact that scientific pitching is advancing in
the League arena. Its progress, hitherto, has been slow and only step by
step, but it is making headway, and during 1894 the science of strategic
pitching made greater progress than ever before. The effective blow
given to "cyclone" pitching by the new pitching rules, which went into
effect in 1893, while it did not materially affect the strategic class
of pitchers--some of whom the new rules actually benefited--obliged the
class of pitchers who depend solely upon their dangerous speed for
success, to adopt strategic tactics to a more or less extent; and this
is why a few of the old "cyclone" pitchers--as they are
called--succeeded better than they anticipated under the change made in
the rules in 1893, which had placed them farther from the batsman than
in 1892.

It may be said, in connection with the pitching of 1894, that one thing
noticeable in the "box" work of that season was that the brainy class of
men in the position began to pay more attention to the advice of the
theorists of the game than before; and thereby they learned to realize
the fact that _strategic skill, and that equally important attribute,
thorough control of temper_, together with the avoidance of the
senseless _kicking habit_ in vogue, had more to do with success in their
position than they had previously been aware. Those of the pitching
fraternity who read up on the subject of skill in pitching, were told
that the primary elements of strategic work in the "box" included:
"First, to deceive the eye of the batsman in regard to the character of
the delivery of the ball, as to its being fast or slow. Second, to
deceive his judgment in reference to the direction of the ball when
pitched to him, as to its being high or low, or where he wants
it. Third, to watch the batsman closely so as to know just when he is
temporarily 'out of form' for making a good hit; and Fourth, to tempt
him with a ball which will be likely to go high from his bat to the
outfield and be caught."

Then again they were told that "another very effective point in
strategic pitching, is a thoroughly disguised change of pace in
delivery. This is difficult of attainment, and as a general rule it can
only be played with effect on the careless class of batsmen. Let it be
borne in mind that the pitcher who cannot control his temper is as unfit
for his position as is a quick-tempered billiard player to excel as a
winner in professional contests. Quick temper is the mortal foe of cool
judgment, and it plays the mischief with that nervy condition so
necessary in the development of skilful strategy. The pitcher must of
necessity be subject to annoyances well calculated to try a man's
temper, especially when his best efforts in pitching are rendered
useless by the blunders of incompetent fielders, but under such trying
circumstances his triumph is all the greater if he can pluck victory out
of the fire of such opposition, _by the thorough control of his
temper_." This is something only a minority of League pitchers did in
1894.



SUMMARY RECORD.


The leading pitcher of each of the twelve clubs against the six clubs of
each section, in percentage of victories pitched in, by those who
occupied the box in 10 games and over, is given in the following table:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
BALTIMORE.
  AGAINST THE EASTERN CLUBS.        AGAINST THE WESTERN CLUBS
           Percent. of                       Percent. of
Pitchers.   Victories.            Pitchers.   Victories
---------------------------------------------------------------------

McMahon        .706               McMahon        .811

NEW   YORK.
Meelin         .778               Rusie          .889

BOSTON.
Nichols        .756               Stivetts       .763

PHILADELPHIA.
Taylor         .625               Taylor         .778

BROOKLYN.
Stein          .692               Stein          .650

CLEVELAND.
Sullivan       .600               Cuppy          .778

PITTSBURGH.
Gumbert        .471               Killen         .769

CHICAGO.
Griffith       .625               Griffith       .667

ST.  LOUIS.
Breitenstein   .448               Breitenstein   .609

CINCINNATI.
Parrott        .500               Dwyer          .588

WASHINGTON.
Mercer         .294               Maul           .636

LOUISVILLE.
Hemming        .250               Hemming        .429
---------------------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that Rusie leads all the pitchers against the Western
teams and Meekin all against the Eastern teams, Rusie having the highest
individual percentage of victories against a single section.

There can be no really reliable criterion of a pitcher's skill, as judged
by the data of his averages, until the figures of runs earned off the
pitching solely by base hits, and not by base hits and stolen bases, and
the errors they lead to combined, as is the case under the defective
scoring rules in existence in 1894. To call a run scored by a
combination of base hits and stolen bases is unjust to the pitcher,
while judging his pitching by the percentage of victories pitched is
only less faulty; but the latter is the better criterion of skill than
that of earned runs, as calculated on the basis of the rules of 1894.



THE OFFICIAL AVERAGES FOR 1894.

The official averages for 1894, as prepared by Secretary Young, of the
National League, from data furnished him under the regulation scoring
rules of each year, have always been more or less defective as far as
affording a reliable criterion of play in each department of the game
was concerned, and necessarily so, owing to the faulty scoring rules in
existence up to 1895. The batting averages are more than useless, as
they fail to show the only reliable criterion of play there is, and that
is, _the percentage of runners forwarded around the bases by base hits._
The pitching averages are similarly useless, as they fail to give the
correct data for judging the percentage of runs earned off the pitching
on the basis of runs scored by base hits, and by nothing else; the
figures of earned runs, under the present defective rules, including
runs earned by a combination of base hits and stolen bases, together
with such fielding errors as base stealing leads to, a class of errors
aside from regular fielding errors. Glancing at the record of the
so-called leading batsmen since 1888, we find that the data on which the
averages are made out grew more defective each year up to 1893, when
they were improved a little. Below will be found the several headings of
the season's averages, together with the name of the so-called leading
batsman of each year, during the past seven years, beginning with 1888
and ending with 1894.

SEASON OF 1888.
------------------------------
Rank.                 1
NAME.               Anson
CLUB.               Chicago
Games Played.       134
Times at Bat.       515
Runs Scored.        101
Ave. Per Game.      0.75
First Base Hits.    177
Percentage.         .343
Total Bases.        52
Ave. Per Game.      1.88
Bases Stolen.       28
Ave. Per Game.      0.20
------------------------------

SEASON   OF   1889.
------------------------------
Rank.                 1
NAME.               Brouthers
CLUB.               Boston
Games.              126
Per cent. of
Base Hits.          .373
Stolen Bases.       22
Sacrifice Hits.     31
No. of Runs.        105
------------------------------

SEASON OF 1890.
------------------------------
Rank.               1
NAME.               Glasscock
CLUB.               New York
Position.           S. S.
Games.              124
P. c. base hits
to times at bat.    .336
------------------------------

SEASON OF 1891.
------------------------------
Rank.               1
NAME.               Hamilton
CLUB.               Philadelphia
Games Played.       133
Runs Scored.        42
Per cent.           .338
------------------------------

SEASON OF 1892.
------------------------------
Rank.               1
NAME.               Childs
CLUB.               Cleveland
Games Played.       144
Times at Bat.       552
Runs Scored.        135
Base Hits.          185
Per cent.           .335
Total Bases.        233
Sacrifice Hits.     14
Stolen Bases.       31
------------------------------

SEASON OF 1893.
------------------------------
Rank.               1
NAME.               Stenzel
CLUB.               Pittsburgh
Games Played.       51
Times at Bat.       198
Runs Scored.        56
Base Hits.          81
Per cent.           .409
Total Bases.        113
Sacrifice Hits.     12
Stolen Bases.       13
------------------------------

SEASON OF 1894.
------------------------------
Rank.               1
NAME.               Duffy
CLUB.               Boston
Games Played.       124
Times at Bat.       539
Runs Scored.        160
Base Hits.          236
Per cent.           .438
Total Bases.        372
Sacrifice Hits.     10
Stolen Bases.       49
------------------------------

Every record of the above tables is made up to encourage the mere record
batsman, the team-worker at the bat having no show given him whatever,
as there is not a figure in the averages--with the probable exception
of the "sacrifice hit" column--to show his percentage of runners
forwarded by his base hits, this being the sole criterion of effective
batting. What is wanted is a record made up in this form:

BATSMAN.
CLUB.
Games.
Per cent. per Game Runners
  Forwarded by Base Hits.
Per cent. of Base Hits to
  Times at Bat.
Per cent. of Sacrifice Hits per
  Game.
Per cent. of Runs per Game.
Per cent. of Bases Taken on
  Balls.
Per cent. of Outs on Strikes.
Per cent. of Chances Given
  for Catches.


The above record shows how the batsman excelled in forwarding runners by
his hits, together with his percentage of base hits, sacrifice hits,
runs scored, percentage of times he gave chances for outs on catches--a
record which shows the batsman's weakness in batting--percentage of outs
on strikes, and of the times he took his base on balls. The figures
showing total bases is only of more advantage to record batsmen than to
team-workers at the bat, and if left out would cause the "fungo" hitting
class of batsmen to strive to do more teamwork at the bat than they do
now. Another column might be added showing the percentage of runners
forwarded by extra base hits.

As regards the pitching averages they are equally unreliable in
affording a criterion of excellence of play in the box. How is it
possible to tell how effective a pitcher is by the figures of earned
runs as recorded under the scoring rules in vogue up to 1895? A batsman,
for instance, gets to first base by a fly ball which dropped between two
fielders running to catch the ball, a so-called base hit is scored--the
hit really giving an easy chance for a catch. This is followed by two
steals, sending the runner to third, and a single base hit sends him
home, and by the combined play an earned run off the pitching is
unjustly earned. Another instance of this kind is shown when the first
batsman is given a life by a dropped fly ball; the second is given
another life by a muffed ball from an infield hit, and the third man at
the bat is given a life by a wild throw to first base; after which three
batsmen make safe hits, and before the side is put out, three runs are
scored as earned, though the side should have been put out had the
pitcher's field support been up to even ordinary mark, the fact being
that not a single run was really earned off the pitching, yet three
earned runs are scored against the pitcher under the scoring rules "up
to date."  Other instances of the uselessness of the existing method of
making out the League averages could be readily cited, but these amply
suffice, we think.

One thing against improvement in the scoring rules is: first, the fact
that the magnates have the power to revise the amendments made by the
Committee on Rules. Another is the failure, as a rule, to appoint that
committee so as to secure an efficient working committee. But even when
this is done their good work is knocked in the head by the majority vote
of the magnates at the spring meeting. The vote should be made unanimous
in changing any rule favorably reported by the Committee.

Here are the complete official averages for 1894, as prepared by
Secretary Young, after revision of averages published last fall:



Batting  Record

OF PLAYERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PART IN FIFTEEN OR MORE
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES--SEASON OF 1894.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        P
                                                        e
                                           A            r
                                       G   t       B
                                       a       R   a    c
                                       m   B   u   s    e   T   S  S
                                       e   a   n   e    n   .   .  .
                                       s   t   s   s    t   B   H  B
NAME.         CLUB.                    .   .   .   .    .   .   .  .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Duffy      Boston                    124 539 160 236 .438 372 10 49
Turner     Philadelphia               77 347  94 147 .423 187  8 12
Thompson   Philadelphia              102 458 115 185 .403 314  8 29
Delehanty  Philadelphia              114 497 149 199 .400 283  5 29
Hamilton   Philadelphia              131 559 196 223 .398 289  7 99
Anson      Chicago                    83 347  87 137 .394 188  7 17
Kelley     Baltimore                 129 509 167 199 .391 304 19 45
Cross      Philadelphia              120 543 128 211 .388 290 16 28
Tenny      Boston                     24  80  21  31 .387  43  2  7
Holliday   Cincinnati                122 519 125 199 .383 297  4 39
Brodie     Baltimore                 129 574 132 212 .369 269 24 50
Doyle      New York                  105 425  94 157 .369 216  4 48
Keeler     Baltimore                 128 593 164 218 .367 305 16 30
Griffin    Brooklyn                  106 405 123 148 .365 209  5 48
Childs     Cleveland                 117 476 144 174 .365 227  4 20
Grady      Philadelphia               50 187  45  68 .363 100  2  3
Dahlen     Chicago                   121 508 150 184 .362 289 10 49
Ryan       Chicago                   108 481 133 173 .359 233  8 12
Burns      Brooklyn                  126 513 107 184 .358 261  9 29
Burkett    Cleveland                 124 518 134 185 .357 267 10 32
McKean     Cleveland                 130 561 115 199 .354 281 11 32
Smith      Pittsburgh                125 497 129 175 .352 267 10 37
Stenzel    Pittsburgh                131 523 148 184 .351 303  5 60
Earle      Brooklyn and Louisville    33 114  23  40 .350  47  4  5
Stratton   Chicago and Louisville     33 134  39  47 .350  77  0  8
McCarthy   Boston                    126 536 118 187 .349 266  9 40
Nicol      Louisville                 28 112  12  39 .348  53  1  2
Robinson   Baltimore                 106 420  71 146 .348 182 11 13
Davis      New York                  124 492 124 170 .345 267  9 37
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        P
                                                        e
                                           A            r
                                       G   t       B
                                       a       R   a    c
                                       m   B   u   s    e   T   S  S
                                       e   a   n   e    n   .   .  .
                                       s   t   s   s    t   B   H  B
NAME.         CLUB.                    .   .   .   .    .   .   .  .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Brouthers  Baltimore                 123 528 137 182 .344 287 18 40
Joyce      Washington                 98 357 103 124 .344 230  5 23
Beckley    Pittsburgh                132 534 122 184 .344 284 22 20
Clements   Philadelphia               47 172  26  59 .343  85  3 04
Mullane    Baltimore and Cleveland    18  67   3  23 .343  27  1  2
Gleason    Baltimore and St. Louis    31 111  24  38 .342  55  4  1
Miller     St. Louis                 125 480  93 164 .341 223  8 20
Lowe       Boston                    133 615 585 210 .341 323  9 25
McGraw     Baltimore                 123 515 115 175 .340 221 14 77
Daly       Brooklyn                  123 494 135 167 .338 237  4 53
Inks       Baltimore and Louisville   24  89  12  27 .337  30  1  1
Sullivan   Washington & Philadelphia  93 374  72 126 .337 166  7 15
Connaughton Boston                    38 166  38  56 .337  76  1  2
Bannon     Boston                    127 496 130 167 .336 257  6 42
Stivetts   Boston                     57 244  56  82 .336 133  3  4
Treadway   Brooklyn                  122 482 124 162 .336 254 12 29
Sugden     Pittsburgh                 39 141  24  47 .333  70  6  3
VanHaltren New York                  139 531 110 177 .333 231 13 44
Jennings   Baltimore                 128 505 136 168 .332 246 18 36
Taylor     Philadelphia               34 145  21  48 .331  63  0  3
Wilmot     Chicago                   135 606 137 201 .331 294 14 76
LaChance   Brooklyn                   65 258  47  85 .329 129  3 25
Wilson     New York                   45 179  37  59 .329  77  2  9
Parrott    Cincinnati                 59 228  50  75 .329 126  1  5
Tucker     Boston                    122 503 112 165 .328 212  2 19
Hallman    Philadelphia              119 519 111 170 .327 207 22 27
Hassamer   Washington                116 493 106 161 .326 243 10 15
Lange      Chicago                   112 447  87 145 .324 119  4 71
Long       Boston                    103 475 136 154 .324 240  8 25
Terry      Chicago                    25  96  19  31 .323  39  0  3
Hutchinson Chicago                    34 133  28  43 .323  64  2  1
McPhee     Cincinnati                128 481 113 154 .320 230  6 31
Shock      Brooklyn                   63 237  46  76 .320  94  8 18
O'Connor   Cleveland                  80 324  67 105 .320 146  4 13
Abbey      Washington                129 521  95 166 .318 243 13 30
Kittredge  Chicago                    50 167  36  53 .317  65  5  2
Twineham   St. Louis                  31 127  22  40 .314  50  1  2
Connor     New York and St. Louis    121 462  93 145 .313 253  6 15
Latham     Cincinnati                130 532 132 167 .313 233 11 62
Hoy        Cincinnati                128 506 118 158 .312 241 11 30
Hartman    Pittsburgh                 49 186  41  58 .311  82  8 12
Lyons      Pittsburgh                 72 254  51  79 .311 113 11 17
Foutz      Brooklyn                   73 296  41  92 .310 126  8 16
Decker     Chicago                    89 391  76 121 .309 177  2 22
Vaughn     Cincinnati                 67 275  48  85 .309 145  2  6
Selbach    Washington                 96 372  70 115 .309 188  3 23
Stockdale  Washington                 19  75   9  23 .306  25  1  2
Donovan    Pittsburgh                133 575 146 176 .306 230 26 51
Reitz      Baltimore                 109 450  86 138 .306 226  7 18
Ely        St. Louis                 127 508  85 155 .305 237 13 23
O. Tebeau  Cleveland                 119 501  79 153 .305 200  9 27
McGuire    Washington                102 427  67 130 .304 176  4 11
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        P
                                                        e
                                           A            r
                                       G   t       B
                                       a       R   a    c
                                       m   B   u   s    e   T   S  S
                                       e   a   n   e    n   .   .  .
                                       s   t   s   s    t   B   H  B
NAME.         CLUB.                    .   .   .   .    .   .   .  .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Chamberlain   Cincinnati               20  69  10  21 .304  36  3  1
Ward          Washington               89 343  85 104 .303 130  5 36
Gumbert       Pittsburgh               33 112  18  34 .303  52  1  1
Corcoran      Brooklyn                129 573 124 173 .302 251 10 33
Irwin         Chicago                 130 503  85 152 .302 220  4 34
Bierbauer     Pittsburgh              131 527  88 159 .301 217 20 20
Anderson      Brooklyn                 16  63  13  19 .301  29  1  7
Bonner        Baltimore                27 113  26  34 .301  46  2 11
Hawke         Baltimore                25  93  12  28 .301  37  5  2
German        New York                 19  60   8  18 .300  19  2  1
Merritt       Boston and Cincinnati    66 243  38  73 .300 100  1  5
Shindle       Brooklyn                117 476  96 143 .300 201 17 18
Kennedy       Brooklyn                 42 160  22  48 .300  61  6  5
Burke         New York                138 575 124 172 .299 225 10 47
Cooley        St. Louis                52 207  35  62 .299  71  6  8
Kinslow       Brooklyn                 61 221  38  66 .298  91  2  6
McAleer       Cleveland                64 251  36  75 .298  99  5 17
Pfeffer       Louisville              104 420  66 125 .297 182 15 33
Flaherty      Louisville               38 149  15  44 .295  55  1  2
Dungan        Louisville and Chicago   18  71  11  20 .295  23  1  3
Mercer        Washington               43 163  29  48 .294  61  1 10
Nash          Boston                  132 510 132 150 .294 212  3 19
Canavan       Cincinnati              100 362  81 106 .293 201  5 15
Lake          Louisville               16  41   8  12 .292  18  0  2
Cartwright    Washington              132 509  86 149 .292 238  3 35
Boyle         Philadelphia            116 512 103 150 .291 203 18 22
Grimm         Louisville              107 413  65 120 .290 182  8 14
Smith         Louisville               39 135  27  39 .288  56  1 13
Blake         Cleveland                73 300  51  86 .286 113 10  1
McMahon       Baltimore                34 129  17  37 .286  46  8  1
Shugart       Pittsburgh              133 533 103 152 .285 236 13 23
Knell         Louisville               31 119  10  34 .285  47  1  2
Zimmer        Cleveland                88 340  55  97 .285 141  2 15
Fuller        New York                 95 378  82 107 .283 138  0 34
Glasscock     Pittsburgh               86 332  47  94 .283 123 13 20
Nichols       Boston                   45 170  40  48 .282  64  2  1
Tiernan       New York                112 429  87 121 .282 184  6 26
Farrell       New York                112 404  50 114 .282 175  3 10
Meekin        New York                 48 174  26  49 .281  80  1  4
Ganzel        Boston                   65 266  52  74 .278  98  4  1
Carsey        Philadelphia             32 126  31  35 .277  40  1  3
Rusie         New York                 49 185  20  51 .275  74  2  4
Shiebeck      Pittsburgh & Washington  75 294  69  81 .275 102  1 19
Clark         Louisville               76 316  55  87 .275 132  1 24
Peitz         St. Louis               100 364  62 100 .274 159  7 17
Quinn         St. Louis               106 411  58 113 .274 142 13 26
Denny         Louisville               60 222  26  61 .274  87  6 10
Hawley        St. Louis                48 161  16  44 .273  68  5  1
Reilly        Philadelphia             36 132  21  37 .272  42  1  6
O'Rourke      Louisville & St. Louis   80 316  60  86 .272 106  6 11
McGarr        Cleveland               127 522  94 142 .272 185  5 34
Murphy        New York                 73 284  65  77 .271  89  2 25
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        P
                                                        e
                                            A           r
                                        G   t       B
                                        a       R   a   c
                                        m   B   u   s   e    T  S  S
                                        e   a   n   e   n    .  .  .
                                        s   t   s   s   t    B  H  B
NAME.        CLUB.                      .   .   .   .   .    .  .  .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Ryan         Boston                    49 203  39  55 .271  87  1  4
Virtue       Cleveland                 23  85  15  23 .270  80  2  1
Clarke       Baltimore                 27 100  18  27 .270  40  3  1
Dwyer        Cincinnati                49 171  32  46 .269  72  0  0
Schriver     Chicago                   94 356  56  96 .269 123  5  9
Dailey       Brooklyn                  65 230  39  62 .269  89  6  4
Murphy       Cincinnati                76 265  42  71 .268  89  6  5
Dowd         St. Louis                123 524  92 141 .267 185  9 34
McCarthy     Cincinnati                40 168  29  45 .267  60  4  3
Smith        Cincinnati               128 492  73 131 .266 207  3 12
G. Tebeau    Washington and Cleveland 105 398  77 106 .266 147 11 34
Twitchell    Louisville                51 211  28  56 .265  86  9  9
Comiskey     Cincinnati                59 230  26  61 .265  73  4  9
Hogan        St. Louis                 29 103  11  27 .262  37  3  7
Ward         New York                 136 552  99 145 .262 168 20 41
Stein        Brooklyn                  41 142  31  37 .260  59  4  3
Mack         Pittsburgh                63 229  32  59 .257  70 14  9
Killen       Pittsburgh                24  82  14  21 .256  26  1  1
Hemming      Louisville and Baltimore  38 152  23  39 .256  67  0  2
Richardson   Louisville               116 427  50 109 .255 134  4 11
Ewing        Cleveland                 53 212  32  54 .255  82  2 19
Allen        Philadelphia              40 154  27  39 .253  60  3  5
Cuppy        Cleveland                 41 134  28  34 .253  47  1  4
Buckley      St. Louis & Philadelphia  67 251  24  64 .251  87 18  0
Brown        Louisville               130 542 123 136 .251 213 14 74
Weaver       Louisville & Pittsburgh   90 355  35  89 .250 119 12  9
Frank        St. Louis                 80 321  53  89 .246 130 12 12
Parrott      Chicago                  126 532  83 130 .244 175  9 34
Griffith     Chicago                   41 139  29  34 .244  44  0  6
Wadsworth    Louisville                23  74   9  18 .243  25  1  0
Esper        Washington and Baltimore  25  96  16  23 .239  35  0  0
Staley       Boston                    25  88  12  21 .238  31  2  0
Wittrock     Cincinnati                18  64   8  15 .234  17  0  0
Gilbert      Brooklyn and Louisville   34 133  14  31 .233  39  1  3
Maul         Washington                35 120  23  28 .233  42  1  1
Radford      Washington                93 330  61  77 .233 101  6 26
Breitenstein St. Louis                 53 179  27  41 .229  53  9  3
McGill       Chicago                   23  83  11  19 .229  24  1  1
Sullivan     Washington and Cleveland  26 101  10  23 .228  33  0  0
Daub         Brooklyn                  28  97  13  22 .226  26  4  1
Dugdale      Washington                33 129  15  28 .217  38  0  6
Colcolough   Pittsburgh                19  70  10  15 .214  21  1  1
Young        Cleveland                 48 183  24  40 .213  61  0  4
Motz         Cincinnati                18  68   8  14 .205  19  0  1
Clarkson     Cleveland                 16  54   7  11 .204  14  4  0
Menafee      Louisville & Pittsburgh   37 125  12  25 .200  31 10  4
Lutenburg    Louisville                70 255  44  49 .192  66  3 10
Clarkson     St. Louis                 26  85  11  16 .188  16  0  1
Ehret        Pittsburgh                41 133   6  23 .172  30 10  0
Weyhing      Philadelphia              33 119   9  20 .168  26  7  1
Westervelt   New York                  18  59   9   9 .152  11  2  1
---------------------------------------------------------------------

[Illustration: Cincinnati Base Ball Club, '94.]
[Illustration: St. Louis Base Ball Club, '94.]
[Illustration: Washington Base Ball Club, '94.]
[Illustration: The League's Leading Players, 1894.]


Fielding Record, 1894.
------------------------

FIRST BASEMEN.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 P
                                                 u    A       C   P
                                                 t    s  E    h   e
                                             G        s  r  T a   r
                                             a   O    i  r  o n   c
                                             m   u    s  o  t c   e
                                             e   t    t  r  a e   n
                                             s   s    s  s  l s   t
RANK. NAME.      CLUB.                       .   .    .  .    .   .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Motz       Cincinnati                 18  185  18  1  204 .995
  2   Anson      Chicago                    83  748  45  9  802 .988
  3   Tucker     Boston                    122 1114  70 19 1203 .984
  4   O. Tebeau  Cleveland                 107 1025  47 18 1090 .983
  5   Boyle      Philadelphia              116  983  64 20 1067 .981
  6   Vaughn     Cincinnati                 19  186  11  4  201 .980
      Cartright  Washington                132 1227  72 36 1335 .980
  7   Foutz      Brooklyn                   73  659  36 15  710 .979
  8   Beckley    Pittsburgh                132 1236  82 31 1349 .977
      La Chance  Brooklyn                   56  503  13 12  528 .977
  9   Connor     New York and St. Louis    120 1084  81 28 1193 .976
      Decker     Chicago                    48  433  16 11  460 .976
 10   Lutenburg  Louisville                 68  595  34 16  645 .975
      Brouthers  Baltimore                 123 1180  65 31 1276 .975
 11   Comiskey   Cincinnati                 59  558  26 16  600 .973
      O'Rourke   Louisville, Wash., St. L.  30  270  22  8  300 .973
 12   Doyle      New York                   99  987  60 33 1080 .969
      McCarthy   Cincinnati                 15  146  13  5  164 .969
 13   G. Tebeau  Washington, Cleveland      16  161   2  9  172 .948
---------------------------------------------------------------------


SECOND BASEMEN.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 P
                                                 u    A       C   P
                                                 t    s  E    h   e
                                             G        s  r  T a   r
                                             a   O    i  r  o n   c
                                             m   u    s  o  t c   e
                                             e   t    t  r  a e   n
                                             s   s    s  s  l s   t
RANK. NAME.      CLUB.                       .   .    .  .    .   .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Reitz      Baltimore                 100  252 344 21  627 .966
  2   Quinn      St. Louis                 106  344 342 33  719 .954
  3   McPhee     Cincinnati                128  391 449 53  893 .940
  4   Pfeffer    Louisville                 89  264 283 35  582 .939
  5   Bierbauer  Pittsburgh                131  308 462 52  822 .936
  6   Hallman    Philadelphia              119  314 342 47  703 .933
  7   Lowe       Boston                    132  354 411 57  822 .930
  8   Parrott    Chicago                   125  291 384 52  727 .928
  9   Childs     Cleveland                 117  308 380 56  744 .924
 10   Ward       New York                  136  332 455 67  854 .921
 11   Grimm      Louisville                 24   59  75 12  146 .918
 12   Ward       Washington                 79  175 237 40  452 .911
 13   Bonner     Baltimore                  24   57  54 10  121 .909
 14   Daly       Brooklyn                  128  320 358 74  752 .901
 15   Radford    Washington                 21   62  60 14  136 .897
 16   Miller     St. Louis                  18   31  49 11   91 .879
---------------------------------------------------------------------


THIRD BASEMEN.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 P
                                                 u    A       C   P
                                                 t    s  E    h   e
                                             G        s  r  T a   r
                                             a   O    i  r  o n   c
                                             m   u    s  o  t c   e
                                             e   t    t  r  a e   n
                                             s   s    s  s  l s   t
RANK. NAME.      CLUB.                       .   .    .  .    .   .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Nash       Boston                    132  199 271 34  504 .932
  2   McGarr     Cleveland                 127  171 246 35  452 .922
  3   Cross      Philadelphia              100  177 240 40  457 .91*
  4   Davis      New York                  124  154 251 40  445 .916
  5   Dahlen     Chicago                    55   95 127 23  245 .906
  6   Lyons      Pittsburgh                 72  120 158 30  308 .902
  7   Peitz      St. Louis                  43   61  69 15  145 .896
  8   McGarr     Baltimore                 117  130 246 44  420 .895
  9   Shindle      Brooklyn                117  190 232 50  472 .894
 10   Reilly       Philadelphia             27   35  55 12  102 .882
 11   Flaherty     Louisville               38   43  75 16  134 .880
 12   Hartman      Pittsburgh               49   65  96 23  184 .875
 13   Hassamer     Washington               30   64  79 21  164 .872
 14   Latham       Cincinnati              129  163 256 64  483 .867
 15   Denny        Louisville               60   84 124 32  240 .866
 16   Joyce        Washington               98  151 184 52  387 .865
 17   Miller       St. Louis                52   71  97 33  201 .835
 18   Irwin        Chicago                  68   90 125 43  258 .833
 19   Gilbert      Brooklyn and Louisville  31   56  61 24  141 .829
 20   O'Rourke     Louisville, Wash., St.L. 21   30  39 15   84 .821
---------------------------------------------------------------------


SHORT STOPS.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 P
                                                 u    A       C   P
                                                 t    s  E    h   e
                                             G        s  r  T a   r
                                             a   O    i  r  o n   c
                                             m   u    s  o  t c   e
                                             e   t    t  r  a e   n
                                             s   s    s  s  l s   t
RANK. NAME.      CLUB.                       .   .    .  .    .   .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Glasscock    Pittsburgh               86  195 300 35  530 .934
  2   Jennings     Baltimore               128  307 497 62  866 .928
  3   Richardson   Louisville              107  236 363 50  649 .923
  4   Smith        Cincinnati              128  234 523 72  829 .913
  4   Corcoran     Brooklyn                129  282 446 69  797 .913
  5   McKean       Cleveland               130  278 401 66  745 .911
  6   Allen        Philadelphia             40   93 130 23  246 .907
  7   Connaughton  Boston                   32   60 105 18  183 .901
  8   Ely          St. Louis               127  279 444 82  805 .898
  9   Dahlen       Chicago                  66  191 257 52  500 .896
 10   Long         Boston                   99  223 371 71  665 .893
 11   Sullivan     Washington and Phila.    83  199 232 52  483 .892
 11   Irwin        Chicago                  62  122 219 41  382 .892
 12   Murphy       New York                 48  112 148 34  294 .884
 13   Shiebeck     Pittsburgh and Wash.     62  130 230 48  408 .882
 14   Fuller       New York                 91  211 309 71  591 .879
 15   Pfeffer      Louisville               15   30  63 13  106 .877
 16   Radford      Washington               47  127 184 53  364 .851
 17   Selbach      Washington               18   52  52 23  127 .818
---------------------------------------------------------------------


OUTFIELDERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 P
                                                 u    A       C   P
                                                 t    s  E    h   e
                                             G        s  r  T a   r
                                             a   O    i  r  o n   c
                                             m   u    s  o  t c   e
                                             e   t    t  r  a e   n
                                             s   s    s  s  l s   t
RANK. NAME.      CLUB.                       .   .    .  .    .   .
---------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Dungan       Louisville and Chicago   18   30   3  1   34 .970
  2   Griffin      Brooklyn                106  298  13 12  323 .963
  3   Hamilton     Philadelphia            131  363  16 15  394 .961
  3   Thompson     Philadelphia            102  163  11  7  181 .961
  4   Weaver       Louisville and Pitts.    35   59   8  3   70 .957
  5   McAleer      Cleveland                64  173  10  9  192 .953
  6   Kelley       Baltimore               129  274  19 15  308 .951
  7   Brodie       Baltimore               129  311  11 19  341 .944
  8   Shock        Brooklyn                 34   89  11  6  106 .943
  9   Burns        Brooklyn                126  212  16 14  242 .942
 10   Hogan        St. Louis                29   43   5  3   51 .941
 11   Blake        Cleveland                73  122  17  9  148 .939
 11   O'Connor     Cleveland                31   85   8  6   99 .939
 12   Delehanty    Philadelphia             85  224  21 16  261 .938
 13   Smith        Pittsburgh              125  271  18 20  309 .935
 14   Tiernan      New York                112  170  11 13  194 .933
 15   Donovan      Pittsburgh              133  267  24 21  312 .932
16   Dowd         St. Louis               115  201  16 16  233 .931
 17   Keeler       Baltimore               127  220  27 19  266 .928
 18   Radford      Washington               22   30   8  3   41 .927
 19   Ewing        Cleveland                52   91   7  8  106 .924
 19   Selbach      Washington               76  153   7 13  173 .924
 20   Duffy        Boston                  123  313  23 28  364 .923
 21   Burke        New York                138  269  16 23  308 .922
 22   Stenzel      Pittsburgh              131  317  22 30  369 .918
 22   Canavan      Cincinnati               94  191  10 18  219 .918
 23   Holliday     Cincinnati              121  247  26 25  298 .916
 24   Brown        Louisville              130  327  23 33  383 .914
 24   McCarthy     Cincinnati               25   46   7  5   58 .914
 25   Burkett      Cleveland               124  242  18 24  284 .912
 26   VanHaltren   New York                139  309  28 33  370 .911
 26   Shugart      St. Louis               119  276  23 27  326 .911
 27   Abbey        Washington              129  341  26 36  403 .910
 27   Hassamer     Washington               68  102  10 11  123 .910
 28   Turner       Philadelphia             77  143   7 15  165 .909
 29   McCarthy     Boston                  124  286  30 32  348 .908
 30   Smith        Louisville               39   64   2  7   73 .904
 30   Ryan         Chicago                 108  222  23 26  271 .904
 31   Lange        Chicago                 110  278  30 33  341 .903
 32   Twitchell    Louisville               51  104  14 13  131 .900
 33   Hoy          Cincinnati              128  322  27 41  390 .895
 34   Treadway     Brooklyn                122  274  20 36  330 .891
 35   Clark        Louisville               76  166  14 23  203 .886
 36   Frank        St. Louis                77  159  11 23  193 .880
 37   G. Tebeau    Wash'n and Cleveland     87  182   8 26  216 .879
 38   Murphy       New York                 20   32   3  5   40 .875
 38   Virtue       Cleveland                20   38   4  6   48 .875
 39   Bannon       Boston                  127  243  42 41  326 .874
 40   Wilmont      Chicago                 135  262  17 46  325 .858
 41   O'Rourke     Louisville, Wash., St.L. 18   34   2  6   42 .857
 42   Decker       Chicago                  30   55   9 11   75 .853
 43   Cooley       St. Louis                38   73   1 14   88 .840
 44   Nicol        Louisville               26   33   3  7   43 .837
 45   Anderson     Brooklyn                 15   21   0  6   27 .777
---------------------------------------------------------------------



CATCHERS' AVERAGES.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               P         P    T
                                               u   A     a    o C   P
                                               t   s  E  s    t h   e
                                            G      s  r  s B  a a   r
                                            a  O   i  r  e a  l n   c
                                            m  u   s  o  d l    c   e
                                            e  t   t  r    l    e   n
                                            s  s   s  s    s    s   t
RANK. NAME.      CLUB.                      .  .   .  .    .    .   .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Zimmer     Cleveland                 88 285 107 16  13  421 .931
  2   Clements   Philadelphia              47 182  38 11   7  238 .924
  3   Buckley    Philadelphia, St. Louis   66 249  72 18  12  351 .914
  3   Robinson   Baltimore                106 364  96 24  19  503 .914
  4   Mack       Pittsburgh                63 274  59 22  15  370 .900
  5   Merritt    Boston, Pitts., Cinn      61 177  72 16  13  278 .895
  6   Schriver   Chicago                   86 294  93 34  13  434 .891
  7   Grimm      Louisville                75 262 104 29  16  411 .890
  8   Miller     St. Louis                 39 138  36 12  10  196 .887
      Murphy     Cincinnati                74 197  69 29   5  300 .887
      Farrell    New York                 103 470 138 41  36  685 .887
  9   Kittredge  Chicago                   50 209  40 20  13  282 .883
 10   Vaughn     Cincinnati                41 155  43 19   8  225 .880
      Dailey     Brooklyn                  58 217  62 21  17  317 .880
 11   Ganzel     Boston                    55 188  57 24  10  279 .878
 12   Sugden     Pittsburgh                30 104  28 12   7  151 .874
 13   Earle      Brooklyn and Lousiville   31  89  42  6  13  150 .873
 14   Twineham   St. Louis                 31 147  35  9  18  209 .870
 15   O'Connor   Cleveland                 42 160  37 12  20  229 .860
 16   McGuire    Washington               102 288 116 39  28  471 .857
 17   Clarke     Baltimore                 22  86  21 10   8  125 .856
      Ryan       Boston                    49 166  49 18  18  251 .856
 18   Peitz      St. Louis                 38 153  52 13  11  229 .851
 19   Tenny      Boston                    18  55  18 11   3   87 .839
 20   Wilson     New York                  32 119  22 20   9  170 .829
 21   Weaver     Louisville and Pitts.     30  88  27 11  15  141 .815
 22   Kinslow    Brooklyn                  61 114  47 19  23  203 .793
 23   Grady      Philadelphia              38 101  30 21  20  172 .761
 24   Dugdale    Washington                30  75  38 20  10  143 .720
------------------------------------------------------------------------



PITCHERS' RECORD, IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER--1894.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Heading abbreviations used in this table:
  G     Games Played
  %W    Percent games won excluding tie games
  RS    Runs scored average per game
  RE    Runs earned, average per game
  %BH   Percent of base hits off pitcher
  BoB   Bases given on balls
  SO    No. struck out
  %FC    Percent fielding chances accepted

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pitcher.      Club.             G   %W    RS    RE   %BH   BoB   SO  %FC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Breitenst'n  St. Louis         49  .551  6.32  3.06  .280  162  138  .902
Colcolough   Pittsburgh        15  .533  9.13  4.87  .354   59   19  .844
Cuppy        Cleveland         37  .583  7.13  3.24  .298  119   63  .916
Carsey       Philadelphia      31  .580  7.93  3.84  .314   95   40  .831
Clarkson     St. Louis         26  .308  8.11  4.19  .318  102   42  .794
Chamberlain  Cincinnati        19  .526  7.45  3.70  .309   78   57  .729
Dwyer        Cincinnati        39  .500  7.3   4.13  .317   97   47  .902
Daub         Brooklyn          26  .423  7.89  3.70  .306   71   33  .694
Esper        Wash. and Balti.  26  .500  8.3   4.88  .339   59   36  .929
Ehret        Pittsburgh        41  .436  7.05  4.17  .306  111   91  .808
Gumbert      Pittsburgh        31  .600  7.23  4.87  .326   73   60  .909
Griffith     Chicago           32  .656  6.46  3.59  .300   79   67  .901
German       New York          17  .471  7.82  3.53  .288   48   15  .842
Gleason      St.L. and Balti.  29  .586  6.00  3.45  .312   59   39  .841
Hemming      Louis. and Balti. 40  .500  6.02  2.85  .295  140   75  .893
Hawke        Baltimore         23  .562  7.17  4.08  .311   58   50  .887
Hutchinson   Chicago           30  .467  7.47  3.33  .314  125   60  .716
Hawley       St. Louis         47  .413  7.04  3.72  .303  121  117  .708
Inks         Balti. and Louis. 24  .478  7.96  4.04  .337   75   37  .846
Killen       Pittsburgh        24  .583  6.25  3.87  .303   83   57  .909
Knell        Louisville        30  .200  8.46  3.60  .329   97   65  .693
Kennedy      Brooklyn          42  .545  7.55  4.21  .302  134  101  .771
Menafee      Louis. and Pitts. 37  .351  6.59  3.67  .309   85   78  .904
Mercer       Washington        38  .421  7.18  4.09  .303  105   57  .852
Meekin       New York          47  .790  4.91  2.38  .253  147  127  .798
Maul         Washington        24  .458  8.08  4.08  .307   60   31  .785
Mullane      Balt. and Cleve.  17  .470  8.17  4.17  .297   80   44  .740
McMahon      Baltimore         34  .735  5.51  3.00  .269  109   55  .869
McGill       Chicago           24  .291  8.12  3.83  .321   98   55  .846
Nichols      Boston            46  .711  6.78  3.56  .291  108   98  .856
Parrott      Cincinnati        37  .459  7.24  3.94  .307  120   61  .824
Rusie        New York          49  .734  4.73  2.12  .253  189  204  .867
Stratton     Louis. & Chicago  21  .476  9.43  5.24  .366   52   29  .931
Stockdale    Washington        16  .375  7.60  3.60  .353   39    8  .825
Stivetts     Boston            39  .692  7.49  3.43  .306  100   73  .913
Stein        Brooklyn          42  .619  6.26  3.05  .280  162   72  .785
Staley       Boston            25  .520  8.88  5.72  .344   55   29  .744
Sullivan     Wash. and Cleve.  23  .348  8.26  3.74  .320   97   28  .714
Terry        Chicago           19  .278  9.73  4.00  .334   91   43  .782
Taylor       Philadelphia      33  .719  5.30  2.76  .281   85   79  .796
Weyhing      Philadelphia      33  .545  6.72  3.49  .324  101   79  .845
Wadsworth    Louisville       21  .190  9.38  4.66  .360   97   58  .703
Westervelt   New York          18  .412  7.39  3.83  .297   62   28  .654
Young        Cleveland         47  .532  5.83  3.17  .293  100  100  .902

Tie games--Cuppy, 1; Dwyer, 1; Daub, 1; Ehret, 1; Gumbert, 1; Hawley, 1;
Inks, 1; Meekin, 4; Nichols, 1; Stein, 1; Terry, 1; Taylor 1; Westervelt,1.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



The Batting of 1894.


THE TEAM-WORK AT THE BAT.

It goes to the credit of the leading teams in the pennant race of 1894
that the first three clubs did better team-work at the bat, and more of
it, than any previous trio of the kind known in the annals of the
League. In fact, competent managers and captains of teams have learned
in recent years, by costly experiment, that one of the most potent
factors in winning pennants is the method of handling the ash known as
good _team-work at the bat_ the very essence of which is devoting all
the batsmen's efforts to _forwarding runners by base hits_, and not by
each player's going to the bat simply to build up a high record of base
hits without regard to forwarding runners on bases. Suppose the first
baseman in a game to take his position at the bat makes a two or
three-bagger at the outset. Of course the object of the batsman who
succeeds him would be to send the runner home the best way he can,
either by a base hit or a sacrifice hit. In striving to do this, the
very worst plan, is to try solely for a home run hit, as it only
succeeds once in thirty or forty times, and not that against skilful,
strategic pitching. Time and again were batsmen, last season, left on
third base after opening the innings with a three-bagger, owing to the
stupid work of the succeeding batsmen in trying to "line 'em out for a
homer," instead of doing real team-work at the bat. Of course, good
"sacrifice hitting" is part and parcel of team-work at the bat, but
this kind of hitting was not done to any special extent last season by a
majority of the League batsmen.



SACRIFICE HITTING.

There is one thing about the point of play in batting known, as
"sacrifice hitting" which is not as thoroughly understood as it should
be. A majority of batsmen seem to be of the impression that when they
are called upon to forward a base runner by a "sacrifice hit," all they
have to do is to go to the bat and have themselves put out, so that the
base runner at first base may be able to reach second base on the play
which puts the batsmen out. This is a very erroneous idea of the true
intent of a sacrifice hit. No skilful batsmen ever goes to the bat
purposely to hit the ball so as to have himself put out; that would be a
very silly move. On the contrary, he takes his bat in hand every time,
with the primary object of _making a base hit_ if he possibly can; but
in trying for this strongest point in batting, he proposes, to make the
desired hit in such a way that if he fails to make the base hit he will
at least hit the ball in that direction in the field which will oblige
the fielders to throw him out at first base. With this object in view he
will always strive for a safe hit to _right field_, especially by means
of a hard "bounder" in that direction, so as to force the second baseman
to run to right short to field the ball, in which case the runner at
first base will be able to steal to second on the hit in nine cases out
of ten. Another good effort for a sacrifice hit is to _bunt_ the ball so
that it may roll towards third base, out of reach of the baseman or
pitcher. A third sacrifice hit is that of a long high ball to the
outfield, which admits of a chance for a catch, but so far out in the
field that the runner will have an opportunity to steal a base on the
catch. This latter point won't work, of course, when two men are out;
moreover, it should be the last point aimed at.

A great deal of bosh has been written--mostly by the admirers of "fungo"
hitting--about sacrifice hitting being something that should not be in
the game, just as these fungo-hitting-advocates try to write down _bunt_
hitting--the most difficult place hit known to the game. This class of
writers think that the very acme of batting skill is the home run hit, a
hit which any muscular novice in batting on amateur fields can
accomplish without difficulty, and where more home runs are made in a
single season than in two seasons by the best managed professional
teams. The effort to make home runs leads to more chances for catches by
outfielders in one game than there are home runs made in fifty. The
exhaustion which follows a home run hit, with its sprinting run of 120
yards at full speed, is entirely lost sight of by the class of patrons
of the game who favor home runs. One season, a few years ago, the
tail-end team of the League excelled all its rivals in scoring home
runs, while the pennant-winning team took the honors and the prize
solely on account of its excellence in team-work at the bat. The mere
record of the best averages in scoring base hits in batting seems to be
regarded by the majority of "cranks" in base ball as the only sound
criterion of good batting. This is one of the fallacies of the game, as
such a record is unreliable. The only true criterion of good batting is
the record which shows the players who excel in the batting which
forwards runners; and this record the existing scoring rules, up to
1895, did not admit of, the champion batsman being regarded as the one
who excels in his base-hit average, without regard to the runners his
base hits forwarded. For instance, one batsman in a game will make three
three-baggers, and forward but a single runner by his three hits, while
another batsman by a single base hit, a good "bunt" hit and a telling
"sacrifice hit," will forward _four runners_; and yet by the existing
scoring rules the record batsman carries off all the honors in the
score, and the team-worker at the bat does not get the slightest credit
for the effective batting he has done.


SACRIFICE HIT RECORD.

The following is the record of the players in the League teams of 1894
who led in sacrifice hits last season. The names are given in the order
of bases stolen, as recorded in the official average tables made up by
Mr. Young. The percentage figures would, of course, materially change
the order.

-----------------------------------------------
                                   Sacrifice
PLAYERS.     CLUBS.        Games.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------
Donovan      Pittsburgh      129          24
Brodie       Baltimore       129          24
Beckley      Pittsburgh      132          22
Bierbauer    Pittsburgh      131          20
Ward         New York        136          20
Kelley       Baltimore       129          19
Buckley      Philadelphia     67          18
Boyle        Philadelphia    116          18
Brouthers    Baltimore       123          18
Jennings     Baltimore       128          18
Shindle      Brooklyn        117          17
Cross        Philadelphia    120          16
Keeler       Baltimore       128          16
Pfeffer      Louisville      104          15
Mack         Pittsburgh       63          14
McGraw       Baltimore       123          14
Brown        Louisville      130          14
Wilmot       Chicago         135          14
Shugart      St. Louis        33          13
Glasscock    Pittsburgh       86          13
Quinn        St. Louis       106          13
Ely          St. Louis       127          13
Abbey        Washington      129          13
Van Haltren  New York        139          13
Frank        St. Louis        80          12
Weaver       Pittsburgh       90          12
Tredway      Brooklyn        122          12
Lyons        Pittsburgh       72          11
G. Tebeau    Cleveland       105          11
Robinson     Baltimore       106          11
Hay          Cincinnati      128          11
Latham       Cincinnati      130          11
McKean       Cleveland       130          11
Menafee      Pittsburgh       37          10
Ehret        Pittsburgh       41          10
Blake        Cleveland        73          10
Hassamer     Washington      116          10
Dahlen       Chicago         121          10
Duffy        Boston          124          10
Burkett      Cleveland       124          10
E. Smith     Pittsburgh      125          10
Corcoran     Brooklyn        129          10
Burke        New York        138          10
----------------------------------------------

According to the above table Pittsburgh led with a total of 146
sacrifice hits, Baltimore being next with 120, followed by Philadelphia
with 52, New York 43, Cleveland 42, Brooklyn 39, St. Louis 38,
Louisville 29, Chicago 24, Washington 23, Cincinnati 22 and Boston 10.

A record connected with the batting of each season is that showing the
number of victories and defeats, marked by single and double figure
scores. This data shows, to a considerable extent, how the pitching
stands in relation to the batting, as to whether the one or the other
dominates too much in the efforts of the rulemakers to equal the powers
of attack and defence. If the pitching has the best of it than we have
a predominance of the undesirable class of pitchers' games, in which the
minority of the fielders only bear the brunt of the contest. On the
other hand, if the batting rules the roost, then we have too much of the
old slugging style of play, in which the outfielders are mostly brought
into play, and but little chance to see skilful base running or splendid
infielding is afforded. Here are some records which show what was done
in 1894 in this respect:

The three leading teams in the pennant race of 1894 scored a total of
198 single figure games to 194 double figure games. The record in
detail being as follows:

SINGLE FIGURE.
-------------------------------------------
Baltimore single figure victories      40
Baltimore single figure defeats        18
New York single figure victories       59
New York single figure defeats         25
Boston single figure victories         34
Boston single figure defeats           22
                                      ---
Totals                                198
-------------------------------------------

DOUBLE FIGURE.
-------------------------------------------
Baltimore double figure victories      49
Baltimore double figure defeats        21
New York double figure victories       29
New York double figure defeats         19
Boston double figure victories         49
Boston double figure defeats           27
                                      ---
Totals                                194
-------------------------------------------

This record includes games counted out or forfeited.

The full record of the twelve clubs in single and double figure
victories and defeats in 1894 is appended.


RECORD  OF  SINGLE  AND  DOUBLE FIGURE  GAMES.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                 SINGLE FIGURE.               DOUBLE FIGURE.
CLUBS.     Victories. Defeats. Totals.  Victories. Defeats. Totals.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore         40       18      58          49       21      70
New York          59       25      84          29       19      48
Boston            34       22      56          49       27      76
Philadelphia      28       22      50          43       30      73
Brooklyn          34       27      61          36       35      71
Cleveland         39       36      75          29       25      54
Pittsburgh        35       35      70          30       20      50
Chicago           20       40      60          38       35      73
St. Louis         35       45      80          21       31      52
Cincinnati        36       37      73          20       38      58
Washington        28       34      62          17       53      70
Louisville        24       61      85          12       34      46
Totals           412      402     814         373      368     741
---------------------------------------------------------------------

It will be seen that the Boston club, which was third in the race, is
first in scoring the most total double figures in their contests, the
"Phillies" being second and the Chicagos third. In total single figure
scores New York takes a decided lead, while the Louisville club is
second and St. Louis third. In single figure victories, however, New
York is first, Baltimore second and Cleveland third; while in double
figure victories Baltimore and Boston are tied and Philadelphia is
third. The totals of 814 single figure games against 741 double figure
contests shows that the pitching is not yet overpowered by the batting,
though the use of the big mitts in infield work had much to do with the
scoring of single figure games. As far as these records show, it would
appear that the New York team really did the best batting of the
season.



The Batting Averages.


We give below a record, taken from the official averages of the League,
giving the batting figure, which shows the base hit percentage and the
total sacrifice hits of those who have played in a majority of the
scheduled games of the season of 1894, the limit being not less than 70
games. The names of the clubs are given in pennant-race order, beginning
with Baltimore and ending with Louisville. The record is not of much
account, except in the showing of the comparative base hit and sacrifice
hit batting, the larger total of the latter giving the palm in case of a
tie in the base hit averages. It also shows, as far as sacrifice hit
figures can show, which batsman did the best team-work batting. But the
one thing wanting in the record of batting averages is the data showing
the runners forwarded by base hits, and until the scoring rules give
such data there can be no correct data useful as a criterion of skilful
batting. Another record needed in the score summary of each game is that
of the number of chances given for catches off the bat, thus showing the
carelessness of the batting in the averaged number of chances for
catches offered off the bat.

Here, is the record above referred to:

An Analysis of the Batting Averages.
--------------------------------------

BALTIMORE CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Kelly               129           .391          19
Brodie              129           .369          24
Keeler              128           .367          16
Robinson            106           .348          11
Brouthers           123           .344          18
McGraw              123           .340          14
Jennings            128           .332          18
Reitz               109           .306           7
-----------------------------------------------------

NEW YORK CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Doyle               105           .369           4
Davis               124           .345           9
Van Haltren         139           .333          13
Burke               138           .299          10
Fuller               95           .282           0
Tiernan             112           .282           6
Farrell             112           .282           3
Murphy               73           .271           2
Ward                136           .262          20
-----------------------------------------------------

BOSTON CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Duffy               124           .438          10
McCarthy            126           .349           9
Lowe                133           .341           9
Bannon              127           .336           6
Tucker              122           .328           2
Long                103           .324           8
Nash                132           .294           3
-----------------------------------------------------

PHILADELPHIA CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Turner               77           .423           8
Thompson            102           .403           8
Delahanty           114           .400           5
Hamilton            131           .398           7
Cross               128           .388          16
Hallman             119           .327          22
Boyle               116           .291          18
-----------------------------------------------------

BROOKLYN CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Griffin             106           .365           5
Burns               126           .358           9
Daly                123           .338           4
Treadway            122           .336          12
Foutz                73           .310           8
Corcoran            129           .302          10
Shindle             117           .300          17
-----------------------------------------------------

CLEVELAND CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Childs              117           .365           4
Burkett             124           .357          10
McKean              130           .354          11
O'Connor             80           .330           4
O. Tebeau           119           .305           9
Blake                73           .286          10
Zimmer               88           .285           2
McGarr              127           .272           5
G. Tebeau           105           .266          11
-----------------------------------------------------

PITTSBURGH CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
E. Smith            125           .352          10
Stenzel             131           .351           5
Beckley             132           .344          22
Lyons                72           .311          11
Donovan             133           .306          26
Bierbauer           131           .301          20
Shugart             133           .285          13
Glasscock            86           .283          13
Shiebeck             75           .275           1
Weaver               90           .250          12
-----------------------------------------------------

CHICAGO CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Anson                83           .394           7
Dahlen              121           .362          10
Ryan                108           .359           8
Wilmot              105           .331          14
Lange               112           .324           4
Decker               89           .310           2
Irwin               130           .302           4
Schriver             94           .269           5
Parrott             126           .244           9
-----------------------------------------------------

ST. LOUIS CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Miller              125           .341           8
Ely                 127           .305          13
Peitz               100           .274           7
Quinn               106           .274          13
Dowd                123           .267           9
Frank                80           .246          12
-----------------------------------------------------

CINCINNATI CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Holliday            122           .383           4
McPhee              128           .320           6
Latham              130           .313          11
Hoy                 128           .312          11
Canavan             100           .293           5
Murphy               76           .268           6
G. Smith            128           .266           3
-----------------------------------------------------

WASHINGTON CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Joyce                98           .344           5
Hassamer            116           .326          10
Abbey               129           .318          13
Selbach              96           .309           3
McGuire             102           .304           4
F. Ward              89           .303           5
Cartwright          132           .292           3
Radford              93           .233           1
-----------------------------------------------------

LOUISVILLE CLUB.
-----------------------------------------------------
                           Percent. of   Sacrifice
BATSMEN.          Games.     Base Hits.       Hits.
-----------------------------------------------------
Pfeffer             104           .297          15
Grimm               107           .290           8
Clark                76           .275           1
Richardson          116           .255           4
Brown               130           .251          14
Lutenburg            70           .192           3
-----------------------------------------------------


The record of the twelve clubs in the League pennant race of 1894 in the
total number of sacrifice hits is as follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Sacrifice
BATSMEN.      CLUBS.            Games.        Hits.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Donovan       Pittsburgh        133           26
Brodie        Baltimore         129           24
Cross         Philadelphia      128           16
Pfeffer       Louisville        104           15
Wilmot        Chicago           135           14
Quinn         St. Louis         106           13
Abbey         Washington        129           13
Van Haltren   New York          139           13
Tredway       Brooklyn          122           12
Hoy           Cincinnati        128           11
G. Tebeau     Cleveland         105           11
Duffy         Boston            124           10
---------------------------------------------------------------------

The first nine in base hit averages were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------
                               Percent, of  Sacrifice
    BATSMEN.      CLUBS.       Games.  Base Hits.  Hits.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Duffy         Boston        124    .438        10
Turner        Philadelphia   77    .423         8
Thompson      Philadelphia  102    .403         8
Delahanty     Philadelphia  114    .400         5
Hamilton      Philadelphia  131    .398         7
Anson         Chicago        88    .394         7
Kelly         Baltimore     129    .391        19
Cross         Philadelphia  128    .388         6
Holliday      Cincinnati    122    .383         4
---------------------------------------------------------------------



BASE RUNNING.

It should be borne in mind by the rulemakers of the League, and
especially by the magnates who pass upon the work done by the Rules
Committee, that base running has come to be as much of an art in the
game as is skilful, strategic pitching or team-work in batting.
Especially has skill in stealing bases become a potent factor
in winning games, and year after year is it increasing in popular favor
as one of the most attractive features of the game. Every manager of the
period should realize the important fact, that, however strong his team
may be in its "battery" department, or in the excellence of the field
support given the pitchers, it is lacking in one essential element of
strength if it be not up to the mark in base stealing by its
players. Effective pitching and sharp fielding are, of course, very
necessary to success in winning games, as also skilful batting,
especially of the strategic kind. While it is a difficult task to get to
first base safely in the face of a steady and effective fire from the
opposing "battery," backed up by good support from the field, it is
still more difficult when the first base is safely reached to secure the
other bases by good base stealing. The fact is, a greater degree of
intelligence is required in the player who would excel in base running
than is needed either in fielding or in batting. Any soft-brained
heavy-weight can occasionally hit a ball for a home run, but it requires
a shrewd, intelligent player, with his wits about him, to make a
successful base runner. Indeed, base running is the most difficult work
a player has to do in the game. To cover infield positions properly, a
degree of intelligence in the player is required, which the majority do
not as a general rule possess; but to excel in base running such mental
qualifications are required as only a small minority are found to
possess. Presence of mind, prompt action on the spur of the moment;
quickness of perception, and coolness and nerve are among the requisites
of a successful base runner. Players habitually accustomed to hesitate
to do this, that or the other, in attending to the varied points of a
game, can never become good base runners. There is so little time
allowed to judge of the situation that prompt action becomes a necessity
with the base runner. He must "hurry up" all the time. Then, too, he
must be daring in taking risks, while at the same time avoiding
recklessness in his running.

Due consideration had not been given by the League magnates, up to 1895,
to the importance of having more definite rules governing the base
running in the game, the rules applicable to balks in pitching, as
affecting the base running, having been at no time as clear and definite
as they should be; nor have the existing rules bearing upon base running
been strictly observed by the majority of the umpires each year;
especially was this the case in 1892, when the observance of the balk
rule was very lax indeed. The difficulty in framing a proper rule for
the purpose is, to properly define the difference between a palpable
_fielding_ error, which enables a base to be run on the error, and an
error plainly induced by the very effort made to steal a base. No base
can be credited to a base runner as having been stolen which is the
result of a dropped fly ball, a wild throw to a base player, or a
palpable muff in fielding a batted ball. But in view of the difficulties
surrounding base stealing, it is not going out of the way to credit a
base as stolen when the effort of the runner, in taking ground and
getting a start to steal, leads to a passed ball, a failure to throw to
a base quick enough, or a failure on the part of a base player to put
the ball on the runner quick enough. Of course these are, to a certain
extent, errors on the part of the fielders, but they are not of the
class of _palpable errors_ as wild throws, dropped fly balls, and
failures to pick up batted balls, or to hold well thrown balls, are. The
other errors are consequent upon the effort on the part of the runner to
steal a base, and as such should be included as part and parcel of a
credited stolen base.

#The Base Running of 1894.#

The base running records of the past three years, under the rules of the
great major league, present a very interesting set of tables, whereby
one can judge of the good work done in this direction pretty
fairly. Below we give the full record of each season in stolen bases
from 1892 to 1894, inclusive, showing the totals of stolen bases by each
club each season, together with the aggregate of stolen bases for the
three years. We give the names of the twelve clubs in the order in which
they lead in stolen bases at the end of the three years of base running.
Here is the full record in question:

RECORD OF TOTAL STOLEN BASES FOR 1892, 1893 AND 1894.
---------------------------------------------------
    CLUBS.          1892.  1893.  1894.  TOTALS.
---------------------------------------------------
1.  New York         281    401    294    976
2.  Brooklyn         408    247    266    921
3.  Baltimore        197    261    320    778
4.  Chicago          216    237    324    777
5.  Cleveland        288    242    228    758
6.  Boston           337    174    230    741
7.  Pittsburgh       211    245    247    703
8.  Philadelphia     217    174    266    657
9.  Cincinnati       241    204    205    650
10. Washington       250    142    209    601
11. Louisville       228    174    198    600
12. St. Louis        196    196    150    542
---------------------------------------------------
Totals              3070   2697   2937   8704
---------------------------------------------------

It will be seen by the above record that the best base running, in the
aggregate of the three years' play, was made in 1892, the three leading
clubs in stolen bases that year being Brooklyn, Boston and Cleveland. In
1893 the three leaders in base running were New York, Baltimore and
Brooklyn, and the three leaders of the past season were Chicago,
Baltimore and Brooklyn, Philadelphia being tied with Brooklyn. The
tail-end clubs in stolen base records during the three years were
St. Louis in 1892, Washington in 1893 and St. Louis in 1894. In the
aggregate of the three years, New York stands first, Brooklyn second and
Baltimore third, St. Louis being a bad tail-ender in these total
figures. It is a noteworthy fact that when Brooklyn led in base running
Ward was captain, while when New York led the next year, Ward was
captain, too, New York jumping from .281 in 1892, when Ward was in
Brooklyn, to .401 in 1893, when he went to the New York club, Brooklyn
that year falling off from .408 to .247. Baltimore, too, made a big jump
in base running after Hanlon became manager, the jump being from .197 in
1892 to .320 in 1894.

The highest totals of stolen bases in any one year was in 1892, there
being quite a falling off in 1893; while in 1894 a considerable
improvement was shown, the average for the three years being 2,901 for
the twelve clubs.

Last season the Baltimore club's team, under Hanlon's control, excelled
all the other Eastern teams in stealing bases, Philadelphia being
second, New York third and Boston fourth in this respect, the
Baltimore's quartette of leading base stealers scoring a total of 212
bases to Philadelphia's 185, New York's 180 and Boston's 156. The three
teams of the Western clubs which excelled in base running last season
were Chicago, with a total of 324; Pittsburgh, with 247, and Cleveland,
with 228.

Had the umpires properly interpreted the balk rules in 1894, probably
the total of stolen bases for that year would have got up among the
twelve hundreds at least. This year they should be made to do it.


THE STOLEN BASE RECORD OF 1894.

The record of stolen bases for 1894, showing the best nine base stealers
of each club is as appended. The names of clubs are given in pennant
race order, and of players in the order of percentage of stolen bases
per game.


THE RECORD OF THE FIRST DIVISION CLUBS.
----------------------------------------

BALTIMORE
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
McGraw       123    77   .636
Bonner        27    11   .407
Brodie       129    50   .388
Kelley       129    45   .350
Brouthers    126    40   .317
Jennings     128    36   .281
Keeler       128    30   .235
Reitz        109    18   .165
Robinson     106     9   .123

Totals      1005   820   .318
----------------------------------------

NEW YORK
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Doyle        105    48   .457
Fuller        95    34   .358
Burke        138    47   .340
Van Halt'n   139    44   .315
Ward         136    41   .306
Davis        124    37   .298
Tiernan      112    24   .214
German        19     4   .211
Wilson        45     9   .200

Totals      1006   294   .292
----------------------------------------

BOSTON
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Duffy        124    49   .395
Bannon       127    42   .331
McCarthy     126    40   .317
Tierney       24     7   .292
Long         103    25   .243
Lowe         133    25   .188
Tucker       122    19   .156
Nash         132    19   .144
Stivetts .    57     4   .070

Totals       948   230   .253
----------------------------------------

PHILADELPHIA.
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Hamilton     131    99   .756
Thompson     102    29   .284
Delahanty    104    29   .279
Cross        120    28   .233
Hallman      119    26   .218
Boyle        116    22   .190
Reilly        36     6   .167
Sullivan      93    15   .161
Turner        77    12   .157

Totals       898   266   .296
----------------------------------------

BROOKLYN.
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Griffin      106    48   .453
Daly         123    53   .431
LaChance      65    25   .385
Shock         63    18   .286
Corcoran     129    33   .256
Burns        126    29   .230
Foutz         73    16   .219
Treadway     122    26   .213
Shindle      117    18   .154

Totals       924   266   .288
----------------------------------------

CLEVELAND.
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Ewing         53    19   .385
G. Tebeau    105    34   .324
McGarr       127    34   .269
McAleer       64    17   .266
Burkett      124    32   .258
McKean       130    32   .246
Childs       117    20   .171
O'Connor      80    13   .163
O. Tebeau    109    27   .155

Totals       909   228   .251
----------------------------------------

It will be seen that the Baltimore club's nine excel the other five
clubs in the percentage of stolen bases, Philadelphia being second and
New York third; the other three following in order in percentage figures
as follows: Brooklyn, Boston and Cleveland. In total stolen bases by the
individual player, Hamilton leads with 99--the champion stolen-base
record of the season--McGraw being second and Duffy third, followed by
Griffin, Doyle and Ewing.


THE SECOND DIVISION LEADERS.
----------------------------

PITTSBURGH.
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Stenzel      131    60   .450
Hartman       44    17   .386
E. Smith     125    37   .296
Shiebeck      75    19   .244
Donovan      131    31   .236
Glasscock     86    20   .233
Shugart      133    23   .172
Bierbaur     131    20   .153
Beckley      132    20   .152

Totals       987   247   .250
----------------------------------------

CHICAGO.
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Lange        112    71   .634
Wilmot       135    76   .563
Dableu       121    49   .415
Parrott      126    34   .370
Irwin        130    34   .262
Decker        89    22   .247
Anson         83    17   .205
Ryan         108    12   .111
Schriver      94     9   .096

Totals       998   324   .325
----------------------------------------

ST. LOUIS.
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Dowd         123    34   .276
Hogan         29     7   .248
Ely          127    23   .181
Pietz        100    17   .170
Miller       125    20   .160
Cooley        52     8   .154
Quinn        106    26   .151
Frank         80    12   .150
Breitenstein  53     3   .057

Totals       795   150   .189
----------------------------------------

CINCINNATI
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Latham       130    62   .477
Holliday     122    39   .320
McPhee       128    31   .242
Hay          128    30   .235
M. Murphy     76     5   .192
Canavan      160    15   .150
Vaughn        67     6   .097
G. Smith     128    12   .094
Merritt       66     5   .079

Totals       945   205   .217
----------------------------------------

WASHINGTON
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Ward          89    36   .401
Cartwright   132    35   .269
Radford      106    26   .245
Seebach       96    23   .240
Joyce         98    23   .235
Mercer        43    10   .233
Abbey        129    30   .233
Hassamer     116    15   .129
McGuire      102    11   .108

Totals       911   209   .229
----------------------------------------

LOUISVILLE
----------------------------------------
Players.   Games. Stolen  Per cent. of
                  Bases.  Stolen Bases.
----------------------------------------
Brown        130    74   .569
Smith         39    13   .333
Pfeffer      104    33   .317
Clark         76    24   .316
Twitchell     51     9   .176
Denny         60    10   .167
Lutenberg     70    10   .143
Grim         107    14   .131
Richardson   116    11   .095

Totals       753   198   .263
----------------------------------------

It will be seen that the leaders of the six second division clubs
aggregated a total of 337 bases, of which Brown is credited with 74,
Lange with 71, and Latham with 62. In percentages, however, Lange led
with .634, Brown being second with .569, and Latham third with .477,
Stenzel, Ward (of Washington) and Dowd following in order. In total
percentages, the Chicago nine led "by a large majority," Louisville
being second and Pittsburgh third, Washington beating both Cincinnati
and St. Louis, the latter club making a very poor show in base running
figures in 1894.

THE LEADING BASE STEALERS OF EACH CLUB.

The following record shows the leader of each club in percentage of
stolen bases, the names being given in the order of percentage figures:

---------------------------------------------------
                                  Total  Per cent.
                                 Stolen  of Stolen
Players.   Clubs.        Games.  Bases.   Bases.
---------------------------------------------------
Hamilton   Philadelphia   131     99       .756
McGraw     Baltimore      123     77       .636
Lange      Chicago        112     71       .626
Brown      Louisville     130     74       .569
Latham     Cincinnati     130     62       .477
Doyle      New York       105     48       .457
Griffin    Brooklyn       106     48       .453
Stenzel    Pittsburgh     131     60       .450
Duffy      Boston         124     49       .395
Ewing      Cleveland       53     19       .385
F. Ward    Washington      89     36       .306
Dowd       St. Louis      123     34       .276
---------------------------------------------------

The record of the base runners of the twelve League clubs who have a
record of 10 stolen bases and less than 20 each for 1894 is as follows:

---------------------------------------------------
PLAYERS.        CLUBS.       Games.  Stolen Bases.
---------------------------------------------------
 1. Ewing       Cleveland      53       19
 2. Shiebeck    Pittsburgh     75       19
 3. Tucker      Boston        122       19
 4. Nash        Boston        132       19
 5. Shock       Brooklyn       63       18
 6. Reitz       Baltimore     109       18
 7. Shindle     Brooklyn      117       18
 8. McAleer     Cleveland      64       17
 9. Lyons       Pittsburgh     72       17
10. Anson       Chicago        83       17
11. Pietz       St. Louis     100       17
12. Foutz       Brooklyn       73       16
13. Zimmer      Cleveland      88       15
14. Sullivan    Philadelphia.  93       15
15. Canavan     Cincinnati    100       15
16. Hassamer    Washington    116       15
17. Grimm       Louisville    107       14
18. Smith       Louisville     39       13
19. O'Connor    Cleveland      80       13
20. Robinson    Baltimore     106       13
21. Hartman     Pittsburgh     49       12
22. Frank       St. Louis      80       12
23. Turner      Philadelphia.  77       12
24. Ryan        Chicago       108       12
25. G. Smith    Cincinnati    128       12
26. Bonner      Baltimore      27       11
27. McGuire     Washington    102       11
28. Richardson  Louisville    116       11
29. Mercer      Washington     43       10
30. Denny       Louisville     70       10
31. Lutenberg   Louisville     70       10
32. O'Rourke    St. Louis      80       10
33. Farrell     New York      112       10
---------------------------------------------------

Those who did not steal a single base were pitchers Esper,
Dwyer, J. Clarkson, Ehret, Staley, Whitrock, McGill,
Wadsworth and catcher Buckley.



THE FIELDING OF 1894.

Season after season finds the fielding in base ball better attended to
than any other department of the game; and it is fortunate for the
business end of professional ball playing that it is so, as skilful
fielding is decidedly the most attractive feature of our national
game. Next to fielding comes base running, and lastly batting. The
reason that so much more skill is shown in the fielding department than
in that of batting, is due to the fact that more attention is giving to
fielding than to batting. Regular training in team-work batting is
practically unknown in the professional arena; while practice in
fielding is given every attention. No game is played now-a-days without
an hour being devoted to preliminary practice in fielding, while
efficient batting is unknown except in the college arena, the
professionals ignoring team-work batting practice in nearly every
club. Hence the superiority fielding has attained over the batting. Go
on any amateur field and watch a game in progress, and you can readily
see the inferiority in fielding exhibited in comparison with that shown
on the professional fields. It is not so in the batting, however. The
reason is that amateurs have not the time to devote to the practice
required to excel in fielding; but they can bat out three-baggers and
home-runs as easily as the record batsmen do in the professional fields;
it is different, however, in the case of doing team-work at the bat,
owing to their not having time for the necessary practice.

Some splendid fielding was done in 1894, but as a whole it was not
superior to that of 1893, or even to that of 1892. One reason for this
was the introduction of the catcher's "big mitt" in the infield
work--something that should not have been allowed. It was due to this
fact that the batting scores were not larger the past season than they
were in 1893, the big mitt on the hands of infielders enabling them to
stop hard hit "bounders" and "daisy cutters" which, but for the use of
the mitts, would have been clean earned base hits. This gave the
infielders an opportunity to materially lessen the base hit record. By a
mistaken calculation, the pitchers were charged with doing less
effective work, single figure games being in a majority last season.

In contrast to the attractions of fine fielding, the average batting of
the period is decidedly behindhand. What sight on a ball field is
prettier to the good judge of the fine points of the game, than to see a
hard hit "bounder" well stopped and accurately thrown from back of third
base over to first base in time to cut off a rapid runner? or to see a
splendidly judged fly ball held after a long run; or a hot "liner"
caught on the jump by an infielder; or a beautiful triple play made from
the infield; or a good double play from a neat catch, followed by a
fine, long throw-in from the outfield? All these attractive features of
sharp fielding all can enjoy and appreciate. But in the batting
department too little team-work at the bat--that is, skilful scientific
handling of the bat in the form of _place_ hitting, to forward
runners--is done to gratify good judges, the mere novices regarding
over-the-fence hits for a home run as the very acme of "splendid
batting," though they are invariably chance hits, and only made off poor
pitching as a rule. Then, too, how the "groundlings," as Hamlet called
them, enjoy "fungo" hitting, that is high balls hit in the air flying to
the outfield, this style of hitting giving fifty chances for catches to
every single home run. Time and again will one hear a "bleacher" remark,
"I don't care if the ball was caught, it was a good hit," as if any hit
could be a good one which gave an easy chance for a catch. When a
"fungo" hitter takes his bat in hand all he thinks of is to "line 'em
out, Tommy," in response to the calls from the "bleaching boards;" and
when the ball goes up in the air to outfield a shout bursts forth from
the crowd, only to be suddenly stopped as the ball is easily caught at
deep outfield by an outfielder placed there purposely for the catch by
the pitcher's skilful pitching for catches. Contrast this method of
batting to that of place hitting which yields a safe tap to short
outfield, ensuring an earned base; or the skilful "bunt" hit made at a
time when the fielders are expecting a "line-'em-out" hit; or a
sacrifice hit, following a good effort for a base hit to right field,
which should mark all attempts to forward runners, especially when on
third base. Of course there are skilful outfield hits made in team-work,
but they are confined to hot, low liners, giving no chance for a catch,
or hard hit "daisy cutters," which yield two or three bases; but every
ball hit in the air to outfield shows weak batting, and this style of
hitting it is which gives so many chances for catches in a game. It
will be readily seen how inferior the "bleaching-board" style of batting
is to team-work at the bat, and how much more attractive fielding is in
contrast to the popular "fungo" hitting method, of which there was
altogether too much in the League ranks last season to make the batting
compare with the fielding, as an attractive feature of the game.



Single Figure Games.

There is a great difference between first-class single figure games,
marked by batting against skilful, strategic pitching, backed up by
splendid in and outfield support, and the class of contests known as
"pitchers' games." The former are contests in which runners reaching
second and even third base by good hits are cut off from scoring runs by
superior pitching and fielding, and this class of games comprises the
model contests of each season. On the other hand, the "pitchers' games,"
which yield single figure scores, are tedious and wearisome to the best
judges of the game, from the fact that the brunt of the work falls on
the "battery" team and one or two infielders, all the attractions of
base running and of sharp fielding being sacrificed at the cost of
seeing batsman after batsman retired on called strikes, arising from the
intimidating speed of the pitching, this requiring the batsman to devote
his whole energies to defending himself from the severe and often fatal
injuries following his being hit by the pitched ball. Fortunately, the
change in the distance between the pitcher and batsman has decreased the
opportunity for this class of unattractive games. But it will not do to
go over to the other side and by too much weakening of the box work give
the "line-'em-out" class of "fungo" hitters a chance to revel in
over-the-fence hits, and give the batsman undue preponderance in the
effort to equalize the powers of the attack and defense in the
game. Single figure games should outnumber double figure contests to
make the game attractive for the scientific play exhibited, but not in
the line of being the result of "cyclone" pitching.


The Umpiring of 1894.

The umpiring of 1894, despite of the new rules adopted early in the year
governing the position, was no improvement over that of 1893; in fact,
in several instances it was worse. The explicitly worded rule,
prohibiting umpires from allowing any player, except the captain, to
dispute a single decision of the umpire, was allowed to be openly
violated by nearly every umpire on the staff. Then, too, as a rule,
they, the majority, lacked the nerve and the courage of their
convictions too much to keep in check the blackguardism displayed by a
small minority of the players of the League teams of 1894; some of the
umpires also displayed a degree of temper at times which sadly marred
their judgment. That they all endeavored to do their duty impartially,
goes without saying, but no umpire is fit for his position who cannot
_thoroughly control his temper_. There was one instance shown of the
folly of condoning the offence of drinking, which should not have been
allowed; a drunken umpire is worse than a drunken player, for no one
will respect his decisions. None such should be allowed on the League
staff under any circumstances; moreover, no umpire connected with the
low-lived prize-fighting business should be allowed on the League staff,
no matter what his ability may be in other respects. When it becomes a
necessity to have to engage pugilists as umpires to control hoodlum
players, then will professional ball playing cease to be worthy of
public patronage.

One great drawback to the successful umpiring which was expected to
follow the revision of the rules made in March, 1894, was the
countenancing of the abuse of umpires by the magnates of the clubs
themselves. When presidents and directors of clubs fail to rebuke the
faults of their club managers in allowing incompetent or hot-headed
captains to set their players bad examples in this respect, they have no
right to find fault with the poor umpiring which follows.

In the recent past, the rule on the League ball fields--and minor
leagues copy all that the major league does--has been that, from the
time the umpire takes up his position behind the bat, from the beginning
to the end of a game, he finds both the contesting teams regarding him
as a common enemy, the losing side invariably blaming him as the primary
cause of their losing the game.

Then, too, in addition to the contesting teams as his foes, there are
the majority of the crowd of spectators to be added to the list, the
rougher element of the assemblage, the latter of whom regard the umpire
as an especial target for abuse in every instance in which the home team
is defeated. Last on the list of the umpire's opponents are the betting
class of reporters, who take delight in pitching into him whenever his
decisions--no matter how impartially he acts--go against their pet club
or the one they bet on.

It is a fact not to be disputed, that those of the crowd of spectators
at a ball game, who are so ready to condemn umpires for alleged
partiality in their work, or for a supposed lack of judgment in
rendering their decisions, never give a moment's thought to the
difficulties of the position he occupies, or to the arduous nature of
the work he is called upon to perform. There he stands, close behind the
catcher and batsman, where he is required to judge whether the
swiftly-thrown ball from the pitcher, with its erratic "curves" and
"shoots," darts in over the home base, or within the legal range of the
bat. The startling fact is never considered that several umpires have
been killed outright while occupying this dangerous position. Neither
does any one reflect for a moment that the umpire occupies this perilous
position while regarded as a common enemy by both of the contesting
teams, and as a legitimate object for insulting abuse from the partisan
portion of the crowd of spectators. In fact, the umpire stands there as
the one defenseless man against thousands of pitiless foes. The wonder
is that half the umpires in the arena are as successful in the discharge
of their arduous duties as they are, and the still greater wonder is
that any self-respecting man can be induced to occupy a position which
is becoming year after year more objectionable. There can be no
successful umpiring accomplished in the position, no matter how perfect
the code of rules governing the umpiring may apparently be, as long as
that nuisance of the ball field, the professional "kicker," is allowed
to have his way. In view of the express rules which are in the code,
prohibiting the disputing of a single decision made by the umpire, it is
astonishing that the umpires themselves, not to mention club managers
and field captains, are so derelict in their duty in not enforcing the
letter of the law of the code in this respect.

Let the magnates remember, when they say to each other this year--as
they did at the close of the season of 1894--that "this hoodlumism in
professional ball playing must be stopped," that _it is themselves who
are to blame_ for the blackguardism exhibited in the League arena in
1894. It is the failure of presidents and directors of League clubs to
do their duty which is the real cause of such umpiring as we had in
1894. Club managers of teams, as a rule, do what they know the club
presidents or directors quietly approve of or countenance, hence the
latitude given to the hoodlum tactics of the rough element in each team.
Don't blame umpires from meekly following the example club presidents
and directors afford their team managers and captains.




Editorial Comments


ON THE OCCURRENCES, EVENTS AND NOTEWORTHY INCIDENTS OF 1894 IN THE BASE
BALL ARENA.

Here is a list of the rules governing the movements of the pitcher, in
delivering the ball to the bat, which we saw violated repeatedly during
1894, without any protests from any of the umpires who acted in the
games we reported. First--

Not a pitcher had his foot in contact with the rubber plate last season,
all of them invariably placing their back foot a few inches in front of
the plate. Not one pitcher in ten, after feigning to throw to a base,
resumed his position, as required by the rule, after making the
feint. Not one in ten held the ball "firmly in front of his body," as
the rule requires. Not one in ten faced the batsman, as required by Rule
30. As for the balk rule it was as openly violated last season almost as
it was in 1893. Time and again was Section 29, Rule 32, violated as was
Section 3 all the time, as not one had his foot in position as the rule
requires, and yet not an umpire fined a single pitcher for the violation
of the rules in question, that we saw.

What the pitching rules should be made to foster is, first--_thorough
command of the ball_, with the consequent accuracy of aim in delivery;
secondly--the substitution of _skilful strategy_ in delivery in the
place of mere intimidating speed; thirdly--the avoidance of the wear and
tear of an extremely swift delivery of the ball; fourthly--the
prevention of obstacles to successful base running, in the way of
allowing too many balk movements in preventing stolen bases. These
desirable objects were almost impossible of attainment under the
badly-worded rules in existence in 1894.

In regard to the wearing of the catcher's "big mitt" by infielders in
1894, it is worthy of note that that first-class utility man of the
Philadelphia team, "Lave" Cross, while wearing a catcher's mitt as third
baseman--a large one at that, too--used it to such advantage that it was
next to impossible for a ball hit to his position to get by him. At
times it was simply laughable to see him stop ground hits. To wear such
gloves is making a travesty of skilful infield work in stopping hard
hit, bounding or ground balls. But with the speedy batting of the hard
ball now in use, the stopping of hard hit balls in the infield becomes
dangerous to the fingers without the aid of small gloves. But no such
glove as the catcher's mitt should be allowed to be used save by the
catchers or first basemen. In this position the "mitt" in question is a
necessity in view of the great speed of the pitcher's delivery and the
extremely wild, swift throwing from the field positions to first
base. It should be borne in mind that in the days when gloves were not
worn, when the pitching was far less swift than now, even then broken
and split fingers marked nearly every contest, and behind the bat four
catchers were needed where one or two will now suffice.

A Washington scribe, in commenting on Manager Schmelz's work in 1894,
said: "Schmelz is a base ball man from the crown of his head to the
soles of his feet, and we have been taught to believe here that when he
says he will do a thing he comes pretty near fulfilling his
prediction. If the team gets a fairly good start at the beginning of
this season he is just as like as not to let several teams chase him
under the wire in September next. A lack of team-work and a most
deplorable weakness at short, second and third throughout the past
season lost the team many a game."

To this latter list may be added, incompetent captaining of the team by
the noted kicker, Joyce.

The Boston correspondent of the St. Louis Sporting News, in one of his
letters of last winter, sent the following interesting account of an
interview had between Manager Selee, of the Bostons, and a business man
he met on a train last October. The B.M. asked the manager "whether
ball-players, as a class, were a disreputable set of men, who made a
practice of spending their money foolishly, and of saying and doing
things on the ball field that were decidedly objectionable; also if, in
consequence, the interest in the game had not to a very large degree
been on the wane for a number of years past? He said he had read in the
papers of a number of acts that had led him to believe that such was the
case, and that, while formerly he had been an attendant at the games,
that latterly he had lost his desire in that respect, though he still
had an interest in all that is published about the game and the
ball-players." Mr. Selee at once attempted to show the gentleman where
his opinion was at fault, and an interesting conversation was carried on
until the train reached Boston, the gentleman severely criticising the
players and the Boston manager defending them.

The correspondent, in commenting on this, wrote as follows: "This
incident opens anew a topic that has created considerable discussion for
several years, and which was brought most forcibly to the public eye by
a number of cases that occurred during the season of 1894, namely: Has
the rough, rowdy, disreputable, hoodlum element increased or decreased
in the professional arena in the past five or ten years?" Further on he
adds: "Any intelligent, unprejudiced student of the game cannot but
reach the conclusion that in recent years the excessive drinkers, the
foul-mouthed talkers, in short, the worst element in the professional
ranks, has been gradually weeded out, until the evil has been reduced to
almost a minimum, while the intelligence, manliness and exemplary habits
of the players have increased correspondingly; where, even five years
ago, a ball team could be found where a majority of its players were of
the drinking, gambling, disreputable class, to-day can be seen the
results of a great and gratifying reform in the personnel of the teams,
brought about largely by the efforts of the management, who have had
their eyes opened to the trend of public opinion, and have gradually
gotten rid of this unpopular element, and secured in their places
players of a far different plane of morals." Judging from reports of
contests in the League arena in 1894, the reformation above referred to
has been far too slow in its progress for the good of the game. Witness
the novelty in League annals of men fighting each other or striking
umpires on the field, the use of vile language in abuse of umpires, and
the many instances of "dirty" ball playing recorded against the majority
of the League club teams of the past season. "The time was," says the
same writer, "when a ball player's skill was the primary recommendation
for an engagement, his moral qualifications being of a secondary
consideration. To-day, however, while playing skill is, of course, one
of the leading qualities that an applicant for honors on the diamond
field must possess, it does not fill the whole bill by any means. His
habits, his influence among his fellow players, his general reputation
with the public, are also taken into consideration more than before, and
if he can pass muster in all these respects he is eligible for
engagement in all well managed teams."

In commenting on the existing situation of the professional branch of
our grand national game, Mr. Wm. H. Bell, the Kansas correspondent of
the St. Louis Sporting News, says: "The growth and development of our
national game as been wonderful. Its success has been unparalleled in
the world's history of athletic sports, and stands to-day a living
monument to the courage, energy and perseverance of the American
people. When we pause a moment in our contemplation of the brilliant
future of our game and turn a glance back over the past, and try to
realize that less than one generation has lived since the birth of base
ball, and our fathers guided its first feeble steps, even we Americans,
familiar with progress unequaled in the history of the world, are forced
to marvel at the rapid growth of this athletic sport." Further on, on
the same topic, Mr. Bell says very truly: "While base ball has advanced
with great strides, its growth has been normal and healthy. Its success
is not the result of a boom, giving it a fictitious value, its
prosperity is not as an inflated balloon that will collapse when torn by
the knife of adversity. It is but a creation of man, and while its life
has been one of unequaled prosperity it has suffered, as do all things
of this earth. One factor has ever been potent in its success and that
is honesty. The honesty of the game has always been its motto, and
though often assailed has still remained intact. This, alone, has gained
for baseball a foothold in the hearts of the American people that
nothing can dislodge. Americans are known the world over as lovers of
fair and honest sport, and to base ball they have given their unswerving
allegiance." Here is a merited compliment to the National League from
the same able pen: "Our national game was never so firmly established in
the hearts of the people as at the present time. It is safe in the hands
of true and tried men, who are devoting their lives to its success. It
is dominated and controlled by that grand old organization, the National
League, which for twenty years has been the great exponent of the game,
and has done more to advance the game than any other factor. The League
has, during its life, stood on one platform, "honesty and purity in base
ball," and has always retained the confidence and respect of the
people. It has elevated the game until to-day base ball stands on a firm
foundation of popular approval unequaled by any other athletic
sport. While the game has advanced with marvelous rapidity it has
experienced short periods of depression and stagnation during its career
of thirty years. It has had enemies who have sought to pervert it for
their own uses. It has been all but torn asunder by civil war. But each
time it has bravely met the issue and in the end triumphed. It is just
now recovering from the effects of a civil war which all but destroyed
it. The rapidity with which it has recovered has been wonderful and is
to me a greater proof of prosperity and success than any success that
could come to it while enjoying a long period of peace." We regret not
having space to quote more at length from Mr. Bell's very able article
published in the Sporting News of January 12th last.

       *       *       *       *        *

The Following Paragraph, Published In The New York Clipper Of February
5, 1895, Tells A Quiet Little Story Well Worthy Of Record In The Guide:
"A.G. Spalding, Of The Chicago Club, Was Asked How So Much Stock Of The
New York Club Came To Be Owned By Outside Parties, And He Said: 'well, I
Will Tell You. During The Troublous Brotherhood Times Of 1890, Along In
July, I Think, I Was Suddenly Summoned To New York. I Went Direct To
Mr. Abell's House, By Request, Entirely Oblivious Of The Object Of The
Sudden Call, And There Met Soden Of Boston, Reach Of Philadelphia, Byrne
Of Brooklyn, Brush Of Indianapolis, And One Or Two Others. There We
Received The Pleasant Information From John B. Day That The New York
Club Was Financially At The End Of Its Rope, And Must Have Immediate
Assistance. Imagine Our Surprise When We Were Told That The Club Must
Have $80,000 At Once To Carry It Through The Season, Or The New York
Club Must Give Up Its End Of The Fight. When We Had Collected Our
Senses Sufficiently To Speak, It Was The General Opinion That If The New
York Club Failed At That Stage Of The Game, The Fight With The
Brotherhood Was Lost, And The Future Of The Old National League Was, To
Say The Least, Uncertain; So It Was Finally Decided That We Must Save
The New York Club At All Hazards, And Before We Separated That Night I
Agreed To Provide $20,000, Soden And Brush Came Forward With Similar
Amounts, And The Balance Was Taken By Reach, Abell And One Or Two
Others, As I Remember. It Was Pretty Costly, But That Prompt Act Saved
The National League, And, By Saving It, The Future Of Professional Base
Ball In This Country Was, In My Opinion, Also Saved. This Will Explain
How I First Became Interested In The New York Club, And, As A Result,
Find Myself Criticised For Ever Being Permitted To Hold Any Of The
Stock. Of This $20,000 Stock Alloted To Chicago, Anson Took And Paid
Cash For $5,000, Another Chicago Gentleman Took $5,000, My Brother
Walter $5,000 And Myself $5,000. Afterward I Sold Or Practically Gave My
Stock To My Brother, And I Think He Picked Up Some More While He Was A
Director Of The Club. That Brotherhood Fight Was A Great Fight, And One
That Will Probably Never Be Duplicated. The Real Inside History Of That
Struggle, And Its Final Settlement, Was Never Written, But If It Ever
Is, It Will Prove Quite Interesting, As Well As Quite A Surprise To The
Base Ball Men Of That Day. But Why Talk In This Strain Any Longer. You
Know I Am Out Of Active Base Ball, And These Reminiscences Simply
Emphasize The Fact That I Ought To Be Out Of It, For I Am Getting Too
Old.'"

What A Commentary On The Selfish Greed Of The Overpaid Star Players Of
The "Out-For-The-Stuff" Class Of The Professional Fraternity
Mr. Spalding's Account Of One Costly Result Of The Players' Revolt Of
1890 The Above Story Presents. It Also Tells The True Story Of How The
Above-Named Magnates Of The Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Brooklyn And
Indianapolis Clubs Of 1890 Came To Be Financially Interested In The New
York Club, Not For Profit, But To Save The Disruption Of The League.

       *       *       *       *       *

The veteran Comiskey thus explains the difference in one special
respect, between a seasoned player and a _colt_--and he is one who ought
to know, you know. He said, in an interview: "No one appreciates the
superiority of hustling, aggressive youngsters over the old standbys of
the diamond more than I do. A seasoned player, as a rule, develops into
a mechanical player who is always watching his averages and keeping tab
on himself. While he may be too loyal to shirk, he will not take a
chance which he is not compelled to. Especially is this true in running
bases. How many of these old players will slide or go into a bag when
they are blocked off? Very few. On the other hand, a young player
appreciates that he has to make a reputation, while the old player, who
has one to protect, is in the business for a livelihood and nothing
else. Popular applause has lost its favor for him, and, while it is not
unwelcome, it does not stimulate him to renewed exertions as it did when
he began his career. It is entirely different with the man who is trying
to establish himself in the major league. An ambitious young player
thinks that the game depends upon him, and is dead sure that every crank
agrees with him. Give him a good send-off in the papers, or let his
manager commend him for a creditable piece of work, and he will break
his neck in his efforts to deserve another installment to-morrow. The
public demands snappy ball, and the young players are the only ones who
can serve up that article."

In his remarks, Comiskey furthermore said: "The good effect of a
manager's or captain's praise of a 'colt' is surprising. Both of these
officials of the League clubs, almost without exception, are apt to be
silent as the grave when a player makes a good point or a fine stop or
catch; but the moment he fails to make an almost impossible play then
comes the ill-natured snarl or the rutty growl. Harry Wright stands out
alone as the only manager or captain to encourage a player with praise."

       *       *       *       *       *

A Philadelphia scribe, in commenting on the rowdy ball playing of 1894
in the League ranks, says: "We could fill pages with evidence of the
rowdyism indulged in by the majority of the League teams during the
season of 1894, and that, too, if we were only to confine ourselves to
the local reports of the season at Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia,
Baltimore, and half a dozen other cities." As the Cleveland Leader had
it, in commenting upon one of the Baltimore-Cleveland games:

"I say it with reluctance--for I have always admired Ned Hanlon's
pluck--that the national game never received so severe a set-back as it
did during the last Baltimore series here. The effort to spike players,
the constant flow of profanity and vulgarity, the incessant and idiotic
abuse of an umpire, all combined to make the Baltimore club--that local
people have been led to believe was made of a crowd of earnest, honest
players--thoroughly despised and detested. In ten years' experience in
scoring games in Cleveland I have never heard such a torrent of
vulgarity, profanity and brutal, senseless abuse heaped upon an umpire
as Lynch stood from the Baltimore players upon the field here."

Similar charges against visiting teams were made by the Pittsburgh
people against the Cleveland team; by the Philadelphia scribes against
the Bostons, etc. In fact, proof, and plenty of it, was easily
attainable from the reports from every League city during 1894, to a
more or less extent.

The question apropos to this comment is, "What are you going to do about
it" in 1895, Messrs. Magnates?

       *       *       *       *       *

John Rowe, the veteran player, who was one of the "Big Four,"
transferred from the Buffalo club to the Detroit club, in the fall of
1885, is a firm believer in Southern trips during the preliminary
season, to get the players in condition for a championship season. In
speaking on that subject, he said: "The year the Detroits won the
National League pennant we went South, and before the regular season
opened that team had played over 40 games. In consequence we were in
the acme of condition, and some of the teams nearly lost their breath
when they tackled us for the first time. The men could hit like fiends,
and field fast and perfect. There were no cases of 'charley horse' in
our team, and as for 'glass arms,' they were not included in our
outfit. It is a great thing, I tell you, and the managers who take their
men into a warm climate are doing a sensible act. According to my idea
the plan is to first practice until the players become limbered up, say
for a week or so, before attempting to play a game. Then get in as many
games as possible, without overdoing it, until the regular schedule
begins, In the exhibition games the experiments can be tried out, and
the men will gradually learn to play together, which means much to a
club. Of course, there is more or less luck in base ball, but at the
same time luck can't win alone all the time. Team-work and an agreeable
manager count a long ways toward winning a pennant." We would add to the
last line, that the absence of drinking and hoodlumism in the ranks is
equally a necessity.

       *       *       *       *       *

In the arena of minor leagues, in professional baseball, outside of the
sectional leagues, like those of the Western, Eastern, Southern, New
England and other like leagues, there is no class of minor leagues which
is so much fostered as individual State leagues. Trio or duo State
leagues should be avoided except in very exceptional cases. In the
organization of the various minor leagues in existence, one special
point has been too much neglected, and that is the importance of making
the league's pennant race specially attractive by the attractive
character of the honors to be won. Sectional leagues, made up of
well-arranged circuits, present as good attractions in their
championship honors at stake as that of the great major league, and next
to these come the pennant races of State leagues. But what special
object, in this respect, is there to strike for in the championships of
trio or duo State leagues? None whatever. They are mere gate-money
organizations, lacking all of the attractive features of sectional and
State league pennant races. State leagues also possess the advantage of
not interfering with the interests of the sectional leagues which
include State clubs. Take any State in which professional base ball
flourishes, and in the State there will be found two classes of
professional clubs, viz., the one strong class, which exist in the
larger cities of the State, and the weaker class which represents the
smaller towns. The sectional leagues, of course, seek to attach the
former to their circuits, leaving the latter eligible for State league
circuits.

       *       *       *       *       *

For many years past columns of space in papers making base ball a
specialty have been occupied with long arrays of figures giving the
averages of the players in the batting and fielding departments of the
game. To such an extent has this feature of the annual statistics of the
game been carried that the records based upon these averages have come
to be regarded by the players as the primary object in view during each
season's work in the field. As a result of this system those club
directors and managers who have never fully examined into the merits of
the subject, and who are not, therefore, aware of the fact that, as
criterions of the most skilful play in each department, these averages
are comparatively useless, have been led into the costly error of making
their selections for their teams each season upon the basis of the
figures of the players' averages, and hence the customary announcement
made at the beginning of each season that "our team has the best batting
average of the season." It is about time that the fallacy of this
average business should be shown up in its true light and that the
existing system of making out averages should be so changed as to make
it some sort of a test of a player's skill in his home position, which
it certainly is not now. The worst of this average business as it
prevails now is that it is a powerful incentive for every player to make
"playing for a record" his principal object in his season's work, and
that all-important duty, "playing for the side," a matter of secondary
consideration.

       *       *       *       *       *

The cranks' title of "Giants," given years ago to the New York club's
team, has become a misnomer. The team most entitled to it in 1894 was
that of the Chicago club, no other club team making such a show of
heavyweight players last season as did Anson's real "Giants," as will be
seen by the appended record. Look at the figures of their biggest men:

--------------------------------------------
                       Height       Weight
                       Feet  Inches  lbs.
--------------------------------------------
Schriver, catcher         5      10   185
Camp, pitcher             6           160
Anson, first base         6       1   202
L. Camp, second base      6           165
Parrott, third base       5      11   160
Clayton, short stop        6       1   180
Decker, left field        6       1   180
Lange, centre field       6       1   180
Dungan, right field       5      11   180
                         ---- ------ ----
  Average                 6           173
--------------------------------------------

How does Murphy, Fuller, Burke, Ward _et al_ stand in weight and size
compared to the above "Giants"?

       *       *       *       *       *

Here is something worthy of note by club managers who begin to get their
teams together each spring, which we clipped from the St. Louis Sporting
News of last December. The editor of the News said: "The player that is
on the upward path is the man for success. He is playing for something
far more than the salary he gets. He is looking forward to a place in
the foremost ranks of the nation's ball players. Consequently he proves
to be a hard worker at all times. He tries to land his club in the top
notch, and his record, for the part he took, stands out as a
recommendation to all the world. On the other hand, the older player,
who has made his record and is going down again, has lost all his
ambition. He can put no life into the club, his ginger has been expended
in the days gone by, and the people look upon him as a back number. He
sticks to the profession generally for a livelihood. He wants to play
so as to hold his place, but he has lost the powers that he once had,
and cannot do what he would like to accomplish. The old-timers had
better get a hump on themselves this year, else will the youngsters
drive them out of the business."

       *       *       *       *       *

The well-known base ball writer, Mr. Pringle, was right when he said:
"It is useless to get new rules until existing ones have been rigidly
enforced and tested." It is an undeniable fact that the umpires of 1894,
almost without exception, failed to properly enforce the rules governing
the umpire's duties. In this regard Mr. Pringle said: "The rules
relating to the duties of umpires are all right. They have power to stop
all rowdy conduct on the field, but the trouble has been the lack of
nerve on the part of umpires to enforce the rules." This, and the fact
that the presidents and directors of clubs who governed the managers and
captains of teams, were largely to blame in the matter for not backing
up the umpires as they should have done. The latter have arduous duties
enough to discharge as it is without their finding obstacles in their
way in the partisan actions of club officials who control club managers
and captains. When this class supports the umpires against the club
teams it will be time enough to lay the whole onus of hoodlumism in the
ranks on the umpires--not until then.

       *       *       *       *       *

A Philadelphia scribe hits the nail on the head when, in commenting on
the existing abuses of kicking and dirty ball playing in the League
arena, he says: "If the club owners would take the initiative in
enforcing decorum upon their players, upon pain of fine or suspension,
instead of shifting the burden and onus upon the umpire, the problem of
order at ball games would be solved at once. But the majority of
magnates and managers, while openly, hypocritically, deploring dirty ball
playing, secretly wink at it and rather enjoy it, especially if their
particular club secures advantages from it. The players all know this,
and so do the umpires; hence the former presume upon it, while the
latter weaken in their intent and desire to strictly enforce the
rules. When the duty of preserving order on the field and decorum among
the players is devolved upon the clubs, who represent direct authority,
power and responsibility, instead of irresponsible umpires, then, and
not till then will the evils complained of cease, or at least be
mitigated."


Al Wright, the base ball editor of the New York Clipper, in its issue of
February 15, 1895, had this noteworthy paragraph in its columns: "Frank
C. Bancroft, the business manager of the Cincinnati club, in speaking
about the equalization of the players of the major league teams, said:
'I am not a firm believer in the prevalent practice of selling the best
men in a weak or tail-end team to one of the leading clubs, and register
a vigorous kick against it. My plan is that the National League shall
pass a rule forbidding the sale of a player from a club in the second
division, to a club in the first division. I think this would, in a
measure, prevent some of the hustling to dispose of a clever man for the
sake of the cash that is in the trade. There is certainly some good
arguments in the idea, and not one against it. The clubs of the second
division have been too willing to dispose of their best men for a decent
cash consideration, and the damage that has been done to the game is
incalculable.'"


A young Brooklyn writer, in commenting on the threatened war on the
reserve rule which Messrs. Richter, Pfeffer, Buckenberger and Barnie
were active in promoting, said: "Since the National League and American
Association amalgamated at Indianapolis in 1892 the League has not been
a glorious success." The reply to this is a statement of fact which
contradicts the above assertion very flatly. The reorganized National
League started its new career in the spring of 1892 with an
indebtedness, resulting from the base ball war of 1891, of over
$150,000. At the close of the season of 1892 it had partially redeemed
its heavy indebtedness, and by the close of the season of 1893 it had
paid the debt off in full, and it closed the season of 1894 with a
majority of its clubs having a surplus in their treasuries, and that,
too, despite the hardest kind of times of financial depression. If this
is not a glorious success, pray what is?


A Pittsburgh scribe, in commenting on the dead failure of the scheme to
organize a new American Association, one object of which was to levy war
upon the now permanently established rule of the National Agreement
clubs, very pointedly said last winter that "such a scheme would be
folly of the maddest kind. There is not a good reason, theoretical or
practical, sentimental or otherwise, in support of it. The success of
base ball, to a very great extent, depends on public sentiment, and we
have seen what a base ball war did to that sentiment four years
ago. There is one solid basis for all base ball organizations, and that
is the reserve rule. The proposed organization ignores this fundamental
and necessary principle, and consequently can only be compared to that
foolish man who built a house on sand."


During the decade of the eighties the League's code of rules had this
special clause in it:

"Any player who shall be in any way interested in any bet or wager on
the game in which he takes part, either as a player, umpire, or scorer,
shall be suspended from legal service as a member of any professional
Association club for the season during which he shall have violated this
rule."

The question is, Why was this important and much-needed rule taken from
the code?

No player can play ball as he should do who is personally interested in
any bet on the content he is engaged in; that is a fact too true to be
contradicted. Independent of this fact, too. Experience has plainly
shown that the step of betting on a game he plays in is but a short one
from accepting bribes to lose a game. The rule should long ago have been
replaced in the code.


The Cleveland Leader says: "The patrons of the game have begun to
realize the true inwardness of scientific batting, as shown in the
securing of single bases by well-timed place hits, safe taps of
swiftly-pitched balls to short outfield, and skilful efforts in
sacrifice hitting and bunting, every such hit forwarding a run or
sending a run in. Of course, to occupants of the bleaching boards, as a
rule, the great attraction is the long hit for a home run, which is made
at the cost of a 120-yards sprint, and at the loss of all chances for
skilful fielding. But to the best judges of scientific batting the safe
tap of the swiftly pitched ball, the well-judged bunt or the effort to
make a safe hit to right field, which, if it fails, at least yields a
sacrifice hit, is far more attractive than the old rut of slugging for
home runs and making fungo hits to the outfielders."

There is something to fight for in the winning of a State league's
championship honors, while there is little or nothing at stake in a trio
or duo State league. Suppose each State had a four or six club circuit,
and at the close of its season, each August or September, what a paying
series of October games could be arranged in the Southern section of the
country in October for a grand championship series for the prize of
leading all the State leagues of the country for the honors of the
champion pennant of State league organizations?  By all means let State
leagues be organized, until every State in the Union--North, South, East
and West--has its representative State league.

The fickle nature of base ball "rooters" was conspicuously shown at the
Polo Grounds in 1894. At the end of the June campaign, when the New York
"Giants" stood sixth in the race, Ward's stock among the local "cranks"
and "rooters," stood below par; at the close of the July campaign,
however, that same stock was at a premium; and yet it was the same John
M. Ward at the head of the "Giants." In May there were "none so poor to
do him reverence." In August, John was carried off the field a hero. Of
such are the "cranks" and "rooters."

A Toronto paper says: "Spalding Brothers will present to the champion
club of all regularly organized base ball leagues, junior or senior, in
Canada, a valuable flag, 11x28, pennant shaped, made of serviceable
white bunting, red lettered, and valued at $20. The flags will be
forwarded, duty free, immediately after the season closes. Each league
must consist of four or more clubs, and each club must play not less
than 12 championship games." This is a good plan to encourage the game
on foreign soil. It has worked well in England and Australia, too.

Among the magnates of the League who could be seen at nearly all of the
home games of the twelve clubs during the past season were the Boston
triumvirate, Messrs. Soden, Conant and Billings; the irrepressible
Charley Byrne, of Brooklyn; the handsome Vonderhorst, of Baltimore; the
smiling Eddie Talcott, of New York; the noted "Philadelphia lawyer"
Rogers, of Philadelphia; the "Boss Manager" Von der Ahe, of St. Louis;
the energetic Kerr, of Pittsburgh, and Al Spalding's successor,
President Hart, of Chicago.

The Louisville team was a strong one as regards its individual players.
But it lacked harmony in its ranks and suffered from cliques. With two
ex-captains in its team, besides the one who ran it, but little else
could be expected. Ambitious ex-captains are obstacles in the way of
successful management of a team. One regular captain should be the rule,
with an acknowledged lieutenant--a pair like Comiskey and Latham, who
worked the old St. Louis "Browns" up to being four-time winners of
pennant honors.

It is a noteworthy fact that Anson has been manager and captain of the
Chicago club's teams since 1877, and from that year to this he has taken
his team to the goal of the championship five years of the six the club
won the pennant, A.G. Spalding being the manager in 1876, the first year
the club won the honors. Fifteen successive years of management in one
club beats the League's records in that respect.


[Illustration: P. T. POWERS, President Eastern League.]
[Illustration: Yale Team, '94.][Illustration: Harvard Team, '94.]
[Illustration: University of Pennsylvania Team, '94.]
[Illustration: Princeton Team, '94.]



#EASTERN LEAGUE SCHEDULE.#
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Clubs.      At Toronto.        At Buffalo.        At Rochester.

-------------------------------------------------------------------
            ................   May 29, 30, 30     June 6, 7, 8
Toronto     ................   June 17, 18, 19    July 6, 8
            ................   July 15, 16        Aug. 14, 15, 16
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            May 24, 24         ................   June 1, 3, 4
Buffalo     May 31, July 1,2    ................   July 9, 10
            Sept. 11, 12, 14   ................   Aug 17, 19, 20
--------------------------------------------------------------------
            June 10, 11, 12    June 13, 14, 15    ................
Rochester   July 12, 13        July 4, 4          ................
            Aug. 24, 26, 27    Aug 21, 22, 23     ................
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            June 13, 14, 15    June 10, 11, 12    May 29, 30, 30
Syracuse    July 9, 10         July 12, 13        July 1, 2
            Aug. 21, 22, 23    Aug 24, 26, 27     Sept. 10, 11, 15
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Wilkes-     May 16, 17, 18     May 13, 14, 15     May 23, 25, 27
  Barre     July 26, 27        July 24, 25        July 20, 22
            Sept. 3, 4, 5      Sept. 6, 7, 9      Aug 28, 29, 30
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            May 13, 14, 15     May 16, 17, 18     May 20, 21, 22
Scranton    July 24, 25        July 26, 27        July 18, 19
            Aug. 31, Sep. 2,2  Aug. 28, 29, 30    Sept. 6, 7, 9
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Spring-     May 20, 21, 22     May 23, 25, 27     May 13, 14, 15
  field     July 20, 22        July 18, 19        July 26, 27
            Aug. 28, 29, 30    Aug. 31, Sep.2, 2  Sept. 3, 4, 5
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Provi-      May 23, 25, 27     May 20, 21, 22     May 16, 17, 18
  dence     July 18, 19        July 20, 22        July 24, 25
            Sept. 6, 7, 9      Sept. 3, 4, 5      A'g 31, Sep. 2, 2
-------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Clubs.      At Syracuse.       At Wilkes-Barre.   At Scranton.

-------------------------------------------------------------------
            June 1, 3, 4       May 6, 7, 8        May 9, 10, 11
Toronto     July 4, 4          June 21, 22        June 24, 25
            Aug. 17, 19, 20    Aug. 10, 12, 13    Aug. 7, 8, 9
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            June 6, 7, 8       May 9, 10, 11      May 6, 7, 8
Buffalo     July 6, 8          June 24, 25        June 21, 22
            Aug. 14, 15, 16    Aug 7, 8, 9        Aug 10, 12, 13
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            June 17, 18, 19    Apr. 29, 30, May 1  May 2, 3, 4
Rochester   July 15, 16        June 28, 29        June 26, 27
            Sept. 12, 13, 14   July 30, 31 Ag. 1  Aug 2, 3, 5
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            ................   May 2, 3, 4        Apr. 29, 30, May 1
Syracuse    ................   June 26, 27        June 28, 29
            ................   Aug 2, 3, 5        July 30, 31 Ag. 1
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Wilkes-     May 20, 21, 22     ................   July 1, 3, 4
  Barre     July 18, 19        ................   July 4, 4
            Aug. 31, Sep. 2,2  ................   Aug 14, 15, 16
-------------------------------------------------------------------
            May 23, 25, 27     May 29, 30, 30     ................
Scranton    July 20, 22        July 1, 2          ................
            Sept. 3, 4, 5      Aug. 17, 19, 20    ................
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Spring-     May 16, 17, 18     June 6, 7, 8       June 10, 11, 12
  field     July 24, 25        July 15, 16        July 12, 13
            Sept. 6, 7, 9      Sept. 13, 14, 15   Sept. 10, 11, 12
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Provi-      May 13, 14, 15     June 10, 11, 12    June 6, 7, 8
  dence     July 26, 27        July 12, 13        July 15, 16
            Aug. 28, 29, 30    Sept. 10, 11, 12   Sept. 13, 14, 15
-------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------

Clubs.      At Springfield.    At Providence.

------------------------------------------------
            Apr 29, 30, May 1  May 2, 3, 4
Toronto     June 28, 29        June 26, 27
            Aug. 2, 3, 5       July. 30, 31 Ag.1
------------------------------------------------
            May 2, 3, 4        Ap. 29, 30, May 1
Buffalo     June 26, 27        June 28, 29
            July. 30, 31 Ag.1   Aug. 2, 3, 5
------------------------------------------------
            May 9, 10, 11      May 6, 7, 8
Rochester   June 24, 25        June 21, 22
            Aug 10, 12, 13     Aug 7, 8, 9
------------------------------------------------
            May 6, 7, 8        May 9, 10, 11
Syracuse    June 21, 22        June 24, 25
            Aug 7, 8, 9        Aug 10, 12, 13
------------------------------------------------
Wilkes-     June 17, 18 19     June 13, 14, 15
  Barre     July 6, 8          July 9, 10
            Aug. 21, 22, 23    Aug. 24, 26, 27
------------------------------------------------
            June 13, 14, 15    June 17, 18 19
Scranton    July 9, 10         July 6, 8
            Aug. 24, 26, 27    Aug. 21, 22, 23
------------------------------------------------
Spring-     ................   May 29, 30, 30
  field     ................   July 4, 4
            ................   Aug. 17, 18, 20
------------------------------------------------
Provi-      June 1, 3, 4       ................
  dence     July 1, 2          ................
            Aug. 14, 15, 16    ................
------------------------------------------------



#THE EASTERN LEAGUE.#

The cities composing the Eastern League circuit are Toronto, Canada;
Buffalo, N.Y.; Rochester, N.Y.; Syracuse, N.Y.; Providence, R.I.;
Springfield, Mass.; Scranton,, Pa., and Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

The officers are; P.T. Powers, President, Secretary and Treasurer;
headquarters, A.G. Spalding & Bros., 126 Nassau St., New York.

Board of Directors: James Franklin, Buffalo; George N. Kuntzsch,
Syracuse; William H. Draper, Providence, and E.F. Bogert, Wilkes-Barre.

The base ball magnates of the Eastern League held their annual schedule
meeting at the Fifth Avenue Hotel March 13th.

These delegates were present: President P.T. Powers, James Franklin and
Charles H. Morton, Buffalo ; E.A. Johnson and John M. Battey,
Providence; Charles F. Leimgruber and J.C. Chapman, Rochester; William
Barnie, Scranton; I.E. Sanborn and Thomas E. Burns, Springfield; George
N. Kuntzsch, Syracuse; William Stark and Charles Maddock, Toronto;
E.F. Bogert, L.W. Long and Dan Shannon, Wilkes-Barre.

The League has a great staff of umpires for this season, as will be seen
from the following list appointed at the meeting: Tim C. Hurst, of
Ashland, Pa.; Herman Doescher, of Binghamton; John H. Gaffney, of
Worcester, and Charles N. Snyder, of Washington. It was voted to
increase the staff to five, and President Powers will sign another
umpire. He will also keep a number of reserve men in readiness to fill
in as substitutes in place of local men, as formerly.

The constitution was subjected to a few minor changes, the most
important being the change of date for the payment of the guarantee to
finish the season ($250 per club) from May 1st to April 15th.

John Depinet, of Erie, and Lawrence T. Fassett, of Albany, were elected
honorary members of the League, with all privileges of games, etc.

The Eastern League adopted the Spalding League Ball as the Official Ball
for 1895, and it will be used in all League games.



#The Eastern League Averages.#


THE RECORDS MADE BY EACH PLAYER IN BATTING AND FIELDING ACCORDING TO
OFFICIAL FIGURES--THE AVERAGES OF THE CLUBS.

Sheehan of Springfield leads the entire batting list with the fat
percentage of .416. Patchen of Scranton was second with .392, and Mulvey
of Allentown-Yonkers was third, .391. All three of these are ahead of
Drauby's record, .379, which led the Eastern League the previous
year. Rudderham led the pitchers in fielding his position.

The club averages are significant. They show that the Providence
champions turned up third in batting, and led the list in fielding. Thus
they deserved to win, for the Springfields, second in batting, are third
in fielding, tied with Troy; and Buffalo, first in batting, comes sixth
in fielding. Scranton and Yonkers see-saw on the tail end. Wilkes-Barre
is below the centre of the heap in both fielding and batting. In fact,
the sum up of club averages in stick work and field work indicates that
the clubs finished about as they deserved. The figures will give
opportunity for a couple of hours study.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               1   2
                                                               s   n
                                                               t   d    P
                                                     A                  e
                                                 G   t         B   B    r
                                                 a        R    a   a    c
                                                 m   B    u    s   s    e
                                                 e   a    n    e   e    n
                                                 s   t    s    s   s    t
NO. NAME.         CLUB.                          .   .    .    .   .    .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1 Sheehan       Springfield                   32  144  31   60   2  .415
  2 Parchen       Scranton                      32  135  15   53   5  .392
  3 Mulvey        Yonkers                       22   92  13   36   2  .391
  4 Kelley        Yonkers                       15   61  11   23   2  .377
  5 P. Sweeney    Yonkers                       21   86  21   33   3  .372
  6 Knight        Wilkes-Barre and Providence  113  493 108  183  34  .371
  7 Bassett       Providence                   109  484 125  178  32  .367
  8 Smith         Buffalo                       24   96  14   35   3  .364
    Rafter        Binghamton and Syracuse       43  184  31   67  14  .364
 10 Minnehan      Syracuse                     115  504  95  182  11  .361
 11 O'Brien       Binghamton                    15   61   9   22   0  .360
 12 Griffin       Buffalo and Syracuse         106  465 103  167  14  .359
 13 Raymond       Binghamton                    22   92  23   33   4  .358
 14 Vickery       Buffalo and Springfield       54  199  47   70   8  .356
 15 Shearon       Erie                         103  145 108  158  23  .355
 16 Dowse         Binghamton, Buffalo, and      88  355  76  126   5  .354
                  Troy
 17 Power         Binghamton and Syracuse       79  328  72  116  15  .353
 18 Collins       Buffalo                      125  562 126  198  18  .352
 19 Drauby        Buffalo                       97  436 126  153  12  .350
 20 Shannon       Wilkes-Barre                  77  347  77  121  21  .348
 21 Nadeau        Springfield                  110  469 128  162  30  .345
 22 Field         Erie                         109  436  71  150  16  .344
    Sweeney       Binghamton                    27  116  21   40   0  .344
 24 Campfield     Wilkes-Barre                  29   94  20   32   1  .340
    Dixon         Providence                    80  320  58  109  33  .340
 26 Rogers        Providence                   112  492  97  167  37  .339
 27 Lytle         Wilkes-Barre and Binghamton  101  479 115  162  39  .338
    Carr          Binghamton                    15   71  13   24   2  .338
 29 Weddige       Buffalo                       21   86  19   29   1  .337
    Wood          Yonkers                       22   86  21   29   2  .337
 31 Lynch         Springfield                  110  469 127  158  44  .336
    Kilroy        Syracuse                      30   98  22   33   8  .336
    Clymer        Buffalo                      121  523  97  176  36  .336
 34 Lyons         Providence                   108  511 131  171  37  .334
    Johnson       Troy and Scranton            111  463 221  155  14  .334
    Bottenus      Springfield                  110  440 111  147  22  .334
    Betts         Wilkes-Barre                 107  463 114  155  21  .334
 38 Gillen        Wilkes-Barre                 106  417  89  139  17  .333
    Nicholson     Erie                         105  453 115  151  71  .333
 40 Lewee         Buffalo                       71  262  56   87   3  .332
 41 Breckenridge  Troy and Springfield         113  440  98  146  11  .331
    Lally         Erie                         108  458  78  152   8  .331
 43 O'Brien       Buffalo                       60  276  77   91  14  .329
    Payne         Syracuse and Binghamton       52  197  37   65   5  .329
 45 Cahill        Scranton and Troy             91  402  73  132  26  .328
 46 Scheffler     Troy and Springfield         111  459 138  150  29  .326
 47 Friel         Binghamton, Scranton, &       60  251  58   81  17  .322
                  Springfield
    Pickett       Troy                          71  304  54   98  12  .322
    Hoffer        Buffalo                       76  282  63   91   5  .322
 50 Lezotte       Wilkes-Barre                  78  336  73  108   8  .321
 51 Shannon       Springfield                  109  493 115  158  15  .320
 52 Gore          Binghamton                    48  191  46   61   5  .319
 53 Boyd          Buffalo                       82  339  76  105  10  .318
 54 Berger        Erie                          67  255  50   80   3  .313
  " Urquhart      Buffalo                      101  402  80  126   7  .313
 56 Bausewein     Syracuse                      44  146   8   45   4  .308
  " Demont        Buffalo, Bingh'ton & Scranton 36  146  31   45   4  .308
  " Burns         Springfield                   36  146  27   45   7  .308
 59 Daly          Buffalo                       82  336  82  103   7  .306
 60 Hoover        Syracuse and Scranton         83  344  74  105  21  .305
 61 Warner        Wilkes-Barre                  97  387  71  118  17  .304
 62 Barnett       Binghamton and Syracuse       42  132  23   40   2  .303
  " Hanrahan      Binghamton and Syracuse       54  221  36   67   4  .303
 64 J. Hess       Wilkes-Barre and Scranton     78  348  72  105   8  .301
 65 T. Hess       Syracuse                      98  381  64  114   6  .299
 66 Gunson        Erie                          64  261  40   78   2  .298
 67 Whitehead     Binghamton and Scranton       30  131  28   39   8  .297
 68 Welch         Syracuse                     108  422 111  125  81  .296
  " Eagan         Syracuse                     111  435  97  129  30  .296
 70 Cross         Syracuse                      69  247  62   73  34  .295
  " Duryea        Binghamton and Yonkers        53  190  24   56   6  .295
  " Heine         Binghamton and Buffalo        50  203  35   60   8  .295
 73 Simon         Troy and Syracuse            114  485 123  143  22  .294
  " Faatz         Syracuse                      25  102  15   30   0  .294
 75 Donnelly      Troy and Springfield          83  361  91  104  15  .288
  " Wilson        Syracuse                      27  104  18   30   1  .288
  " Pettit        Providence and Wilkes-Barre   78  368  65  106  12  .288
 78 Conley        Syracuse                      62  247  30   71   9  .287
  " Brown         Wilkes-Barre                  54  233  28   67   2  .287
 80 Keenan        Wilkes-Barre                  47  175  24   50   1  .286
 81 Gruber        Troy and Springfield          45  151  33   40   0  .284
 82 Stearns       Wilkes-Barre and Buffalo      76  307  76   37  14  .283
  " Lehane        Scranton and Springfield      99  386  67  110   5  .283
 84 Stricker      Providence                   108  436  88  123  52  .282
  " Cooney        Providence                    98  422  68  119  28  .282
 86 Delaney       Binghamton and Scranton       51  188  35   53   6  .281
 87 Mack          Binghamton                    66  272  62   76  10  .278
 88 Van Dyke      Erie                         108  434  66  120  36  .276
 89 Leahy         Springfield                  101  423  96  116  30  .274
 90 Bott          Buffalo                       18   66  11   13   2  .272
 91 Healy         Erie                          37  137  21   37   0  .270
 92 McGinness     Erie                          27   89  11   24   1  .269
 93 Smith         Erie                         108  432 102  115  19  .266
 94 Murray        Providence                   109  430  80  112  68  .260
 95 Murphy        Troy                          29  116  11   30   1  .258
  " Johnson       Buffalo                       51  213  31   55  13  .258
 97 Rogers        Scranton                      21   82  10   21   1  .256
 98 Kuehne        Erie                         106  427  64  109  13  .255
 99 McCauley      Providence                    53  197  33   50  27  .253
100 Phelan        Scranton                      26  103  20   26   8  .252
101 Wise          Yonkers                       20   80  14   20   7  .250
  " Dolan         Binghamton and Springfield    25   84  12   21   0  .250
103 Egan          Providence                    35  105  25   26   9  .247
104 McMahon       Wilkes-Barre                  99  393  43   97   4  .246
105 Lovett        Providence                    16   62   7   15   0  .241
106 Donovan       Scranton, Troy and Yonkers    34  121  12   29   4  .289
107 Sullivan      Providence                    40  155  23   37  10  .238
108 Smith         Troy and Scranton            108  421  67   97   1  .230
108 Coughlin      Springfield                   49  178  26   41   1  .230
110 Messitt       Springfield                   82  112  20   25   2  .228
111 Meekin        Troy and Wilkes-Barre         39  135  28   30   4  .222
112 Fisher        Buffalo                       17   60   5   18   3  .216
112 W. Sweeney    Yonkers                       20   74   7   16   2  .216
114 Costello      Yonkers                       22   86   9   18   1  .209
115 Marshall      Binghamton                    17   62  10   19   0  .206
116 Quarles       Wilkes-Barre and Scranton     35  127  16   26   2  .204
117 Blackburn     Wilkes-Barre and Scranton     18   66   9   13   0  .196
118 Kilroy        Yonkers                       17   64  10   12   4  .187
119 Connors       Binghamton                    19   75  12   14   1  .186
120 Lang          Binghamton                    16   59  19   11   7  .183
121 Herndon       Erie                          47  189  21   29   1  .182
122 Lohbeck       Binghamton                    42  160  20   29   7  .181
123 Phillips      Troy                          15   59   8   10   1  .169
124 Rudderham     Providence                    30  105   7   17   2  .161
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


PITCHERS' FIELDING AVERAGES.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P   A        P
                                                     u   s   E    e
                                                 G   t   s   r    r
                                                 a       i   r    c
                                                 m   O   s   o    e
                                                 e   u   t   r    n
                                                 s   t   s   s    t
No.   Name.        Club.                         .   .   .   .    .
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Rudderham    Providence                   30   9  46   1  .982
  2   Lovett       Providence                   16   7  38   1  .975
  3   Bausewein    Syracuse                     41  14  60   3  .960
  4   Sullivan     Providence                   39   8  72   4  .952
  5   Campfield    Wilkes-Barre                 29   8  49   3  .949
  6   Hoffer       Buffalo                      57  39  92   8  .942
  6   Vickery      Buffalo and Springfield      52  26 122   9  .942
  6   Bott         Buffalo                      18   3  46   3  .942
  9   Keenan       Wilkes-Barre                 38  29  64   6  .939
 10   McGinnis     Erie                         27   6  52   4  .935
 11   Gruber       Troy and Springfield         45   7  77   7  .931
 12   Duryea       Binghamton and Yonkers       40  36  65   9  .918
 13   Blackburn    Scranton and Wilkes-Barre    17   8  25   3  .916
 14   Coughlin     Springfield                  45  19  79   9  .915
 15   Meekin       Troy and Wilkes-Barre        39  29  63   9  .910
 16   Donovan      Troy, Scranton and Yonkers   34  14  55   7  .907
 17   Fisher       Buffalo                      17   6  23   3  .906
 18   Fagan        Providence                   20   9  65   8  .902
 19   Herndon      Erie                         46  23  61  10  .896
 20   Marshall     Binghamton                   13   3  23   3  .896
 21   Quarles      Wilkes-Barre and Scranton    33  13  64   9  .895
 22   Dolan        Binghamton and Springfield   25   4  34   5  .886
 23   Healy        Erie                         34  14  63  16  .885
 24   Delaney      Binghamton and Scranton      50  21  80  12  .884
 25   Kilroy       Syracuse                     27  20  56  10  .883
 26   Barnett      Binghamton and Syracuse      42   4  86  12  .852
 27   Payne        Syracuse and Binghamton      18   9  19  10  .736
---------------------------------------------------------------------


CATCHERS' AVERAGES.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P   A      P
                                                     u   s  E   e
                                                G    t   s  r   r
                                                a        i  r   c
                                                m    O   s  o   e
                                                e    u   t  r   n
                                                s    t   s  s   t
No.   Name.        Club.                        .    .   .  .   .
--------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Lohbeck      Binghamton                  42  138  30  6 .965
  2   Gunson       Erie                        54  157  46  8 .962
  3   Berger       Erie                        58  180  45  9 .961
  4   Dixon        Providence                  63  241  48 12 .960
  5   Cahill       Troy and Scranton           51  161  51 11 .950
  6   Urquhart     Buffalo                     83  321  74 22 .947
  7   Warner       Wilkes-Barre                97  317  71 22 .946
  8   Wilson       Syracuse                    20   71  26  6 .941
  9   Leahy        Springfield                 95  321  76 25 .940
 10   Murphy       Troy                        24   83  10  6 .939
 11   Hess         Syracuse                    89  253  54 22 .933
 12   McCauley     Providence                  53  136  47 23 .913
 13   Boyd         Buffalo                     61  226  37 28 .903
 14   Rafter       Binghamton and Syracuse     43  128  40 20 .893
 15   Patchen      Scranton                    32  114  20 17 .887
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


SHORT STOP AVERAGES.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P   A      P
                                                     u   s  E   e
                                                G    t   s  r   r
                                                a        i  r   c
                                                m    O   s  o   e
                                                e    u   t  r   n
                                                s    t   s  s   t
No.   Name.        Club.                        .    .   .  .   .
--------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Demont       Binghamton and Buffalo      29   68 117 23 .898
  1   Shannon      Springfield                109  245 454 90 .898
  3   Cooney       Providence                  98  148 331 55 .897
  4   Smith        Erie                       106  205 429 75 .894
  5   W. Sweeney   Yonkers                     20   40  78 14 .893
  6   Lewee        Buffalo                     71  146 269 50 .892
  6   Smith        Troy and Scranton          108  139 332 57 .892
  8   Cross        Syracuse                    69  172 275 60 .881
  9   Hanrahan     Syracuse and Binghamton     54   65 166 35 .870
 10   McMahon      Wilkes-Barre                99  218 402 98 .863
 11   Johnson      Buffalo                     49   70 144 39 .845
 12   Lang         Binghamton                  16   20  52 14 .837
 13   Heine        Binghamton and Buffalo      35   75 103 35 .835
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


FIRST BASE AVERAGES.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P   A      P
                                                     u   s  E   e
                                                G    t   s  r   r
                                                a        i  r   c
                                                m    O   s  o   e
                                                e    u   t  r   n
                                                s    t   s  s   t
No.   Name.        Club.                        .    .   .  .   .
--------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Brown        Wilkes-Barre                54  578  30 10 .983
  2   Breckenridge Troy and Springfield       113 1133  37 22 .981
  2   Field        Erie                       109 1092  56 22 .981
  2   Kelly        Yonkers                     12   96  11  2 .981
  5   Lehane       Springfield and Scranton    98  938  64 20 .980
  6   Rogers       Providence                 109  970  42 25 .975
  7   Power        Binghamton and Syracuse     79  728  37 20 .974
  8   Drauby       Buffalo                     46  455  21 14 .971
  8   Faatz        Syracuse                    25  235   4  7 .971
 10   Conley       Syracuse                    62  569  15 19 .968
 11   Stearns      Buffalo and Wilkes-Barre    76  774  24 30 .945
 12   Sweeney      Binghamton                  23  215   9 15 .937
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


SECOND BASE AVERAGES.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P   A      P
                                                     u   s  E   e
                                                G    t   s  r   r
                                                a        i  r   c
                                                m    O   s  o   e
                                                e    u   t  r   n
                                                s    t   s  s   t
No.   Name.        Club.                        .    .   .  .   .
--------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Stricker     Providence                 108  341  308  30 .955
  2   Wise         Yonkers                     20   76   79   8 .950
  3   Lynch        Springfield                 20   70   59   7 .948
  3   Pickett      Troy                        71  241  197  24 .948
  5   Eagan        Syracuse                   111  364  362  40 .947
  6   Clymer       Buffalo                     54  159  171  21 .940
  7   Nicholson    Erie                       105  321  300  42 .937
  8   Cahill       Troy and Scranton           28   75   78  11 .932
  9   Burns        Springfield                 36  104   82  14 .930
 10   O'Brien      Buffalo                     60  192  162  28 .926
 10   Mack         Binghamton                  66  185  206  31 .926
 12   Smith        Buffalo                     13   36   31   7 .905
 13   Shannon      Wilkes-Barre                77  168  221  41 .904
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


THIRD BASE AVERAGES.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P    A         P
                                                     u    s   E     e
                                                G    t    s   r     r
                                                a         i   r     c
                                                m    O    s   o     e
                                                e    u    t   r     n
                                                s    t    s   s     t
No.   Name.        Club.                        .    .    .   .     .
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Bassett    Providence                   109  183  290  46  .911
  2   Kuehne     Erie                         106  154  265  41  .910
  3   Minnehan   Syracuse                     111  165  251  45  .902
  4   Donnelly   Troy and Springfield          83  123  207  36  .901
  5   Whitehead  Binghamton and Scranton       30   43   61  13  .888
  6   Smith      Troy                          16   14   41   7  .887
  6   Lynch      Springfield                   87  203  223  54  .887
  8   Dowse      Buffalo, Troy and Binghamton  67   97  146  36  .870
  9   Mulvey     Yonkers                       22   35   44  12  .858
 10   Gillen     Wilkes-Barre                 106  127  216  67  .836
 11   O'Brien    Binghamton                    15   20   15   9  .818
 12   Phelan     Scranton                      29   19   31  12  .806
 13   Raymond    Binghamton                    22   24   42  17  .795
 14   Weddige    Buffalo                       14   16   20  11  .765
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


FIELDERS' AVERAGES.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     P    A        P
                                                     u    s   E    e
                                                G    t    s   r    r
                                                a         i   r    c
                                                m    O    s   o    e
                                                e    u    t   r    n
                                                s    t    s   s    t
No.   Name.        Club.                        .    .    .   .    .
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  1   Clymer     Buffalo                       61  152   11   4  .976
  2   Drauby     Buffalo                       37   67    5   5  .960
  2   Welch      Syracuse                     108  225   19  10  .960
  4   Lyons      Providence                   108  294   27  14  .956
  4   Gore       Binghamton                    48   99   10   5  .956
  6   Simon      Syracuse and Troy            114  265   15  13  .955
  7   Scheffler  Troy and Springfield         112  175   23  12  .942
  8   Hoffer     Buffalo                       19   45    3   3  .941
  9   Collins    Buffalo                      125  299   34  21  .940
 10   Wood       Yonkers                       22   42    3   3  .937
 11   Griffin    Buffalo and Syracuse         106  178   13  13  .936
 12   Lally      Erie                         108  239   17  18  .934
 13   Knight     Wilkes-Barre and Providence  113  307   13  24  .930
 14   Van Dyke   Erie                         108  219   23  20  .923
 15   Johnson    Troy and Scranton            111  312   24  31  .915
 16   Betts      Wilkes-Barre                 107  302   23  31  .912
 17   Shearon    Erie                         103  163   21  18  .910
 18   Payne      Binghamton and Syracuse       47   58    9   7  .905
 19   Bottenus   Springfield                  110  267    6  31  .898
 20   Daly       Buffalo                       82  137   17  18  .895
 21   Murray     Providence                   108  144   26  21  .890
 22   Lezotte    Wilkes-Barre                  63  112    7  15  .888
 22   Carr       Binghamton                    15   32    2   4  .888
 24   Connors    Binghamton                    19   37    2   5  .886
 25   Hess       Wilkes-Barre and Scranton     74  136    8  20  .878
 26   Nadeau     Springfield                   85  187   17  30  .871
 27   Lytle      Wilkes-Barre and Binghamton   87  196   34  36  .864
 28   Hoover     Syracuse and Scranton         83  152   12  27  .858
 29   Friel      Spr'gf'ld, Binham'n, Scranton 60   96    5  11  .857
 30   Pettit     Providence and Wilkes-Barre   57   98    5  12  .830
 31   Rogers     Scranton                      18   32    2   7  .829
 32   P. Sweeney Yonkers                       17   34    4   8  .825
 33   Costello   Yonkers                       13   28    2   7  .810
 34   Sheehan    Springfield                   32   36    6   7  .728
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


CLUB BATTING AVERAGES.
-----------------------------------------------
                    A         B     S      P
                    t         a     t      e
                              s     o B    r
                    B     R   e H   l a    C
                    a     u     i   e s    e
                    t     n     t   n e    n
                    s     s     s     s    t
 No. CLUB.          .     .     .     .    .
-----------------------------------------------
  1  Buffalo      4630  1022  1500  154  .323
  2  Springfield  4004   942  1268  184  .316
  3  Providence   4210   842  1306  365  .310
  4  Syracuse     4092   814  1260  186  .307
  5  Binghamton   3018   585   919  128  .304
  6  Wilkesbarre  3949   773  1196  136  .302
  6  Erie         4018   751  1214  194  .302
  8  Troy         2775   588   821   97  .295
  9  Scranton     1269   200   372  154  .293
 10  Yonkers       735   118   220   28  .288
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


CLUB FIELDING AVERAGES.
-------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         P
                                         P     A         e
                                         u     s    E    r
                                         t     s    r
                                               i    r    C
                                         O     s    o    e
                                         u     t    r    n
                                         t     s    s    t
No. CLUB.                                .     .    .    .
-------------------------------------------------------------
 1  Providence                        2825  1357  257  .942
 2  Erie                              2776  1399  281  .936
 3  Troy                              1968   940  194  .934
 3  Springfield                       2779  1286  285  .934
 5  Syracuse                          2754  1380  310  .930
 6  Buffalo                           3011  1442  369  .923
 7  Wilkes-Barre                      2457  1191  354  .918
 8  Binghamton                        1916   967  276  .916
 9  Yonkers                            410   263   68  .902
10  Scranton                           794   357  138  .892
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



#The Presidents of the National League.#

This is the twentieth year of the existence of the National League, and
in all that time but four members of the League have occupied the
presidential chair, viz., Morgan G. Bulkeley, ex-Governor of
Connecticut; the last W.A. Hulbert; A.G. Mills, the leading spirit of
the great New York Athletic Club, and N.E. Young, the present
highly-esteemed and worthy President of the League. Mr. Bulkeley served
during 1876; Mr. Hulbert from 1876 to his death in 1882; Mr. Mills from
that date up to 1884, when business requirements led to his resignation,
and Mr. Young since then. From the organization of the National League
in 1876 to the day of his death, Mr. Hulbert was the great moving
spirit in the reforms in the government of the professional clubs of the
country, which marked the period from 1876 to the eighties. It was his
influence, largely, which led to the war upon the "crookedness" which
marked the early years of professional base ball history, in which pool
gambling was the potent factor. It took years of cohesive and even
arbitrary legislation to eliminate the poison of the pool rooms from the
professional system, but success was finally achieved, and to the late
President Hulbert and his able coadjutors in the League does the credit
of this success belong. During the League regime, under President Mills,
the great union safety compact, known as the National Agreement, sprang
into existence, and its author--Mr. Mills--at this day has reason to be
proud of the good work he did for professional ball playing, and for the
benefit of the game at large, in the perfecting of this bond of union
between the reputable clubs of the professional fraternity. The wisdom
of the measure, as a protection against the abuses of "revolving" and
"contract breaking," has been very strikingly shown by court decisions
which oblige professional clubs to depend entirely upon base ball law,
and not the common law, for the preservation of their club rights in
contracting with players for their services on the field. Since
Mr. Mills left the League arena he has done most efficient service in
conserving the best interests of the New York Athletic Club and those of
the clubs of the Amateur Athletic Union at large.

The great master of League records, and the whilom Secretary of the
League since its organization, Mr. Young, is known throughout the entire
base ball world, alike for the integrity of his character, the geniality
of his disposition and the marked industry and persevering application
which has characterized the discharge of his onerous official duties.

It is well known that "Old Nick" is frequently alluded to in daily life
as the arch-fiend of the world; but the Old Nick of the base ball arena
presents a character the very opposite in every respect of his devilish
namesake--the one being the spirit of evil, and the other the spirit of
honor and good nature. Long may he live to honor the position and
uphold the reformation in the base ball world which his predecessors so
creditably originated and supported.

Mr. Young is a native of Amsterdam, N.Y. He was but a mere boy at the
outbreak of the war between the States, but he was game to the core and
among the first from his home country to enlist in the Union
service. Just before the war he appeared as an athletic young fellow
with muscles that would have done credit to one as large again as he
was. He was looked on as the best cricket player in the section of the
country in which he lived, playing frequently on elevens which had
besides himself George and Harry Wright as members. You should hear Nick
relate anecdotes of his career as a cricketer. At the close of the war
Mr. Young made Washington his residence, and securing a position in the
Second Auditor's Department, being an excellent accountant, he has
occupied his position through several administrations. From cricket he
became interested in the national game of base ball, and eventually, in
connection with Mr. A.G. Mills, he started the old Olympic club of
Washington, and then it was that he took the field again. In 1871 he
was elected Secretary of the old "National Association of Base Ball
Players"--not of clubs, but of players--and in 1884, he succeeded Mr.
Mills as President of the National League, which organization succeeded
the National Association, which had become rotten.

[Illustration: CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD.
NOTE. For Specifications see Rules from No. 2 to No. 13.]


       *       *       *       *       *




THE PLAYING RULES
OF
PROFESSIONAL
BASE * BALL * CLUBS


As adopted by the National League and American
Association of Professional Base
Ball Clubs.


THE BALL GROUND.

RULE 1. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient in size to
enable each player to play in his position as required by these Rules.

RULE 2. To lay off the lines governing the positions and play off the
Game known as _Base Ball_, proceed as follows:

From a point, A, within the grounds, project a right line out into the
field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point A, lay off lines BC and BD
at right angles to the line AB; then with B as centre and 63.63945 feet
as radius, describe arcs cutting the lines BA at F and BC at G; BD at H
; and BE at I. Draw lines FG, GE, EH and HF, and said lines will be the
containing lines of the Diamond or Infield.

THE CATCHER'S LINES.

RULE 3. With F as centre and 90 feet radius, an arc cutting line FA at
L, and draw lines LM and LO at right angles to FA; and continue same out
from FA not less than 90 feet.

THE FOUL LINE.

RULE 4. From the intersection point, F, continue the straight lines FG
and FH until they intersect with the lines LM and LI, and then from the
points G and H in the opposite direction until they reach the boundary
lines of the grounds.

THE PLAYERS' LINES.

RULE 5. With F as centre and 50 feet radius, describe arcs cutting lines
FO and EM at P and Q, then with F as centre again and 75 feet radius
describe arcs cutting FG and FH at R and S; then from the points P Q R
and S draw lines at right angles to the lines FO, FM, FG, and FH, and
continue same until they intersect at the points T W and W.

THE CAPTAIN AND COACHERS' LINE.

RULE 6. With R and S as centres and 15 feet radius, describe arcs
cutting lines RW and ST at X and Y, and from the points X and Y draw
lines parallel with lines FH and FG, and continue same out to the
boundary lines of the ground.

THE THREE FOOT LINE.

RULE 7. With F as centre and 45 feet radius, describe an arc cutting
line FG at 1, and from 1 out to the distance of 3 feet draw a line at
right angles to FG, and marked point 2; then from point 2, draw a line
parallel with the line FG to a point 3 feet beyond the point G, and
marked 3; then from the point 3 draw a line at right angles to line 2,
3, back to and intersecting with line FG, and from thence back along
line GF to point 1.

THE PITCHER'S PLATE.

RULE 8. With point F as centre and 60.5 feet as radius, describe an arc
cutting the line FB at a point 4, and draw a line 5, 6, passing through
point 4 and extending 12 inches on either side of line FB; then with
line 5, 6, as a side, describe a parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches.

THE BASES.

RULE 9. Within the angle F, describe a square the sides of which shall
be 12 inches, two of its sides lying upon the lines FG and FH, and
within the angles G and H describe squares the side of which shall be 15
inches, the two outer sides of said square lying upon the lines FG and
GI and FH and HI, and at the angle E describe a square whose side shall
be 15 inches and so described that its sides shall be parallel with GI
and IH and its centre immediately over the angular point E.

THE BATSMAN'S LINE.

RULE 10. On either side of the line AFB describe two parallelograms 6
feet long and 4 feet wide (marked 8 and 9), their length being parallel
with the line AFB, their distance apart being 6 inches, added to each
end of the length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F, and
the centre of their length being upon said diagonal.

RULE 11. The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's Plate at 4 must be of
whitened rubber and so fixed in the ground as to be even with the
surface.

RULE 12. The First Base at G, the Second Base at E, and the Third Base
at H, must be of white canvas bags, filled with soft material, and
securely fastened in their positions described in Rule 9.

RULE 13. The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 10 must be
marked with lime, chalk, or other suitable material, so as to be
distinctly seen by the Umpire.


THE BALL.

RULE 14. The Ball.[A] [Footnote A: The Spalding League Ball has been
adopted by the National League for the past sixteen years, and is used
in all League contests.

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under 16 years of age) we
recommend them to use the Spalding Boys' League Ball, and that games
played by junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same
as if played with the Official League Ball.]

SECTION 1. Must not weigh less than five nor more than five and
one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less than nine nor more
than nine and one-quarter inches in circumference. The Spalding League
Ball, or the Reach American Association Ball, must be used in all games
played under these rules.

SECTION. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be furnished by
the Home Club to the Umpire for use. When the ball in play is batted to
foul ground, out of sight of the Umpire, the other ball shall be
immediately brought into play. As often as one of the two in use shall
be lost a new one must be substituted, so that the Umpire shall at all
times after the game begins have two balls for use. The moment the
Umpire delivers an alternate ball to the pitcher it comes into play, and
shall not be exchanged until it, in turn, passes out of sight to foul
ground.

SECTION. 3. In all games the ball or balls played with shall be
furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play becomes the
property of the winning club. Each ball to be used in championship games
shall be examined, measured and weighed by the Secretary of the
Association, inclosed in a paper box and sealed with the seal of the
Secretary, which seal shall not be broken except by the Umpire in the
presence of the Captains of the two contesting nines after play has been
called.

SECTION. 4. Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or ripped so as
to expose the interior, or in any way so injured as to be, in the
opinion of the Umpire, unfit for fair use, he shall, upon appeal by
either Captain, at once put the alternate ball into play and call for a
new one.


THE BAT.

RULE 15. The Bat.

Must be made entirely of hard wood, except that the handle may be wound
with twine, or a granulated substance applied, not to exceed eighteen
inches from the end.

It must be round, not exceed two and three-quarter inches in diameter in
the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two inches in length.


THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS.

RULE 16. The players of each club in a game shall be nine in number, one
of whom shall act as Captain, and in no case shall less than nine men be
allowed to play on each side.

RULE 17. The players' positions shall be such as may be assigned them by
their Captain, except that the pitcher must take the position as defined
in Rules 8 and 29.

RULE 18. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to occupy seats among
the spectators.

RULE 19. SECTION 1. Every club shall adopt uniforms for its players, but
no player shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his shoes other
than the ordinary base ball shoe plate.

SECTION. 2. The catcher and first baseman are permitted to wear a glove
or mitt of any size, shape or weight. All other players are restricted
to the use of a glove or mitt weighing not over ten ounces, and
measuring in circumference around the palm of the hand not over fourteen
inches.


PLAYERS' BENCHES.

RULE 20. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the Home Club, and
placed upon a portion of the ground outside of, and not nearer than
twenty-five feet to, the players' lines. One such bench must be for the
exclusive use of the visiting club, and one for the exclusive use of the
home club, and the players of the competing teams shall be required to
occupy their respective benches while not engaged in active play.


THE GAME.

RULE 21. SECTION 1. Every Championship game must be commenced not later
than two hours before sunset.

SECTION. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each contesting
nine, except that

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings than the
other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall then terminate.

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings scores the winning run
before the third man is out, the game shall terminate.

A TIE GAME.

RULE 22. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings, play shall be
continued until one side has scored more runs than the other in an equal
number of innings, provided that if the side last at bat scores the
winning run before the third man is out the game shall terminate. A DRAWN
GAME.

RULE 23. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the Umpire when he terminates
a game on account of darkness or rain, after five equal innings have
been played, if the score at the time is equal on the last even innings
played; but (exception) if the side that went second to bat is then at
the bat, and has scored the same number of runs as the other side, the
Umpire shall declare the game drawn without regard to the score of the
last equal innings.

A CALLED GAME.

RULE 24. If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of darkness or rain at
any time after five innings have been completed, the score shall be that
of the last equal innings played, unless the side second at bat shall
have scored one or more runs than the side first at bat, in which case
the score of the game shall be the total number of runs made.

A FORFEITED GAME.

RULE 25. A forfeited game shall be declared by the Umpire in favor of
the club not in fault, at the request of such club, in the following
cases:

SECTION 1. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon a field, or being
upon the field, fail to begin the game within five minutes after the
Umpire has called "Play," at the hour appointed for the beginning of the
game, unless such delay in appearing or in commencing the game be
unavoidable.

SECTION. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or fails to
continue playing, unless such game has been suspended or terminated by
the Umpire.

SECTION. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, one side
fails to resume playing within _one minute_ after the Umpire has called
"Play."

SECTION. 4. If a team resorts to dilatory practice to delay the game.

SECTION. 5. If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one of these rules is
willfully violated.

SECTION. 6. If, after ordering the removal of a player as authorized by
Rule 59, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed within one minute.

SECTION. 7. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, he shall
transmit a written notice thereof to the President of the Association
within twenty-four hours thereafter.

NO GAME.

RULE 26. "No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire if he shall terminate
play on account of rain or darkness, before five innings on each side
are completed, except in a case when the game is called, and the club
second at bat shall have more runs at the end of its fourth innings than
the club first at bat has made in its five innings, then the Umpire
shall award the game to the club having made the greatest number of
runs, and it shall be a game and be so counted in the Championship
record.


SUBSTITUTES.

RULE 27. SECTION 1. In every championship game each team shall be
required to have present on the field, in uniform, one or more
substitute players.

SECTION. 2. Any such player may be substituted at any time by either
club, but no player thereby retired shall thereafter participate in the
game.

SECTION. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run for him
except by consent of the Captains of the contesting teams.


CHOICE OF INNINGS--CONDITION OF GROUND.

RULE 28. The choice of innings shall be given to the Captain of the Home
Club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness of the ground for
beginning a game after rain.


THE PITCHER'S POSITION.

RULE 29. The Pitcher shall take his position facing the Batsman
with both feet square on the ground, and in front of the Pitcher's
plate, but in the act of delivering the ball one foot must be in contact
with the pitcher's plate, defined in Rule 8. He shall not raise either
foot, unless in the act of delivering the ball, nor make more than one
step in such delivery. He shall hold the ball, before the delivery,
fairly in front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire. When the
Pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume the above
position and pause momentarily before delivering the ball to the bat.


THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL--FAIR AND UNFAIR BALLS.

RULE 30. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher while standing
in his position, and facing the Batsman, the ball so delivered to pass
over the Home Base, not lower than the Batsman's knee, nor higher than
his shoulder.

RULE 31. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, as in Rule
30, except that the ball does not pass over the Home Base, or does pass
over the Home Base above the Batsman's shoulder or below the knee.


BALKING.

RULE 32. A Balk shall be:

SECTION 1. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver the ball to the bat
without delivering it.

SECTION. 2. The holding of the ball by the Pitcher so long as to delay
the game unnecessarily.

SECTION. 3. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by the Pitcher
while not in the position defined in Rule 29.


DEAD BALLS.

RULE 33. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the Pitcher that
touches any part of the Batsman's person or clothing while standing in
his position without being struck at; or any part of the Umpire's person
or clothing, while on foul ground, without first passing the Catcher.

RULE 34. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not legally caught out,
Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for being struck by a fair hit ball,
the ball shall not be considered in play until it is held by the Pitcher
standing in his position, and the Umpire shall have called play.


BLOCK BALLS.

RULE 35. SECTION 1. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is touched,
stopped or handled by any person not engaged in the game.

SECTION. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall declare it, and
Base Runners may run the bases without being put out until the ball has
been returned to and held by the pitcher standing in his position.

SECTION. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged in the
game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick it beyond
the reach of the Fielders, the Umpire should call "Time," and require
each Base Runner to stop at the last base touched by him until the ball
be returned to the pitcher standing in his position, and the Umpire
shall have called play.


THE BATSMAN'S POSITION--ORDER OF BATTING.

RULE 36. The Batsmen must take their positions within the Batsmen's
Lines, as defined in Rule 10, in the order in which they are named in
the batting order, which batting order must be submitted by the Captains
of the opposing teams to the Umpire before the game, and this batting
order must be followed except in the case of a substitute player, in
which case the substitute must take the place of the original player in
the batting order. After the first inning the first striker in each
inning shall be the batsman whose name follows that of the last man who
has completed his turn--time at bat--in the preceding inning.

RULE 37. SECTION 1. When their side goes to the bat the players must
immediately return to the players' bench, as defined in Rule 20, and
remain there until the side is put out, except when batsmen or base
runners; provided, that the Captain and one assistant only may occupy
the space between the Players' Lines and the Captain's Lines, to coach
base runners.

SECTION. 2. No player of the side "at bat," except when batsman, shall
occupy any portion of the space within the Catcher's Lines, as defined
in Rule 3. The triangular space behind the Home Base is reserved for the
exclusive use of Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must
prohibit any player of the side "at bat" from crossing the same at any
time while the ball is in the hands of, or passing between the Pitcher
and Catcher, while standing in their positions.

SECTION. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the portion of
the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any portion thereof
that may be in the way of the ball, or any Fielder attempting to catch
or field it.


THE BATTING RULES.

RULE 38. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, standing in his
position, that first touches any part of the person of a player or
umpire or falls within the foul lines, that (whether it first touches
Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home
and First, or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a player.

RULE 39. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, standing in his
position, that first touches the ground, any part of the person of a
player, or any object behind either of the Foul Lines, or that strikes
the person of such Batsman, while standing in his position, or batted by
the Batsman, standing in his position, that (whether it first touches
Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls outside the Foul Lines, between
Home and First or Home and Third Bases, without interference by a
player: _Provided_, that a Foul Hit ball not rising above the Batsman's
head, and caught by the Catcher playing within ten feet of the Home
Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip.

RULE 40. A bunt hit is a deliberate attempt on the part of the Batsman
to hit a ball slowly within the infield so that it cannot be fielded by
any infielder in time to retire the batsman.


BALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS.

RULE 41. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the Umpire shall
decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul should it disappear
outside of, the range of the Foul Lines, and Rules 38 and 39 are to be
construed accordingly.

RULE 42. A Fair batted ball that goes over the fence shall entitle the
batsman to a home run, except that should it go over the fence at a less
distance than two hundred and thirty-five feet from the Home Base, when
he shall be entitled to two bases only, and a distinctive line shall be
marked on the fence at this point.


STRIKES.

RULE 43. A strike is:

SECTION 1. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its touching his bat;
or

SECTION. 2. A Fair Ball legally delivered by the Pitcher, but not struck
at by the Batsman.

SECTION. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a Foul Hit.

SECTION. 4. A Foul Hit, other than a Foul Tip, made by the Batsman while
attempting a bunt hit, as defined in Rule 40, that falls or rolls upon
foul ground between Home Base and First Base or Home Base and Third
Base.

SECTION. 5. A ball struck at, if the ball touches any part of the
Batsman's person.

SECTION. 6. A ball tipped by the Batsman and caught by the catcher
within the 10-foot lines.

RULE 44. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman when any part of
his person is upon ground outside the lines of the Batsman's position.


THE BATSMAN IS OUT.

RULE 45. The Batsman is out:

SECTION 1. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his order of
batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper Batsman takes his
position before a time "at bat" recorded; and in such case the balls and
strikes called must be counted in the time "at bat" of the proper
Batsman, and only the proper Batsman shall be declared out: _Provided_,
this rule shall not take effect unless _the out_ is declared before the
ball is delivered to the succeeding Batsman, and no runs shall be scored
or bases run, and further, no outs shall be counted other than that of
the proper Batsman.

SECTION. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute after the
Umpire has called for the Batsman.

SECTION. 3. If he makes a Foul Hit other than a Foul Tip, as defined in
Rule 39, and the ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before touching
the ground, provided it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or
touch some object other than a Fielder, before being caught.

SECTION. 4. If he makes a Foul Strike.

SECTION. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding or
throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of his position, or
otherwise obstructing or interfering with the player.

SECTION. 6. If, while the First Base be occupied by a base runner, three
strikes be called on him by the Umpire, except when two men are already
out.

SECTION. 7. If, after two strikes have been called, the Batsman
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Rule 43, Section 3.

SECTION. 8. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touches any
part of the Batsman's person, in which case base runners occupying bases
shall return, as prescribed in Rule 49, Section 5.

SECTION. 9. If he hits a fly ball that can be handled by an infielder
while first and second bases are occupied, or first, second and third,
with only one out.

SECTION. 10. If the third strike is called in accordance with Section 4,
Rule 43, in such case the Umpire shall, as soon as the ball is hit,
declare infield or outfield hit.



BASE RUNNING RULES.


WHEN THE BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER.

RULE 46. The Batsman becomes a Base Runner:

SECTION 1. Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit.

SECTION. 2. Instantly after four balls have been called by the Umpire.

SECTION. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been decided by the
Umpire.

SECTION. 4. If, while he be a Batsman, without making any attempt to
strike, his person--excepting hands or forearm, which makes it a dead
ball--or clothing be hit by a ball from the Pitcher; unless, in the
opinion of the Umpire, he intentionally permits himself to be so hit.

SECTION. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the
Pitcher.


BASES TO BE TOUCHED.

RULE 47. The Base Runner must touch each base in regular order, viz.,
First, Second, Third and Home Bases, and when obliged to return (except
on a foul hit) must retouch the base or bases in reverse order. He shall
only be considered as holding a base after touching it, and shall then
be entitled to hold such base until he has legally touched the next base
in order, or has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding Base
Runner.


ENTITLED TO BASES.

RULE 48. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without being put out, to
take the base in the following cases:

SECTION 1. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called four balls.

SECTION. 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding batsman a base on four
balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal
delivery--as in Rule 46, Section 5--and the Base Runner is thereby
forced to vacate the base held by him.

SECTION. 3. If the Umpire calls a "balk."  SECTION. 4. If a ball,
delivered by the Pitcher, pass the Catcher and touch the Umpire, or any
fence or building within ninety feet of the Home Base.

SECTION. 5. If, upon a fair hit, the ball strikes the person or clothing
of the Umpire on fair ground.

SECTION. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the obstruction of
an adversary.

SECTION. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat or
any part of his dress.


RETURNING TO BASES.

RULE 49. The Base Runner shall return to his base, and shall be entitled
to so return without being put out:

SECTION 1. If the Umpire declares a Foul Tip (as defined in Rule 39), or
any other Foul Hit not legally caught by a fielder.

SECTION. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike.

SECTION. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be also the
fourth Unfair Ball and he be thereby forced to take the next base, as
provided in Rule 48, Section 2.

SECTION. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire interferes with the
Catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the Catcher to intercept a
Base Runner.

SECTION. 5. The Base Runner shall return to his base, if, while
attempting a strike, the ball touches any part of the Batsman's person.


WHEN BASE RUNNERS ARE OUT.

RULE 50. The Base Runner is out:

SECTION 1. If, after three strikes have been declared against him while
Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch the third strike ball, he plainly
attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball.

SECTION. 2. If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such fair hit ball
be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touching the ground, or any
object other than a Fielder: _Provided_, it be not, caught in a
Fielder's hat or cap.

SECTION. 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes on him, while
Batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held by a Fielder before
touching the ground: _Provided_, it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or
cap, or touch some object other than a Fielder, before being caught.

SECTION. 4. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be touched with
the ball in the hand of a Fielder _before_ he shall have touched First
Base.

SECTION. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be securely
held by a Fielder, while touching First Base with any part of his
person, _before_ such Base Runner touches First Base.

SECTION. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from Home Base
to First Base, while the ball is being fielded to First Base, he runs
outside the three-foot lines, as defined in Rule 7, unless to avoid a
Fielder attempting to field a Batted Ball.

SECTION. 7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from Second to
Third Base, or from Third to Home Base, he runs more than three feet
from a direct line between such bases, to avoid being touched by the
ball in the hands of a Fielder; but in case a Fielder be occupying the
Base Runner's proper path, in attempting to field a batted ball, then
the Base Runner shall run out of the path, and behind said Fielder, and
shall not be declared out for so doing.

SECTION. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a batted
ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 of this Rule; or if he
in any way obstructs a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball, or
intentionally interferes with a thrown ball: _Provided_, that if two or
more Fielders attempt to field a batted ball, and the Base Runner comes
in contact with one or more of them, the Umpire shall determine which
Fielder is entitled to the benefit of this rule, and shall not decide
the Base Runner out for coming in contact with any other fielder.

SECTION. 9. If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be touched by
the ball in the hands of a Fielder, unless some part of his person is
touching a base he is entitled to occupy: _Provided_, the ball be held
by the Fielder after touching him; but (exception as to First Base), in
running to First Base he may overrun said base, without being put out
for being off said base, after first touching it, provided he returns at
once and retouches the base, after which he may be put out as at any
other base. If, in overrunning First Base, he also attempts to run to
Second Base, or, after passing the base he turns to his left from the
foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being put out.

SECTION. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball (other than a foul tip as
referred to in Rule 39) is legally caught by a Fielder, such ball is
legally held by a Fielder on the base occupied by the Base Runner when
such ball was struck (or the Base Runner be touches with the ball in the
hands of a Fielder), before he retouches said base after such Fair or
Foul Hit ball was so caught: _Provided_, that the Base Runner shall not
be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it
be delivered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on
said base, or touches the Base Runner with it; but if the Base Runner in
attempting to reach a base, detaches it before being touched or forced
out, he shall be declared safe.

SECTION. 11. If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, the First Base,
or the First and Second Bases, or the First, Second and Third Bases, be
occupied, any Base Runner so occupying a base shall cease to be entitled
to hold it, until any following Base Runner is put out, and may be put
out at the next base or by being touched by the ball in the hands of a
Fielder in the same manner as in running to First Base, at any time
before any following Base Runner is put out.

SECTION. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him _before touching the
Fielder_, and in such case no base shall be run unless forced by the
Batsman becoming a base runner, and no run shall be scored; or any other
Base Runner put out.

SECTION. 13. If, when running to a base or forced to return to a base,
he fail to touch the intervening base or bases, if any, in the order
prescribed in Rule 47, he may be put out at the base he fails to touch,
or being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, in the same
manner as in running to First Base; _Provided_, that the Base Runner
shall not be out in such case if the ball be delivered to the bat by the
Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on said base or touches the Base
Runner with it.

SECTION. 14. If, when the Umpire calls "Play," after any suspension of a
game, he fails to return to and touch the base he occupied when "Time"
was called before touching the next base: _Provided_, the Base Runner
shall not be out in such case if the ball be delivered to the bat by the
Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on said base or touches the Base
Runner with it.


WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER IS OUT.

RULE 51. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base Runner out,
without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all cases where such
player is put out in accordance with these rules, except as provided in
Rule 50, Sections 10 and 14.


COACHING RULES.

RULE 52. The coachers shall be restricted to coaching the Base Runner
only, and shall not be allowed to address any remarks except to the Base
Runner, and then only in words of necessary direction; and shall not use
language which will in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of
the opposing club, the Umpire or the spectators, and not more than two
coachers, who may be one player participating in the game and, any other
player under contract to it, in the uniform of either club, shall be
allowed at any one time. To enforce the above, the Captain of the
opposite side may call the attention of the Umpire to the offence, and
upon a repetition of the same, the offending player shall be debarred
from further participation in the game and shall leave the playing field
forthwith.


THE SCORING OF RUNS.

RULE 53. One run shall be scored every time a Base Runner, after having
legally touched the first three bases, shall touch the Home Base before
three men are put out by (exception). If the third man is forced out, or
is put out before reaching First Base, a run shall not be scored.

THE UMPIRE.

RULE 54. The Umpire shall not be changed during the progress of a game,
except for reason of illness or injury.


HIS POWERS AND JURISDICTION.

RULE 55. SECTION 1. The Umpire is master of the Field from the
commencement to the termination of the game, and is entitled to the
respect of the spectators, and any person offering any insult or
indignity to him must be promptly ejected from the grounds.

SECTION. 2. He must be invariably addressed by the players as
Mr. Umpire; and he must compel the players to observe the provisions of
all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby invested with authority to order
any player to do or omit to do any act as he may deem necessary, to give
force and effect to any and all such provisions.


SPECIAL DUTIES.

RULE 56. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows:

SECTION 1. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge of play. In no
instance shall any person, except the Captain of the competing teams, be
allowed to address him or question his decisions, and they can only
question him on an interpretation of the Rules. No Manager or any other
officer of either club shall be permitted to go on the field or address
the Umpire, under a penalty of a forfeiture of a game.

SECTION. 2. Before the commencement of a Game, the Umpire shall see that
the rules governing all the materials of the Game are strictly
observed. He shall ask the Captain of the Home Club whether there are
any special ground rules to be enforced, and if there are, he shall see
that they are duly enforced, provided they do not conflict with any of
these rules.

SECTION. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines playing constantly
from the commencement of the game to its termination, allowing such
delays only as are rendered unavoidable by accident, injury or rain. He
must, until the completion of the game, require the players of each side
to promptly take their positions in the field as soon as the third man
is put out, and must require the first striker of the opposite side to
be in his position at the bat as soon as the fielders are in their
places.

SECTION. 4. The Umpire shall count and call every "Unfair Ball"
delivered by the Pitcher, and every "Dead Ball," if also an unfair ball,
as a "Ball," and he shall count and call every "Strike." Neither a
"Ball" nor a "Strike" shall be counted or called until the ball has
passed the Home Base. He shall also declare every "Dead Ball," "Block,"
"Foul Hit," "Foul Strike," and "Balk," "Infield" or "Outfield Hit," as
prescribed in Rule 45, Section 9.

CALLING "PLAY" AND "TIME."

RULE 57. The Umpire must call "Play" promptly at the hour designated by
the Home Club, and on the call of "Play" the game must immediately
begin. When he calls "Time" play shall be suspended until he calls
"Play" again, and during the interim no player shall be put out, base be
run or run be scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only for an accident
to himself or a player (but in case of accident to a Fielder "Time"
shall not be called until the ball be returned to and held by the
Pitcher, standing in his position), or in case rain falls so heavily
that the spectators are compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek
shelter, in which case he shall note the time of suspension, and should
such rain continue to fall thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate
the game; or to enforce order in case of annoyance from spectators.

RULE 58. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to call "Time" in
case of an accident to himself or a player, a "Block" as referred to in
Rule 35, Section 3, or in case of rain, as defined by the rule.


INFLICTING FINES.

RULE 59. The Umpire is empowered to inflict lines of not less than
$25.00, nor more than $100.00, for the first offence, on players during
the progress of a game, as follows:

SECTION 1. For vulgar, indecent or other improper conduct or language.

SECTION. 2. For the Captain or Coacher willfully failing to remain
within the legal bounds of his position, except upon an appeal by the
captain from the Umpire's decision upon a misinterpretation of the
rules.

SECTION. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of his orders,
or for any other violation of these rules.

SECTION. 4. Immediately upon notification by the Umpire that a fine has
been imposed upon any Manager, Captain or player, the Secretary shall
forthwith notify the person so fined, and also the club of which he is a
member, and in the event of the failure of the person so fined to pay to
the Secretary the amount of said fine within five days of notice, he
shall be debarred from participation in any championship game until such
fine is paid.

SECTION. 5. The Umpire may remove a player from the playing field for a
violation of Section 1 of this rule, in addition to a fine, but under no
circumstances shall he remove a player for a violation of Section 2 of
this Rule, unless upon a repetition of the offence prescribed therein.


FIELD RULES.

RULE 66. No club shall allow open betting or pool-selling upon its
ground, nor in any building owned or occupied by it.

RULE 61. No person shall be allowed upon any part of the field during
the progress of the game in addition to the players in uniform, the
Manager on each side and the Umpire; except such officers of the law as
may be present in uniform, and such officials of the Home Club as may be
necessary to preserve the peace.

RULE 62. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or player shall address the
spectators during the progress of a game, except in case of necessary
explanation.

RULE 63. Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force upon its own
grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a crowd entering the
field during the progress of a game, and interfering with the play in
any manner, the Visiting Club may refuse to play further until the field
be cleared. If the ground be not cleared within fifteen minutes
thereafter, the Visiting Club may claim, and shall be entitled to, the
game by a score of nine runs to none (no matter what number of innings
have been played).


GENERAL DEFINITIONS.

RULE 64. "Play" is the order of the Umpire to begin the game, or to
resume play after its suspension.

RULE 65. "Time" is the order of the Umpire to suspend play. Such
suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game.

RULE 66. "Game" is the announcement by the Umpire that the game is
terminated.

RULE 67. An "Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players representing
a Club in a game, and is completed when three of such players have been
put out, as provided in these rules.

RULE 68. A "Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Batsman. It begins
when he takes his position, and continues until he is put out or becomes
a base runner; except when, because of being hit by a pitched ball, or
in case of an illegal delivery by the Pitcher, or in case of a sacrifice
hit purposely made to the infield which, not being a base hit, advances
a base runner without resulting in a put out, except to the Batsman, as
in Rule 45.

RULE 69. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required by these Rules.


SCORING.

RULE 70. In order to promote uniformity in scoring championship games
the following instructions, suggestions and definitions are made for the
benefit of scorers, and they are required to make all scores in
accordance therewith.


BATTING.

SECTION 1. The first item in the tabulated score, after the player's
name and position, shall be the number of times he has been at bat
during game. The time or times when the player has been sent to base by
being hit by a pitched ball, by the Pitcher's illegal delivery, or by a
base on balls, shall not be included in this column.

SECTION. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs made by
each player.

SECTION. 3. In the third column should be placed the first base hits
made by each player. A base hit should be scored in the following cases:

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the foul lines, and
out of reach of the Fielders.

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a Fielder in motion,
but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle the ball before
the striker reaches First Base.

When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he cannot handle
it in time to put out the Batsman. In case of doubt over this class of
hits, score a base hit, and exempt the Fielder from the charge of an
error.

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a Fielder that he cannot handle it
in time to put out the Batsman.

That in all cases where a Base Runner is retired by being hit by a
batted ball, the Batsman should be credited with a base hit.

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the Umpire, as defined
in Rule 48, Section 5.

SECTION. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice Hits, which
shall be credited to the Batsman, who, when no one is out, or when but
one man is out, advances a Runner a base by a bunt sacrifice hit, which
results in putting out the Batsman, or would so result if the ball were
handled without error.


FIELDING.

SECTION. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player shall be set
down in the fifth column. Where a Batsman is given out by the Umpire for
a foul strike, or where the Batsman fails to bat in proper order, the
put out shall be scored to the Catcher.

SECTION. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set down in
the sixth column. An assist should be given to each player who handles
the ball in assisting a run out or other play of the kind.

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in time to put a
Runner out, even if the player who could complete the play fails,
through no fault of the player assisting.

And generally an assist should be given to each player who handles or
assists in any manner in handling the ball from the time it leaves the
bat until it reaches the player who makes the put out, or in case of a
thrown ball, to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, and in
such a way that a put out results, or would result if no error were made
by the receiver.

ERRORS.

SECTION. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column for each
misplay which allows the striker or base runner to make one or more
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put out, except
that "wild pitches," "base on balls," bases on the Batsman being struck
by a "pitched ball," or in case of illegal pitched balls, balks and
passed balls, shall not be included in said column. In scoring errors of
batted balls see Section 3 of this Rule.

SECTION. 8. Stolen Bases shall be scored as follows:

Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the Base Runner,
whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the fielder, but any
manifest error is to be charged to the fielder making the same. If the
Base Runner advances another base he shall not be credited with a stolen
base, and the fielder allowing the advancement is also to be charged
with an error. If the Base Runner makes a start and a battery error is
made, the runner secures the credit of a stolen base, and the battery
error is scored against the player making it. Should a Base Runner
overrun a base and then be put out, he shall receive the credit for the
stolen base. If a Base Runner advances a base on a fly out, or gains two
bases on a single base hit, or an infield out, or attempted out, he
shall be credited with a stolen base, provided there is a possible
chance and a palpable attempt made to retire him.


EARNED RUNS.

SECTION. 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the player reaches
the home base unaided by errors before chances have been offered to
retire the side.


THE SUMMARY.

RULE 71. The Summary shall contain:

SECTION 1. The number of earned runs made by each side.

SECTION. 2. The number of two-base hits made by each player.

SECTION. 3. The number of three-base hits made by each player.

SECTION. 4. The number of home runs made by each player.

SECTION. 5. The number of bases stolen by each player.

SECTION. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by each side, and
the names of the players assisting in the same.

SECTION. 7. The number of men given bases on called balls by each
Pitcher.

SECTION. 8. The number of men given bases from being hit by pitched
balls.

SECTION. 9. The number of men struck out.

SECTION. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher.

SECTION. 11. The number of wild pitches by each Pitcher.

SECTION. 12. The time of Game.

SECTION. 13. The name of the Umpire.



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS.


                                                    RULE.
The Ground,                                             1
The Field,                                              2
Catcher's Lines,                                        3
Foul Lines,                                             4
Players' Lines,                                         5
The Captain's and Coachers' Lines,                      6
Three-foot Line,                                        7
Pitcher's Plate,                                        8
The Bases,                                              9
Batsman's Lines,                                       10
The Home Base,                                         11
First, Second and Third Bases,                         12
Lines must be Marked,                                  13
The Ball,                                              14
   Weight and Size,                               (1)  14
   Number Balls Furnished,                        (2)  14
   Furnished by Home Club,                        (3)  14
   Replaced if Injured,                           (4)  14
The Bat,                                               15
   Material of                                    (1)  15
   Shape of                                       (2)  15


THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS.

Number of Players in Game,                             16
Players' Positions,                                    17
Players not to Sit with Spectators,                    18
Club Uniforms,                                    (1)  19
  Gloves,                                         (2)  19
Players' Benches,                                      20


THE GAME.

Time of Championship Game,                        (1)  21
Number of Innings,                                (2)  21
Termination of Game,                              (a)  21
The Winning Run,                                  (b)  21
A Tie Game,                                            22
A Drawn Game,                                          23
A Called Game,                                         24
A Forfeited Game,                                      25
  Failure of the Nine to Appear,                  (1)  25
  Refusal of One Side to Play,                    (2)  25
  Failure to Resume Playing,                      (3)  25
  If a Team Resorts to Dilatory Practice,         (4)  25
  Wilful Violation,                               (5)  25
  Disobeying Order to Remove Player,              (6)  25
  Written Notice to President,                    (7)  25
No Game,                                               26
Substitutes,                                           27

                                                    RULE.
  One or more substitute players,                 (1)  27
  Extra Player,                                   (2)  27
  Base Runner,                                    (3)  27
Choice of Innings--Condition of Grounds,               28
The Pitcher's Position,                                29
Delivery of the Ball--Fair Ball,                       30
Unfair Ball,                                           31
Balking,                                               32
  Motion to Deceive,                              (1)  32
  Delay by Holding,                               (2)  32
  Pitcher Outside of Lines,                       (3)  32
A Dead Ball,                                           33
A Foul Strike,                                         34
Block Balls,                                           35
  Stopped by Person not in Game,                  (1)  35
  Ball Returned,                                  (2)  35
  Base Runner must Stop,                          (3)  35
The Batsman's Position--Order of Batting,              36
  Where Players must Remain,                      (1)  37
  Space Reserved for Umpire,                      (2)  37
  Space Allotted Players "at Bat,"                (3)  37
Batting Rules--Fair Hit,                               38
Foul Hit,                                              39
Bunt Hit,                                              40
Batted Ball Outside Grounds,                           41
A Fair Batted Ball,                                    42
Strikes,                                               43
  Ball Struck at by Batsman,                      (1)  43
  Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher,                 (2)  43
  Attempt to Make Foul Hit,                       (3)  43
  Foul Hit while Attempting a Bunt Hit,           (4)  43
  Ball Struck at after Touching Batsman's Person, (5)  43
  Ball Tipped by Batsman,                         (6)  43
A Foul Strike,                                         44
The Batsman is Out,                                    45
  Failing to Take Position at Bat in Order,       (1)  45
  Failure to Take Position within One Minute after
    being called,                                 (2)  45
  If He Makes a Foul Hit,                         (3)  45
  If He Makes a Foul Strike,                      (4)  45
  Attempt to Hinder Catcher,                      (5)  45
  Three Strikes Called by Umpire,                 (6)  45
  Attempt to Make a Foul Hit After Two Strikes
    have been Called,                             (7)  45
  If Ball Hits Him While Making Third Strike,     (8)  45
  If He Hits a Fly Ball that can be Handled by
    Infielder while First Base Occupied with Only
    One Out,                                      (9)  45
  If Third Strike is Called,                     (10)  45


BASE RUNNING RULES.
                                                     RULE.
The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner,                     46
  After a Fair Hit,                               (1)  46
  After Four Balls are Called,                    (2)  46
  After Three Strikes are Declared,               (3)  46
  If Hit by Ball While at Bat,                    (4)  46
  After Illegal Delivery of Ball,                 (5)  46
Bases to be Touched,                                   47
Entitled to Bases,                                     48
  If Umpire Call Four Balls,                      (1)  48
  If Umpire Award Succeeding Batsman Base,        (2)  48
  If Umpire Calls Balk,                           (3)  48
  If Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher,               (4)  48
  Ball Strikes Umpire,                            (5)  48
  Prevented from Making Base,                     (6)  48
  Fielder Stops Ball,                             (7)  48
Returning to Bases,                                    49
  If Foul Tip,                                    (1)  49
  If Foul Strike,                                 (2)  49
  If Dead Ball,                                   (3)  49

  If Person of Umpire Interferes with Catcher,    (4)  49
  If the Ball Touches the Batsman's Person,       (5)  49
Base Runner Out,                                       50
  Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Ball,   (1)  50
  If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball,                  (2)  50
  Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder,              (3)  50
  Touched with Ball After Three Strikes,          (4)  50
  Touching First Base,                            (5)  50
  Running from Home Base to First Base,           (6)  50
  Running from First to Second Base,              (7)  50
  Failure to Avoid Fielder,                       (8)  50
  Touched by Ball While in Play,                  (9)  50
  Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder,            (10)  50
  Batsman Becomes a Base Runner,                 (11)  50
  Touched by Hit Ball Before Touching Fielder,   (12)  50
  Running to Base,                               (13)  50
  Umpire Calls Play,                             (14)  50
When Batsman or Base Runner is Out,                    51
Coaching Rules,                                        52
Scoring of Runs,                                       53


THE UMPIRE.

The Umpire                                             54
  When Master of the Field,                       (1)  55
  Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules,        (2)  55
Special Duties,                                        56
  Is Sole Judge of Play,                          (1)  56
  Shall See Rules Observed before Commencing
    Game,                                         (2)  56

                                                    RULE.
  Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing,             (3)  56
  Must Count and Call Balls,                      (4)  56
Umpire Must Call Play,                                 57
Umpire Allowed to Call Time,                           58
Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines,                  59
  For Indecent Language,                          (1)  59
  Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain within
    Bounds,                                       (2)  59
  Disobedience of a Player,                       (3)  59
  Shall Notify Captain,                           (4)  59
  Repetition of Offences,                         (5)  59


FIELD RULES.

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting,                      60
Who Shall be Allowed in the Field,                     61
Audience Shall Not be Addressed,                       62
Every Club shall Furnish Police Force,                 63


GENERAL DEFINITIONS.

Play,                                                  64
Time,                                                  65
Game,                                                  66
An Inning,                                             67
A Time at Bat,                                         68
Legal,                                                 69
Scoring,                                               70
  Batting,                                        (1)  70
  Runs Made,                                      (2)  70
  Base Hits,                                      (3)  70
  Sacrifice Hits,                                 (4)  70
  Fielding,                                       (5)  70
  Assists,                                        (6)  70
  Errors,                                         (7)  70
  Stolen Bases,                                   (8)  70
  Earned Runs,                                    (9)  70
The Summary,                                           71
  Number of Earned Runs,                          (1)  71
  Number of Two Base Hits,                        (2)  71
  Number of Three Base Hits,                      (3)  71
  Number of Home Runs,                            (4)  71
  Number of Stolen Bases,                         (5)  71
  Number of Double and Triple Plays,              (6)  71
  Bases on Called Balls,                          (7)  71
  Bases From being Hit,                           (8)  71
  Men Struck Out,                                 (9)  71
  Passed Balls,                                  (10)  71
  Wild Pitches,                                  (11)  71
  Time of Game,                                  (12)  71
  Name of Umpire,                                (13)  71


[Illustration: The Famous Red Stockings of 1869.]
[Illustration: Rock Island-Moline. Champions of the Western Assn, '94.]
[Illustration: Sioux City Base Ball Club. Champs of Western League, '94.]
[Illustration: Petersburg Base Ball Club. Champs of Virginia League, '94.]



#Rules Appendix.#

We have very little to comment upon this year in regard to the
amendments made to the playing rules of the game, alike by the special
committee appointed to revise them, or by the committee of the whole who
do the final work of revision. No improvement in this branch of League
legislative work, too, may be looked for until a regular and permanent
committee of rules be appointed, with President Young as its continuous
chairman, aided by the chief of the umpire staff, Harry Wright, and one
member of the League, a member like Mr. Byrne, who has done more since
he has been in the League to really improve the game than any other of
the several members of the rules committee since 1891. Moreover, the
report sent in by this proposed permanent committee of rules should not
be changed by the committee of the whole at the spring meetings except
by a two-thirds vote. As it is now, the whole business would likely be
spoiled by the final revision made by a simple majority vote.

The changes made by the committee of 1894, in several instances did not
improve the game at all. The amendment made to the bat rule, which
removed the restrictions as to size, was absurd. The League did well to
throw it out. The gain in the diameter of the bat, though small, will
have its effect on the batting. A quarter of an inch is not much, but it
will tell. The abolition of the "mitt," except for catchers and first
basemen, was a good move, as was the introduction of a penalty for the
failure of umpires to prevent "kicking."  One change introduces a new
experiment, and that is the call of a strike on every foul tip caught on
the fly. The calls of strikes will be more numerous than ever, viz., the
regular strikes, the strikes on foul bunts and on foul tips.

As to the change made in the pitcher's plate, nothing was gained by it.
The pitcher will still violate the rule requiring him to have his foot
in contact with the rubber plate, as he did last year. He cannot get a
firm foothold by placing his foot on the rubber. What was wanted was a
hollow, oblong square, 12x36 inches, in which the pitcher could have
obtained a good, firm foothold within the box, and not as now, outside
of it, as he now has to, to secure a good standpoint for his pivot foot
outside of the box.

Not a single change was made in the badly-worded scoring rules, and in
consequence the same old premium for record batting is offered to every
"fungo" hitter in the ranks. Each member of the committee still walks in
the same old rut in this respect.

One of the best changes was the following: Rule 59 reads now so that
players using "vulgar, indecent, or other improper language" shall be
fined $25 and $100, instead of $5 and $25. In Rule 59, Section 4 was
stricken out and the following substituted: "Upon notification from an
umpire that a fine has been imposed upon any manager, captain or player,
the secretary shall forthwith notify the person so fined, and also the
club of which he is a member, and in the event of the failure of the
person so fined to pay the amount within five days, he shall be debarred
from participating in any championship game until such fine is paid."

The committee still retained that problem in mathematics contained in
the first rule, a description of how to lay out a field which would
puzzle a Yale quarterback.

The change made in Rule 45, Section 1, is a good one. Only the batsman
who has failed to bat in his proper turn can be declared out, not those
who have batted out of turn in consequence of the former's error.

It will now cost a kicker $25 at least, for indulging in his "hustling"
tactics.

That was a much-needed resolution adopted by the League forbidding any
club from paying a single fine inflicted on a player.



NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION SCHEDULE.


SEASON OF 1895.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
CLUBS.       In           In             In              In
             Boston.      Brooklyn.      New York.       Philadelphia.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Boston                    July           Apr.            June 29
                          3, 4, 4        24, 25, 26      July 1, 2
                          Sept.          Sept.           Aug.
                          23, 24, 25     11, 12, 14      16, 17, 19
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Brooklyn     June                        Apr.            July 30, 31
             19, 20, 21                  18, 20, 22      Aug. 1
             Aug.                        Aug.            Sept.
             6, 7, 8                     2, 5, 17        27, 28, 30
---------------------------------------------------------------------
New York     June         June 29                        May
             22, 24, 25   July 1, 2                      2, 3, 4
             Sept.        Aug.                           Aug.
             19, 20, 21   3, 16, 19                      13, 14, 15
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Philadelphia June         June           Apr.
             26, 27, 28   22, 24, 25     27, 29, 30
             Aug.         Aug.           Sept.
             2, 3, 5      9, 10, 12      16, 17, 18
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore    July 30, 31  May            July            June
             Aug. 1       1, 2, 4        3, 4, 4         19, 20, 21
             Sept.        Sept.          Sept.           Aug.
             16, 17, 18   19, 20, 21     27, 28, 30      6, 7, 8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Washington   April 19     June           June            July
             May 2, 4     26, 27, 28     19, 20, 21      4, 4
             Aug.         Aug.           Aug.            Sept.
             9, 10, 12    13, 14, 15     6, 7, 8         14, 19, 20, 21
---------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------
CLUBS.       In           In             In              In
             Baltimore.   Washington.    Pittsburgh.     Cleveland.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Boston       Apr.         Apr.           May             May
             27, 29, 30   20, 22, 23     23, 24, 25      13, 14, 15
             Aug.         Sept.          July            July
             13, 14, 15   27, 28, 30     6, 8, 9         25, 26, 27
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Brooklyn     Apr.         Apr.           May             May
             24, 25, 26   27, 29, 30     6, 7, 8         20, 21, 22
             Sept.        Sept.          July            July
             11, 12, 14   16, 17, 18     10, 11, 13      18, 19, 20
---------------------------------------------------------------------
New York     June         July 30, 31    May             May
             26, 27, 28   Aug. 1         16, 17, 18      23, 24, 25
             Aug.         Sept.          July            July
             9, 10, 12    23, 24, 25     25, 26, 27      10, 11, 13
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Philadelphia Apr.         Apr.           May             May
             18, 20, 22   24, 25, 26     13, 14, 15      16, 17, 18
             Sept.        July 3         July            July
             23, 24, 25   Sept. 11, 12   18, 19, 20      6, 8, 9
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore                 June 24, 25    May             May
                          July 1         9, 10, 11       6, 7, 8
                          Aug.           July            July
                          2, 5, 16       22, 23, 24      15, 16, 17
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Washington   June 22, 29                 May             May
             July 2                      20, 21, 22      9, 10, 11
             Aug.                        Sept.           July
             3, 17, 23                   7, 7, 9         22, 23, 24
---------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------
CLUBS.       In           In             In              In
             Cincinnati.  Louisville.    Chicago.        St. Louis.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Boston       May          May            May             May
             20, 21, 22   16, 17, 18     9, 10, 11       6, 7, 8
             July         July           July            July
             15, 16, 17   10, 11, 13     18, 19, 20      22, 23, 24
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Brooklyn     May          May            May             May
             9, 10, 11    23, 25, 26     16, 18, 19      12, 13, 14
             July         July           July            July
             6, 7, 8      14, 15, 16     21, 22, 23      26, 27, 28
---------------------------------------------------------------------
New York     May          May            May             May
             6, 7, 8      9, 10, 11      13, 14, 15      20, 21, 22
             July         July           July            July
             22, 23, 24   18, 19, 20     6, 8, 9         15, 16, 17
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Philadelphia May          May            May             May
             23, 24, 25   6, 7, 8        20, 21, 22      9, 10, 11
             July         July           July            July
             25, 26, 27   22, 23, 24     15, 16, 17      11, 12, 13
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore    May          May            May             May
             12, 13, 14   20, 21, 22     23, 25, 26      16, 18, 19
             July         July           July            July
             18, 20, 21   25, 27, 28     11, 13, 14      6, 7, 8
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Washington   May          May            May             May
             16, 18, 19   12, 13, 14     6, 7, 8         24, 25, 26
             July         July           July            July
             10, 13, 14   6, 7, 8        25, 27, 28      19, 20, 21
---------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------
CLUBS.       In             In            In            In
             Boston.        Brooklyn.     New York      Philadelphia
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Pittsburgh.  Jun 5,6,7      Jun 1,4,10    June 3,8,11   Jun15,17,18
             Aug.24,26,27   Aug. 20,22    Aug. 21       Aug. 31
                            Sept. 5       Sept. 4,6     Sept. 2,3
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Cleveland.   Jun 15,17,18   May 30,30     May 28        Jun 8,10,11
             Aug.28,29,30   June 13       June 12,14    Aug24,26,27
                            Aug. 31       Sept.2,2,5
                            Sept. 4,6
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Cincinnati.  June 1,3,4     June 5,7,17   June 6,15,18  May28,30,30
             Aug. 31,       Aug. 29       Aug. 28,30    Aug20,21,22
             Sept. 2,2      Sept. 7,10    Sept. 9
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Louisville.  June 8,10,11   June 6,15,18  June 5,7,17   Jun12,13,14
             Aug.20,21,22   Aug.26,28,30  Aug. 24,27,29 Sept. 7,7,9

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Chicago.     Jun 12,13,14   May 28        May 30,30     June 1,3,4
             Sept. 4,5,6    June 8,11     June 10       Aug28,29,30
                            Sept. 2,2,9   Aug. 31
                                          Sept. 7,10
----------------------------------------------------------------------
St. Louis.   May 28,30,30   Jun 3,12,14   June 1,4,13   June 5,6,7
             Sept. 7,9,10   Aug. 21,24,27 Aug. 20,22,26 Sept. 4,5,6
             Sept. 2,2
----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------
CLUBS.       In             In            In            In
             Baltimore.     Washington.   Pittsburgh    Cleveland
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Pittsburgh.  June 12,13,14  May 28,30,30  . . . . .     July 1,2,3
             Aug. 28,29,30  July 16,17    . . . . .     Aug. 1,2,3
                            Aug. 19       . . . . .
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Cleveland.   June 1,3,4     June 5,6,7    July 4,4,5    . . . . .
             Sept. 7,9,10   Aug. 20,21,22 Sept.19,20,21 . . . . .
                                                        . . . . .
                                                        . . . . .
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Cincinnati.  June 8,10,11   June 12,13,14 May 1,2,4     Aug. 15,16,17
             Aug. 24,26,27  Sept. 4,5,6   Sept.11,12,14 Sept.16,17,18

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Louisville.  May 28,30,30   June 1,3,4    June 19,20,22 June 24,25,26
             Sept. 4,5,6    Aug. 31       Aug. 8,9,10   Aug. 5,6,7
                            Sept. 2,3
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chicago.     June 5,6,7     June 15,17,18 July 29,30,31 June 27,28,29
             Aug. 20,21,22  Aug. 24,26,27 Sept.16,17,18 Sept.23,24,25


------------------------------------------------------------------------
St. Louis.   June 15,17,18  June 8,10,11  June 27,28,29 May 1,2,4
             Aug. 31        Aug. 28,29,30 Aug. 5,6,7    Aug. 12,13,14

------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
CLUBS.       In             In            In            In
             Cincinnati     Louisville    Chicago       St. Louis
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pittsburgh.  Apr. 23,24,25  Apr. 18,19,20 June 24,25,26 Apr 26,27,29
             Aug. 12,13,14  Sept.23,25,25 Aug. 15,16,17 Sept. 26,27,28

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cleveland.   Apr. 18,20,21  Apr. 27,28,29 June 20,22,23 April 23,24,25
             May 26         Sept.26,28,29 Aug. 8,9,10   Sept. 12,14,15
             July 28
             Aug. 18
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cincinnati.  . . . . .      July 1,2,3    July 4,4,5    June 20, 22,23
             . . . . .      Aug. 1,3      Aug. 5,6,7    Sept. 23,24,25
             . . . . .      Sept. 22
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Louisville.  June 27,29,30  . . . . .     May 2,4,5     July 4,4,5
             Aug. 4         . . . . .     Sept.12,14,15 Aug. 16,17,18
             Sept. 19,21    . . . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chicago.     Apr. 27,28,29  Apr. 23,24,25 . . . . .     April 18,20,21
             Sept.26,28,29  Aug. 11,12,13 . . . . .     Sept. 20,21,23
                                          . . . . .
                                          . . . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
St. Louis.   May 5          July 29,30,31 June 30       . . . . .
             June 24,25     Sept.16,17,18 July 1,2      . . . . .
             Aug. 8,10,11                 Aug. 1,3,4    . . . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------



OUR ILLUSTRATIONS.

The readers of the OFFICIAL GUIDE will receive with pleasure the
innovation of this year, which for the first time, presents to them
twenty-one pages of half-tone portraits of all the leading clubs and
players of America.

Old-timers will appreciate the picture of the famous Red Stockings of
'69.

Herewith we present a key. The individual players in each group are
numbered to correspond with the numbers in the following list:


BALTIMORE BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Ed Hanlon; 2, H.R. Von der Horst; 3, H.H. Von der Horst; 4, W.
Brodie; 5, George Hemming; 6, W. Robinson; 7, D. Brouthers; 8,
J. McMahon; 9, W. Clark; 10, W. Brown; 11, Charles Esper; 12, J. Kelly;
13, H. Reitz; 14, "Kid" Gleason; 15, F. Bonner; 16, J. McGraw; 17,
H. Jennings; 18, W. Keeler; 19, W.V. Hawke.


NEW YORK BASE BALL CLUB, '94. (Photograph copyrighted by Prince, New
York and Washington.)

1, Park A. Wilson; 2, Charles A. Farrell; 3, George Van Haltren; 4,
Roger Connor; 5, Jouett Meekin; 6, Huyler Westervelt; 7, Amos Rusie; 8,
W.H. Clark; 9, Lester German; 10, John J. Doyle; 11, John Ward; 12,
M. Tiernan; 13, Geo. S. Davis; 14, W.B. Fuller; 15, James Stafford; 16,
W.H. Murphy.


PHILADELPHIA BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Callahan; 2, Allen; 3, Delehanty; 4, Boyle; 5, Thompson; 6, Taylor;
7, Hamilton; 8, Reilly; 9, Clements; 10, Weyhing; 11, Hallman; 12,
Irwin; 13, Carsey; 14, Haddock; 15, Hartman; 16, Sharrott; 17, Turner;
18, Grady.


BROOKLYN BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, G. Tredway; 2, M.G. Griffin; 3, T.P. Burns; 4, P. Gilbert; 5, Wm.
Shindle; 6, T.W. Corcoran; 7, T.P. Daly; 8, T.F. Kinslow; 9, D.L. Foutz
(Manager); 10, C.F. Dailey; 11, G. Lachance; 13, G. Q. Shoch; 13,
William Kennedy; 14, D.W. Daub; 15, G.O. Sharrott; 16, E.F. Stein.


CLEVELAND BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Tebeau; 2, O'Connor; 3, Young; 4, Burkett; 5, Ewing; 6, McAleer; 7,
McGarr; 8, Childs; 9, McKean; 10, Dewald; 11, Virtue; 12, Clarkson; 13,
Cuppy; 14, Fisher; 15, Zimmer.


PITTSBURGH BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Shiebeck; 2, Bierbauer; 3, Stigden; 4, Mack; 5, Beckley; 6, Smith; 7,
Lukens; 8, Lyons; 9, Colcolough; 10, Donovan; 11, Killen; 12,
Buckenberger; 13, Ehret; 14, Stenzel; 15, Glasscock; 16, Gumbert; 17,
Nicol.


CINCINNATI BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Chas. Comiskey; 2, Frank Dwyer; 3, Elton Chamberlain; 4, Geo. Cross;
5, Thos. Parrott; 6, Morgan Murphy; 7, Harry Vaughn; 8, Frank Motz; 9,
John McPhee; 10, Arlie Latham; 11, Geo. Smith; 12, Jas. Holliday; 13,
Wm. Hoyt; 14, John McCarthy; 15, Jas. Canavan.

ST. LOUIS BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, A.G. Cooley; 3, A. Twineham; 3, T. Dowd; 4, Thomas Hannigan; 5,
M.F. Hogan; 6, T. Breitenstein; 7, Harry Staley; 8, Roger Connor; 9, Tom
Brown; 10, C.H. Peitz; 11, J.H. McDougal; 12. F. Ely.


WASHINGTON BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Charles Petty; 2, Sam Wise; 3, Joe Mulvey; 4, Wm. Hassamer; 5,
W. Black; 6, Charles Esper; 7, Ed Cartwright; 8, Wm. Joyce; 9, Geo.
Tebeau; 10, Geo. Stephens; 11, Jas. McGuire; 12, G.H. Schmelz; 13, Otis
Stockdale; 14, Jos. Sullivan; 15, Frank Ward; 16, Al Selbach; 17, John
Egan, 18, John McMahon; 19, Paul Radford; 20, D.E. Dugdale; 21,
W.B. Mercer.


SIOUX CITY BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, E. Cunningham; 2, A. Stewart; 3, H. Howe; 4, Chas. Marr; 5, W.F.
Hart; 6, F. Parvin; 7, Chas. Jones; 8. W.H. Watkins (Manager); 9, J.
Walsh; 10, Geo. H. Hogreiver; 11, F. Genins; 12, A. Twineham; 13,
F. Kraus; 14, J. Newell.


ROCK ISLAND-MOLINE BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1. Al Mauck; 2, Belden Hill; 3, W.F. Kreig; 4, Paddy Lynch; 5. Wm.
Zeis; 6, Harry Sage (Manager); 7, Harry Burrell; 8, J.A. Andrews; 9, Joe
Cantillon (Captain); 10, Dan Sweeney.


PETERSBURG BASE BALL CLUB, '94.

1, Jno. Farrell; 2, H.F. Keefer; 3, J. McJannes; 4. R. Fender; 5, John
Foreman; 6, Mike Trost; 7, Geo. Kelly; 8, R. Stafford; 9, L.W. Smith;
10, Bert Myers; 11, Stewart Sanford; 12, Ed Leach; 13, S.T. Honeycutt.


YALE TEAM, '94.

1, J.B. Speer; 2, C.H. George; 3, F. Murphy; 4, F. Rustin; 5, H.M.
Keator; 6, A.A. Bigelow; 7, G.B. Case; 8, M.J. Warner; 9, W.F. Carter;
10, J.R. Quinby; 11, T.S. Arbuthnot; 12, F.B. Stephenson; 13,
G.O. Redington; 14, E.R. Trudeau; 15, J.C. Greenway.


HARVARD TEAM, '94.

1, C.J. Paine; 2, E.W. Ames; 3, J.H. Williams; 4, J. Wiggins; 5, P.W.
Whittemore; 6, B. Cook, Jr.; 7, A. Winslow; 8, A.A. Highlands; 9, F.M.
Carthy; 10, J. Corbett; 11, R. Paine; 12, R. Stevenson; 13, J.J. Hayes;
14, D.D. Scannell; 15, H. Dickinson; 16, W.J. O'Malley.


PRINCETON TEAM, '94.

1. Payne; 2, Bradley; 3, King; 4, Brooks; 5, Trenchard; 6, Otto; 7,
Forsythe; 8, Gunster; 9, W.D. Ward; 10, Mackenzie (Captain); 11,
P. Ward; 12, Lindsay; 13, Small; 14, Altman; 15, Williams.


UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA TEAM, '94.

1, Blair; 2, Brown; 3, Sinclair; 4, Stokes; 5, Dickson; 6, Blakely; 7,
Reese; 8, Hollister; 9, Higgins; 10, Mintzner; 11, Coogan; 12, Thomas;
13, Gelbert; 14, Goeckel.


THE FAMOUS RED STOCKINGS.

1, Charles Gould, First Base; 2, Charles Sweasey, Second Base; 3, Asa
Brainard, Pitcher; 4, Cal McVey, Right Field; 5, Harry Wright, Centre
Field (Capt.); 6, George Wright, Short Stop; 7, "Dug" Allison, Catcher;
8, Fred Waterman, Third Base; 9, Andy Leonard, Left Field.




#A Compliment to the Editor of The Guide.#

At the annual meeting of the National League, held at the Fifth Avenue
Hotel, New York, on Nov. 15, 1894, on a motion made by C.H. Byrne,
president of the Brooklyn club, Henry Chadwick, the veteran base ball
writer, and editor of the League GUIDE since 1881, was, by a unanimous
vote, made an honorary member of that body. This honor has been
conferred upon but four other persons in the history of the League,
namely: A.G. Mills, of New York, ex-President of the League;
A.G. Spalding, of Chicago; George W. Howe, of Cleveland, and John
B. Day, of New York. In presenting Mr. Chadwick's name Mr. Byrne spoke
enthusiastically of the effective work the veteran had done for years in
popularizing base ball, and called attention to the fact that
Mr. Chadwick was the recognized authority in all matters pertaining to
base ball, and to him more than any other individual living is due the
credit for the present almost perfect code of rules governing the game.

The League subsequently appointed a committee, consisting of President
N.E. Young, C.H. Byrne, of Brooklyn, and A.J. Reach, of Philadelphia, to
prepare a proper address to Mr. Chadwick, and to have same engrossed and
framed for presentation. The result of their official duty was an
exceptionally handsome piece of engrossing, set in a gilt frame. A
pastel portrait of Mr. Chadwick is in the centre of a decorative scroll
on which is the following testimonial:



                The
NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
                of
PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS OF THE UNITED STATES
                to
          HENRY CHADWICK.

At a regular annual meeting of the National League and American
Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs, held in New York City,
November 15, 1894, all twelve clubs being present,

       MR. HENRY CHADWICK,
       of Brooklyn, N. Y.,
was by a unanimous vote elected an
        HONORARY MEMBER
          of this body.

In conferring this membership this organization pays the highest tribute
in its power to one who, during a number of years almost as great as is
usually alloted to man to live, has unselfishly devoted his time, his
talents and his energies, by voice and pen, to establish BASE BALL as
the NATIONAL GAME of America.

At all times and in all places he has diligently worked for its
DEVELOPMENT, and battled for its INTEGRITY, its HONESTY and the PURITY
of its methods.

He has been an unflinching foe of those within the ranks who permitted
any stigma to attach to it and a gallant defender against any attack
from without, touching its good name and fame. Always a devoted friend
of the honest ball player, he has been a never-failing advocate of the
rights of and the respect due the umpire. His advice and good offices
most frequently sought have ever been readily given, and to the benefit
and advantage of all.

We pay this tribute with pleasure and deference to

          HENRY CHADWICK,

the father of base ball, who now in the full of his years and after a
long life of usefulness to his fellow man, still lives to see the
fruition of his fondest hopes, and base ball, which he has fostered and
upheld, pleaded for and battled for, now established forevermore as our
national game.

The National League and American Association of Professional Base Ball
Clubs, Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington,
Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago.

N.E. YOUNG,
C.H. BYRNE,
A.J. REACH,
    *Committee.

NEW YORK, November 15, 1894.




[Advertisement]

This Trade Mark

[Illustration: Spalding: Trade Mark]

The Standard of Comparison The World Over,

and which has stood the test of years, will be stamped in the future, as
in the past, on all goods manufactured by us and will guarantee each
article, from the cheapest to the highest priced, as the very best that
can be produced for the money.

But this additional Trade Mark--

[Illustration: The Spalding: Highest Quality]

will be placed on the "Highest Quality" goods in their respective line
and will be a further guarantee that the article so stamped represents
the very highest grade of material, workmanship and finish, and the most
perfect in design our past experience enables us to produce.

#Our Complete Catalogue of "SPRING AND SUMMER SPORTS" Mailed FREE to any
Address.#

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA.
SPALDING'S COMPLETE UNIFORMS.

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illustration]

Our line of flannels for Base Ball Uniforms consists of five qualities
and over forty different patterns. Each grade is kept up to the highest
point of excellence, and patterns changed every season; base ball
players may be assured that whatever grade of uniform is selected, it
will be the very best that can be furnished for the money. On orders for
complete sets of uniforms, we make no charge for lettering; on orders
for single suits we charge _Five Cents_ per letter. Special measurement
blanks, samples of flannel and belt webbing for all the following
uniforms furnished on application.

No. 0. Uniform, complete,
  Plain Pants              $14.00
No. 1. Uniform, complete,
  Plain Pants               11.00
No. 2. Uniform, complete,
  Plain Pants                8.40
No. 3. Uniform, complete,
  Plain Pants                6.00
No. 4. Uniform, complete,
  Plain Pants                4.25
No. 5. Uniform, complete.
  Plain Pants                2.75
On No. 0 Uniform, Padded
  Pants extra                1.00
On Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Uniforms,
  Padded Pants                .75

       *       *       *       *       *

#
OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE OF
SPRING and SUMMER SPORTS,
HANDSOMELY ILLUSTRATED,
#

And Containing Every Requisite for #Athletic Sports#, mailed
free to any address.

       *       *       *       *       *

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,

NEW YORK.  CHICAGO.  PHILADELPHIA.




[Advertisement]

ATHLETIC UNIFORMS
AND
Wearing Apparel for All Sports.

SPORTSMEN'S WEAR

[Illustration: OUR BROOKLYN FACTORY.]

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SEND FOR OUR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE.




[Advertisement]

SPALDING'S CATCHER'S MITTS.

Made in Rights and Lefts, and without Throwing Gloves.

[Illustration: No. 7/0.]
[Illustration: No. 0X.]
[Illustration: No. 3.]

[Illustration: The Spalding: Highest Quality]

Highest Quality Mitt, made of
the finest selected leather,
heavily padded and laced all
around.                                            Each, $7.50

The "Morill" Mitt.
Special design, made of finest drab buckskin, heavily
padded; a soft, easy fitting mitt.                 Each, $6.00

No. 5/0. Spalding's League Mitt, finest selected hogskin,
laced back and well padded; a strong, durable
mitt.                                              Each, $5.00

No. 0X. Spalding's "Decker Patent" Mitt, hand of
soft deerskin, back of selected hogskin, laced, and sole
leather reinforce on back for additional protection,
well made and padded; the original catchers' mitt.
                                                   Each, $3.50

No. 0. Spalding's Catchers' Mitt, hand of soft tanned
deerskin, back-piece selected hogskin, laced back and
well padded.                                       Each, $3.00

No. A. Spalding's Amateur Mitt, extra quality leather,
heavily padded, lace back.                         Each, $2.00

No. 3. Spalding's Practice Mitt, hand of grain leather,
back of sheepskin, laced all around and well padded.
                                                   Each, $1.00

       *       *       *       *       *

Boys' Mitts.

[Illustration: No. 2.]

No. 0XB. Spalding's "Decker Patent" Boys' Mitt,
hand-piece of velvet tanned deerskin, back of fine
hogskin, sole leather reinforced patent back for extra
protection to fingers, laced and heavily padded.
                                                   Each, $2.00

No. 2. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, tanned buckskin, laced
back and nicely padded.                            Each, $1.50

No. 4. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, front and back grain
leather, hand-piece yellow tanned sheepskin, laced
back and well padded.                               Each, 50c.

No. 5. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, leather front hand-piece;
a strong and durable glove for boys.                Each, 25c.

       *       *       *       *       *

Our Complete Illustrated Catalogue Mailed Free.

A. G. Spalding & Bros.,   CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK.




[Advertisement]

OUR LATEST NOVELTY

[Illustration: _Fastened by Clamp furnished with each machine, but not
shown in cut_]

THE
"BABY"
SEWING MACHINE

A Perfect Little Machine.

CHARGES PREPAID to any Express
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Price, $2.50. Charges Prepaid.

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PECK & SNYDER,
11 and 13 BEEKMAN ST.,

P.O. Box 2751.                      NEW YORK CITY.





[Advertisement]

Spalding's Base Ball Goods.

Spalding's Basemen's Mitts.

Made in Rights and Lefts.

No. 3X. [The Spalding logo] Base Mitt, finest velvet
tanned buckskin, perfectly
padded, highest
quality.
                                                  Each, $3.00
[Illustration: No. 4X]

No. 4X. Spalding's Basemen's Mitt, soft tanned
brown leather, fine felt padding, made in rights and
lefts.                                            Each, $2.00

No. 5X. Spalding's Basemen's Mitt, made of special
gold tanned leather, well padded, rights and lefts.
                                                  Each, $1.00

Spalding's Boys' Basemen's Mitt, same as our No. 5X, but smaller
sizes.                                              Each, 50c.


Spalding's Basemen's Mitt.

In Rights and Lefts.

[Illustration]

No. BX. [The Spalding logo] Basemen's Mitt, finest
velvet tanned buckskin,
laced edge, perfectly
padded,
highest quality.
                                                  Each, $4.00

Spalding's Infielders' Glove.

In Rights and Lefts.

[Illustration]

No. 2X. [The Spalding logo] Infielders' Glove, finest
velvet tanned buckskin,
perfectly padded,
highest quality.
                                                  Each, $3.00

No. X. Spalding's Amateur Infielders' Glove.
                                                  Each, $1.50


Spalding's Body Protectors.

GRAY'S PATENT.

[Illustration]

Made of rubber and inflated with air. The only safe and
reliable Body Protector.

                                                        EACH.
No. 00. Umpire Body Protector.                         $10.00
No. 0.  League  "       "                               10.00
No. 1.  Amateur "       "                                6.00
No. 2.  Boys'   "       "                                5.00

       *       *       *       *       *

Our complete Catalogue of "Spring and Summer Sports," mailed free to
any address.

       *       *       *       *       *

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,
New York. Chicago. Philadelphia.




[Advertisement]

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[Illustration]

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[Illustration]

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[Illustration]

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CLAYTON, Jefferson County, N.Y.




[Advertisement]

SPALDING'S BASE BALL GOODS.

Spalding's Club Bat Bags.

[Illustration: No. 2]

                                                         Each.
No. 0. League Club Bag, sole leather, for 18 bats       $15.00
No. 1, Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 24 bats         5.00
No. 2. Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 12 bats         4.00

Individual Bags.

[Illustration: No. 02.]

                                                           Each.
No. 01. Sole Leather Bag, for two bats                     $4.00
No. 02. Heavy Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at both ends    1.50
No. 03. Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at one end            1.00

Athletes' Uniform Bag.

For carrying Base Ball and other Uniforms,
made to roll, and will not wrinkle or
soil same, separate compartment for shoes.

[Illustration]

                                        Each
No. 1. Canvas                           $2.50
No. 2. Leather                           3.50

Spalding's Bases.

Three Bases to a set.

[Illustration]

                                                            Per Set.
No. 0. League Club Bases, extra quality, quilted, with spikes  $7.50
No. 1. Best Canvas Bases, not quilted, with spikes              5.00
No. 2. Ordinary Canvas Bases, with spikes                       4.00

Home Plates.

[Illustration]

                                                  Each.
No. 1. Rubber Home Plate, League regulation,      $7.50
           complete, with spikes
No. 2. Marble Home Plates, best quality            2.00
No. 3. Plate for Pitcher's Box                     5.00

Spalding's Indicators.

[Illustration]

                                             Each.
No. O.    Umpire Indicators                  $0.50
No. 1.    Scoring Tablets                      .35

Our Complete Catalogue of "Spring and Summer Sports" Mailed
Free to Any Address.

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA.




[Advertisement.]
[Illustration: Wright & Ditson advertisement.]

Wright & Ditson

Send for our complete illustrated catalogue

Manufacturers of the famous Campbell racket

Publishers of the Official Lawn Tennis Guide
for 1895... Price 15 cents

Lawn Tennis, Baseball, Athletic Goods

Uniforms for all outdoor sports

Wright & Ditson's Championship ball

Adopted by the United States Lawn Tennis Association, Intercollegiate
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Retail, 344 Washington St., Boston, Mass.
Wholesale, 95 Pearl St., Boston, Mass.




[Advertisement.]

SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY.

_Published Monthly. Each Number Complete.
Devoted to all kinds of Sports._

No. 1. LIFE AND BATTLES OF JAMES J. CORBETT.

No. 2. INDIAN CLUBS AND DUMB BELLS. By J.H. DOUGHERTY,
Amateur Champion of America.

No. 3. BOWLING. By A.E. VOGELL. Containing instructions How to
Bowl, How to Score, How to Handicap.

No. 4. BOXING. This book is, without doubt, the most valuable
manual of its kind ever published. It is fully illustrated.

No. 5. GYMNASTICS. By ROBERT STOLL, N.Y.A.C., America's
Champion on the Flying Rings since 1885.

No. 6. LAWN TENNIS. By O.S. CAMPBELL.

No. 7. BASE BALL. By WALTER CAMP.

No. 8. GOLF. By J. STUART BALFOUR.

No. 9. ATHLETES' GUIDE. Articles on Training, Sprinting, Throwing
Weights, Walking, etc., and Rules for Government of Athletic Games.

No. 10. CROQUET. Official Rules of the Game as adopted by the
National Croquet Association.

No. 11. SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE AND
REFEREE'S BOOK. Revised by WALTER CAMP.

No. 12. GAELIC AND ASSOCIATION FOOT BALL. Complete
Methods and Rules of each Game.

No. 13. HANDBALL. How to Play It. Rules and Definitions, Regulation
Court and its construction, with other interesting matter.

NO. 14. CURLING, HOCKEY AND POLO. Rules governing each
game, and other valuable information.

No. 15A. INDOOR BASE BALL GUIDE. Complete Illustrations for
Playing, with Description of Game.

No. 16. SKATING. History of Skating, from earliest appearance to the
present day, to which is added a list of the most authentic records.

No. 17. BASKET BALL, Latest Revised Rules, with diagrams showing
position of players, etc.

No. 18. FENCING. Complete Manual of Foil and Sabre, according to
the methods of the best modern school.

No. 19. SPALDING'S OFFICIAL BASE BALL GUIDE FOR 1894.
Complete hand-book of the National Game of Base Ball.

No. 20. CRICKET GUIDE. By GEO. WRIGHT. Fully Illustrated.

No. 21. ROWING. By E.J. GIANNINI, Champion Amateur Oarsman.
Fully illustrated.

No. 22. CROQUET. As adopted by the National Croquet Ass'n. Ill'd.

No. 23. CANOEING. By C. BOWYER VAUX.

No. 24. OFFICIAL FOOT BALL GUIDE FOR 1894. Edited by
WALTER CAMP. Contains revised rules, portraits of leading players, etc.

No. 25. SWIMMING. By WALTER G. DOUGLAS. Illustrated.

No. 26. HOW TO PLAY FOOT BALL. By WALTER CAMP. Ill'd.

No. 27. COLLEGE ATHLETICS. By M.C. MURPHY.

No. 28. ATHLETIC ALMANAC. By JAMES E. SULLIVAN.

No. 29. EXERCISING WITH PULLEY WEIGHTS. H.S. ANDERSON

No. 30. HOW TO PLAY LACROSSE. By W.H. CORBETT.

EACH COPY, 10 CENTS.

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
241 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.




[Advertisement]

#REACH'S
BASE BALL GOODS.#

The #Reach American Association Ball# is the best
made and #guaranteed# to give satisfaction.

[Illustration]

The #Reach Special Catchers' Mitts# used by all #League
Catchers#, made in either #Buckskin# or #Calfskin#, with
#Patent Lacing and Deep Pocket#.

[Illustration]
#PRICE, $7.50 EACH.#

#OTHER GRADES DOWN TO 25c. EACH.#

We also make the famous #Irwin# line of #Catchers'# Mitts
and  #Fielders'# Gloves.


A.J. REACH CO.,
Tulip and Palmer Sts., PHILADELPHIA, PA.




[Advertisement]

CHAMPION JAMES J. CORBETT

USED THE

"Corbett"
(TRADE MARK)

Boxing Gloves

Manufactured by A.J. REACH CO.,
Tulip and Palmer Streets, Philadelphia, Pa.,

In his Fight with MITCHELL At Jacksonville, Jan. 25, 1894.

The REACH
Is on the Wrist
[Illustration]
Trade Mark
of every Glove.

An Exact Duplicate of the Gloves used by CORBETT
will be sent upon Receipt of Price.

Per Set,  $7.50.

If you cannot get them in your city, address

A.J. REACH  CO.,
Tulip and Palmer Sts., Philadelphia, Pa.




[Advertisement]

_A. H. SPINK, Editor.           C. C. SPINK, Business Manager._

THE SPORTING NEWS,
OF ST. LOUIS.

The Base Ball Paper of the World.

_A Specimen Copy of the Sporting Hews will be Mailed
to Anyone Sending Us His Address._

A magnificent photo-engraved picture of the New York and
Baltimore Base Ball Clubs will be promptly forwarded
on receipt of #$2.00# for one year's subscription to
THE SPORTING NEWS. Either of these pictures will
be given to anyone sending us #$1.00# for a six months'
subscription to THE SPORTING NEWS.

THE SPORTING NEWS is the official organ of all minor leagues
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should not fail to get a copy of this paper.

THE SPORTING NEWS,
BROADWAY AND OLIVE ST.,
ST. LOUIS, MO.




[Advertisement]

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN!!

1. ART OF CURVE PITCHING.        3. ART OF ZIGZAG CURVE PITCHING.
2. ART OF BATTING.               4. ART OF BASE RUNNING.

These four books _ought_ to be read by every ball player in America.
Although written for amateurs they are highly recommended by
professionals. You can get more information from them in two hours of
careful study than you can get from field practice in #Two Years#, and
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EDWARD J. PRINDLE, Torrington, Conn.

N. B.--Order all goods direct from me if you desire to get a premium.
_Don't forget it_.

PRACTICAL BALL PLAYING.

By ARTHUR IRWIN.

Without a doubt the most practical book ever written which illustrates
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Probably no man in America is more qualified to write on this subject
than Arthur Irwin of the Philadelphia League Club and Coacher of the
University of Pennsylvania.

12 Full Page Illustrations.     Spalding's Athletic Library No. 32.
PRICE 10 CENTS.


A.G. SPALDING & BROS.,
NEW YORK,            CHICAGO,             PHILADELPHIA,
126-130 Nassau St.   147-149 Wabash Ave.  1216 Chestnut Street.




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[Advertisement]

Spalding's Supporters and Bandages.

FOR ALL ATHLETIC SPORTS.

Supporters.

[Illustration: MORTON'S]
                                                  EACH.
No. 1. Morton's Supporter                         $ .35
No. 2. Rheim's Supporter                            .50
No. 3. Dare's Supporter                            1.00
No. 100. Wrist Supporter                            .25
No. 200. Wrist Supporter                            .50
No. H. Ankle Supporter                       Pair, 1.25
No. 1. Stocking Supporter                      "    .50
No. 2. Stocking Supporter                      "    .35

Elastic Bandages.

[Illustration: SHOULDER CAP.]

[Illustration: WRIST PIECE.]

[Illustration: ANKLE.]

         SHOULDER CAP.                            EACH.
No. 1.    Cotton                                  $3.50
No. 1A.   Silk.                                    5.00

         ELBOW PIECE.
No. 2.    Cotton.                                  1.50
No. 2A.   Silk.                                    2.00

         ARM PIECE.
No. 3.    Cotton.                                  1.50
No. 3A.   Silk.                                    2.00

         KNEE CAP.
No. 4.    Cotton.                                  1.50
No. 4A.   Silk.                                    2.00

         ANKLE PIECE.
No. 5.    Cotton.                                  1.50
No. 5A.   Silk.                                    2.00

         WRIST PIECE.
No. 6.    Cotton.                                   .75
No. 6A.   Silk.                                    1.00

Suspensories.

CHICAGO SUSPENSORIES.
No. 70.   Non-Elastic Bands.                                  $ .25
No. 71.   Elastic Buttock Bands.                                .50
No. 72.   Full Elastic Bands.                                   .75
No. 731/2.  Elastic Bands, silk sack.                            1.00
No. 75.   Elastic Bands, satin top piece.                      1.25
No. 76.   Silk Elastic Bands, satin trimmings.                 2.00

OLD POINT COMFORT.
No. 2.    Elastic Bands, adjusting buckles.                   $1.00
No. 3.    Elastic Bands, silk sack and trimmings.              1.50
No. 4.    Silk Elastic Bands, satin trimmings, fine silk sack. 2.00

Send for our complete Catalogue of "Spring and Summer Sports,"
handsomely illustrated, and the most comprehensive Catalogue ever
issued.
Mailed free.

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,
New York.  Chicago.  Philadelphia.





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[Illustration]

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[Advertisement]

SPALDING'S UNIFORM  GOODS.

BASE BALL BELTS.

Worsted Web Belts.
2-1/2 inches wide.

[Illustration: No. 00.]
[Illustration: No. 2.]
[Illustration: No. 4.]
                                        EACH.
No. 00. Special League Belt.            $0.50
No.  2. Worsted Web, double leather
covered buckle.                           .50
No. 47. Worsted Web, single leather
covered buckle.                           .50

Cotton Web Belts.
2-1/2 inches wide.

No. 23. Double strap, nickel buckle.      .25
No.  4. Single strap, leather mounted,
plain buckles.                            .15

Base Ball Stockings.

[Illustration: 0. 3/0. 3.]
                                        PAIR.
No. 00. Heavy, ribbed, linen sole.      $1.25
No. 3/0. Extra Heavy, plain or striped.  1.50
No. 1.   All Wool, heavy.                1.00
No. 2.   All Wool, medium.                .75
No. 3.   Wool, ordinary weight.           .50
No. 4.   Cotton Stockings.                .25
No. 5/0. Scotch   Wool.                  4.00
No. 4/0. Irish Wool.                     2.50

Spalding's Base Ball Shoes.

[Illustration]
                                        PAIR.
No. 2/0. The Spalding Highest
Quality Base Ball Shoe.                 $7.50
No. 1/0. Finest Calf, hand-sewed,
with plates.                             5.00
No. 1X.  Fine Calf, hand-sewed, with
plates.                                  4.00
No. 3P.  Calf, with plates.              3.50
No. 3.   Calf, no plates.                3.00

       *       *       *       *       *

Our complete Catalogue of Spring and Summer Sports, Athletic Goods and
Uniforms, for all outings, mailed free to any address.

       *       *       *       *       *

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA.

[Illustration: JAMES CHARLTON, GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET AGENT,
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.]




[Advertisement]

SPALDING'S CATCHERS' MASKS.

Black Enameled Wire.

[Illlustration: No. 3/0.]

No. 4/0. Sun Protecting Mask,
black enameled wire,                             EACH.
highest quality                                 $5.00

No. 3/0. Spalding's Neck Protecting Mask, black
enameled wire           $3.50

No. 2/0. Spalding's Special League Mask, heavy
black enameled wire       $3.50

No. 0. Spalding's Regulation Mask, heavy wire,
black enameled      $2.50

       *       *       *       *       *

Catchers' Masks.

[Illlustration: No. 0.]

Bright Wire.                                     EACH.

No. 0.    Spalding's Regulation       $2.00

No. A.    Spalding's Amateur Mask       $1.50

No. B.    Spalding's Amateur Boys' Mask, same as
  No. A, in boys' sizes       $1.00

No. C.    Spalding's Youths' Mask, without head or
  chin piece         .75

No. D.    Spalding's Boys' Mask, without head or
  chin piece         .50

No. E.    Spalding's Boys' Mask, lighter wire,
  without head or chin piece         .25

       *       *       *       *       *

[Illlustration: No. 2/0.]

[Illlustration: No. 0.]

Spalding's Shoe Plates.
                                                   PER PAIR
No. 0.   Hand Forged Toe Plates           50c.
No. 2-0. Hand Forged Heel Plates           50c.
No. 1.   Professional Toe Plates           25c.
No. 1H.  Professional Heel Plates           25c.
No. 2.   Amateur Shoe Plates           10c.

       *       *       *       *       *

Pitchers' Toe Plates.

[Illlustration]

Made of heavy brass and worn on toe of shoe.
A valuable assistant in pitching.                  PAIR.

Rights and Lefts         5Oc.

       *       *       *       *       *

Our Catalogue of "Spring and Summer Sports," handsomely
illustrated, and containing every requisite for athletic
sports, mailed free to any address.

       *       *       *       *       *

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,

NEW   YORK.            CHICAGO.            PHILADELPHIA.




[Advertisement]

I SEE YOU'RE BACK

From a trip
over the

MONON ROUTE

Solid vestibuled
trains Daily, heated
by steam, illuminated
by Pintsch light,

BETWEEN

CHICAGO
INDIANAPOLIS
CINCINNATI
LOUISVILLE
And the SOUTH.
[Illustration:]

Only line to
West Baden and French Lick Springs
The Carlsbad of America.

W.H. McDoel,                 Frank J. Reed,
V.P. and Gen. Mgr.           Gen. Pass. Agt.

CITY TICKET OFFICE,
232 CLARK STREET, CHICAGO.




[Advertisement.]
#SPALDING'S TRADE MARK BATS.#

[Illustration]

Men's Model, made of finest selected
timber, oil finish, and in three approved                         EACH.
models, A, B and C. Each bat in separate
bag. Highest Quality.                                           #$1.00#

Boys' Model, same quality and finish,
in three patterns, A, B and C.                                   #1.00#


[Illustration: No. 3/0.]

No. #3/0.# Spalding's Special Black End League Players' Wagon     EACH.
  Tongue Ash Bat, patent rough handle.                          #$1.00#
No. #0/X.# Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Bat, fine straight
  grained ash.                                                    #.50#
No. #2/X.# Spalding's Black End Antique Finish Bat, extra quality
  Ash.                                                            #.25#

[Illustration]

No. #4.# Spalding's Black End Willow Bat, highly polished and
  very light.                                                     #.50#

#Spalding's Trade-Mark Boys' Bats.#

[Illustration]

No. #0XB.# Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Boys' Bat;       EACH.
  length, 30 and 32 inches.                                     #$0.25#
No. #56.# Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, stained and
  polished, gilt stripes.                                         #.10#
No. #53.# Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, polished, gilt
  stripes.                                                        #.10#
No. #54.# Spalding's Black End Boys' Maple Bat, black stripes, 26
  to 28 inches.                                                   #.05#


       *       *       *       *       *

#Our complete Catalogue of "Spring and Summer Sports," handsomely
illustrated, and containing every requisite for athletic
sports, mailed free to any address.#

       *       *       *       *       *

#A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,

NEW YORK.
CHICAGO.
PHILADELPHIA.#




[Advertisement.]
[Illustration: MICHIGAN CENTRAL
"THE NIAGARA FALLS ROUTE"
THE NORTH SHORE LIMITED]

#A First
Class
Line For
First
Class
Travel.

WHAT THE PAPERS SAY:#

The Michigan Central provides the best possible service that could be
expected between the East and the West.--Christian Leader, Boston.

"Comfort in Travel" has nowhere reached a higher degree of perfection
than on this far and justly famed road.--Christian Herald, Detroit.

The Michigan Central is one of the best managed and most satisfactory
railroads in the world to travel by.--Rochester Post Express.

"Comfort in Travel" is a phrase that among experienced travelers has
come to be almost synonymous with "Michigan Central."--Democrat and
Chronicle.

Safe, luxurious and fast running over a peerless track, amid the
grandest scenery, the Michigan Central trains make comfort in travel a
delightful reality.--Buffalo Enquirer.

"Comfort in Travel," that want of all tourist and commercial birds of
passage, is invariably filled on the Michigan Central, "The Niagara
Falls Route."--Evening Wisconsin.

As for the promise of "Comfort in Travel" by this road, as well as the
speed and safety realized, the many thousands who pass over it will
surely testify that it is kept to the letter.--The Standard, Chicago.

       *       *       *       *       *

#CITY  PASSENGER  AND  TICKET OFFICES#

AT

#67 CLARK STREET, CHICAGO.

64 EXCHANGE STREET, BUFFALO.

BOODY HOUSE BLOCK, TOLEDO.

66 WOODWARD AVENUE, DETROIT.#

       *       *       *       *       *

ROBERT MILLER,
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT,
DETROIT.

O. W. RUGGLES,
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET AGENT,
CHICAGO.




[Advertisement.]
#SPALDING'S UNIFORM GOODS.

Base Ball Shirts.#

No. #0# quality Shirts, regular styles,
                             Each, #$6.00#
No. #1# quality Shirts,   "     #5.00#
No. #2# quality Shirts,   "     #3.75#
No. #3# quality Shirts,   "     #2.75#
No. #4# quality Shirts,   "     #2.00#

[Illustration: Lace Front. Button Front.]

#Base Ball Pants. #

                     Plain. Padded.
No. #O# quality Pants, #$5.00   $6.00#
No. #1#   "       "     #3.75    4.50#
No. #2#   "       "     #2.75    3.50#
No. #3#   "       "     #2.00    2.75#
No. #4#   "       "     #1.35    2.00#

[Illustration: Padded pants.]

#Base Ball Caps.#

Chicago, College, Eton, Skull, Jockey and Boston Styles.

                                            Each.
No. #O# quality, best quality.     #$1.00#
No. #1# quality, lighter flannel,    #.75#
No. #2# quality, good flannel,       #.65#
No. #3# quality, ordinary flannel,   #.50#
No. #4# quality, light flannel,      #.40#

[Illustration: Chicago Style.]

       *       *       *       *       *

#Score Books--Pocket Sizes.#
No. #1.# Paper Cover, 7 games,  Each, #10c.#
No. #2.# Board Cover, 22 games,   "   #25c.#
No. #3.# Board Cover, 46 games,   "   #50c.#

#Club Sizes.#
No. #4.# Board Cover, 30 games,  Each, #$1.00#
No. #5.# Cloth Cover, 60 games,    "    #1.75#
No. #6.# Cloth Cover, 90 games,    "    #2.50#
No. #7.# Cloth Cover, 120 games,   "    #3.00#

Score Cards, per doz., #25c.#

Our Catalogue of Spring and Summer Sports and Athletic Uniforms, mailed
free to any address.

#A. G. SPALDING & BROS.,

NEW YORK.
CHICAGO.
PHILADELPHIA.#


[Advertisement]

_Hunting_
DEER
BEARS
WILD TURKEYS
PRAIRIE CHICKENS
DUCKS

#Fishing#
BLACK BASS
MOUNTAIN TROUT
RED SNAPPER
SPANISH MACKEREL

#Health#
SEASHORE AT SANDIEGO
GULF AT GALVESTON
MOUNTAINS--COLORADO
PLAINS OF KANSAS

All on the
#Santa Fé
Route#
_Greatest Railroad in the World_

For Descriptive
Pamphlets, address
G.T. NICHOLSON, G.P.A.
Monadnock Building,
CHICAGO, ILL.

I can tell you of
some places not
known to most
sportsmen





[Advertisement.]
[Illustration: #SPALDING'S
TRADE MARK BASE BALLS.#

       *       *       *       *       *

The #Spalding League
Ball#, adopted by the National
League and American Association
of Professional Base Ball Clubs.
Warranted to last a full game without
ripping or losing its elasticity or
shape.

                                      EACH.
No.  #1#. Official League Ball, $1.50
No.  #0#. Double Seam Ball,      1.50
No. #1B#. Boys' League Ball,     1.00
No.  #2#. Professional Ball,     1.00
No.  #3#. Amateur Ball,           .75
No.  #5#. King of the Diamond,    .50
No. #2B#. Boys' Professional,     .50
No.  #7#. Boys' Favorite Ball,    .25
NO. #7B#. League Junior Ball,     .25
No. #11#. Bouncer Ball,           .25
No.  #6#. Victor Ball,            .20
No. #14#. Boys' Amateur Ball,     .15
  (All of the above in separate box and sealed.)
No.  #8#. Eureka Ball,            .10
No. #9B#. Boys' Lively Ball,      .10
No. #13#. Rocket Ball,            .05
No. #15#. Dandy Ball,             .05
No. #16#. Boss, 4-piece Ball,     .05
  (The above not in separate box.)

       *       *       *       *       *

#OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE OF

Spring and Summer Sports, Athletic and Uniform Goods.#

The most complete catalogue of its kind ever issued and mailed free to
any address.

       *       *       *       *       *

#A.G. SPALDING & BROS.,

New York.  Chicago.  Philadelphia.#]




[Advertisement]

The Spalding Base Ball Bats
HIGHEST QUALITY

       *       *       *       *       *

These bats are finished in the
natural wood,  and of   the most
carefully selected timber.   Made
in three models, "A," "B" and
"C," and in lengths, 33, 34
and 35 inches, thus giving
sufficient variety in the
lengths, weights and balance
to suit the tastes
of all players. Each
bat is put up in a
separate bag, and
model and length
stamped on the
outside as
shown on
cut

From
Season to
Season our
line of bats
have shown
improvement
in every essential
and vital quality,
material and finish.

[Illustration]

       *       *       *       *       *

#The Spalding League Bat#.--Highest
Quality. In three models,
A, B and C, and lengths 33, 34
and 35 inches. Each bat in separate
bag and quality guaranteed.

Each, $1.00

#The Spalding Boys' Model#.--Highest
Quality. In three reduced models,
A, B and C, and lengths 30 and 32 inches.
Each bat in separate bag and quality guaranteed.

Each, $1.00

OUR
COMPLETE
CATALOGUE
OF

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis and Miscellaneous
Athletic and Sporting Goods

MAILED
FREE
TO ANY
ADDRESS

A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
CHICAGO.
NEW YORK.
PHILADELPHIA.






[Advertisement.]
[Illustration: THE OFFICIAL
SPALDING LEAGUE BALL

ADOPTED BY THE NEW
National League & American Association
FOR 1895

The SPALDING OFFICIAL LEAGUE BALL has been the adopted Ball
of the National League for the past eighteen years, and has again
been adopted by the new National League and American Association
for 1895 a tribute to the excellent qualities of the Spalding
League Ball. Each Ball is carefully wrapped in tin foil. Packed in a
box and securely sealed, and is fully warranted to stand the test,
of a full game without ripping nor losing its elasticity or shape.

PRICE, PER DOZEN, $15.00.
SINGLE BALL, $1.50.]







End of the Project Gutenberg EBook of Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official
League Book for 1895, by Edited by Henry Chadwick

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