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Author: Arnold, Gertrude Weld
Title: A Mother's List of Books for Children
Publisher: Project Gutenberg
Tag(s): houghton; fairy; fairy tales; tales; preface; volume; folks' cyclopaedia; children; american
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Title: A Mother's List of Books for Children

Author: Gertrude Weld Arnold

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Language: English

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                         A MOTHER'S LIST OF BOOKS

                                FOR CHILDREN




                           Non minima pars eruditionis est
                               bonos nosse libros

                                _Inscription over the doorway of Bishop
                                   Cosin's Library, Durham, England_



                              A MOTHER'S LIST

                                     OF

                             BOOKS FOR CHILDREN




                                 COMPILED BY

                             GERTRUDE WELD ARNOLD



                                  CHICAGO
                             A.C. McCLURG & CO.
                                    1909

                                 Copyright
                             A.C. McCLURG & CO.
                                    1909

                  Entered at Stationer's Hall, London, England

                            All rights reserved

                         Published October 9, 1909


                The University Press, Cambridge, U.S.A.




                                    TO

                             MY LITTLE COUSINS

                              RUTH AND ESTHER




_PREFACE_                                                           (p. ix)


This little book, a revision of one privately printed a few years ago,
has been prepared for home use, and for this reason the classification
has been made according to the age, and not the school grade, of the
child. But as children differ so greatly in capacity, it should be
understood that in this respect the arrangement is only approximate.
The endeavor has been made to choose those fairy tales which are most
free from horrible happenings, and to omit all writings which tolerate
unkindness to animals. Humorous books are designated by a star and the
few sad ones by a circle.

The prices given are the same as those in the publishers' catalogues;
booksellers' prices are often less.

My thanks are extended to those publishers who have time and again
courteously provided the facilities for the examination of their
publications.

Miss Annie Carroll Moore, of the New York Public Library, was kind
enough to read for me the notes and comments. I wish most gratefully
to acknowledge the generous assistance given me by Miss Hewins, of   (p. x)
the Hartford Public Library, Miss Hunt, of the Brooklyn Public
Library, and Miss Jordan, of the Boston Public Library, who examined
the List, and suggested some changes and a few additions. Their
approbation is elsewhere expressed.
                                        GERTRUDE WELD ARNOLD.
NUTLEY, NEW JERSEY.




_A MOTHER'S LIST_                                                   (p. xi)


It is said, in that earliest collection of English proverbs which was
made by John Heywood, more than three hundred years ago, that
"Children must learn to creep before they can go." This little book
for which I am asked to write a brief preface is, so far as I can find
out, the first consistent effort yet made towards teaching children to
read on John Heywood's principle. It is safe to say that it is
destined to carry light and joy into multitudes of households. It is
based upon methods such as I vaguely sighed after, nearly fifty years
ago, when I was writing in the _North American Review_ for January,
1866, a paper entitled Children's Books of the Year. The essay was
written by request of Professor Charles Eliot Norton, then the editor
of that periodical, and I can now see how immensely I should have been
relieved by a book just like this Mother's List, a device such as
nobody in that day had the wisdom and faithful industry to put
together.

In glancing over the books discussed in that early paper of mine, it
is curious to see how the very titles of some of the most prominent
have now disappeared from sight. Where are the Little Prudy books  (p. xii)
which once headed the list? Where are the stories of Oliver Optic?
Where is Jacob Abbott's John Gay; or Work for Boys? Even Paul and
Virginia have vanished, taking with them the philosophic Rasselas and
even the pretty story of Undine. Nothing of that list of thirty titles
is now well remembered except Cooper's Leatherstocking and Jane
Andrews's Seven Little Sisters Who Live on the Round Ball That Floats
in the Air, a book which has been translated into the languages of
remote nations of the globe, I myself having seen the Chinese and
Japanese versions. Thus irregular is the award of time and we must
accept it. Meanwhile this new book is organized on a better plan than
any dreamed of at that former period, the books being arranged not
merely by classes alone, but according to the age of the proposed
readers and stretching in regular order from two years old until
fourteen. The whole number of books being very large, there is no
overdue limitation, and this forms the simple but magical method of
reaching every variety of childish mind.

Thus excellent have been the changes: yet it is curious to        (p. xiii)
observe on closer study that the two classes of books which represent
the two extremes among the childish readers--Mother Hubbard and
Shakespeare--may still be said to be the opposite poles between which
the whole world of juvenile literature hangs suspended. A child needs
to be supplied with a proper diet of fancy as well as of fact; and of
fact as well as fancy. He is usually so constituted that if he were to
find a fairy every morning in his bread and milk at breakfast, it
would not very much surprise him; while yet his appetite for the
substantial food remains the same. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
seem nowhere very strange to him, while Chaucer and Spenser need only
to be simply told, while Dana's Two Years Before the Mast and Hughes's
Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby hold their own as well as Jack and
the Bean-Stalk. Grown up people have their prejudices, but children
have few or none. A pound of feathers and a pound of lead will usually
be found to weigh the same in their scales. Nay, we, their
grandparents, know by experience that there may be early cadences in
their ears which may last all their lives. For instance, Caroline  (p. xiv)
Fry's Listener would now scarcely find a reader in any group of
children, yet there is one passage in the book--one which forms the
close of some beggar's story about "Never more beholding Margaret
Somebody and her sunburnt child"--which would probably bring tears to
the present writer's eyes today, although he has not seen the book
since he was ten years of age.

It may be that every mature reader will miss from the list some book
or books of that precious childish literature which once throve and
flourished behind school desks. They were books founded partly on
famous history, as that of Baron Trenck and his escapes from prison,
Rinaldo Rinaldini, and The Three Spaniards. I am told that children do
not now find them in a pedlar's pack as we once found them,
accompanied by buns and peddled like them at recess time. Even if we
should find them both in such a place, they might have no such flavor
for us now. It is something if the flowers of American gossip are
retained in similar stories, even if their atmosphere is retreating
from all the hills. It is enough to know that we have for all our
children the works of Louisa Alcott and Susan Coolidge; that they   (p. xv)
have Aldrich's Story of a Bad Boy and Mrs. Dodge's Hans Brinker and
Miss Hale's Peterkin Papers and The William Henry Letters by Mrs.
Diaz. We need not complain so long as our children can look
inexhaustively across the ocean for Andrew Lang's latest fairy-book
and Grimm's Household Stories as introduced to a new immortality by
John Ruskin.
                                        THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON.
CAMBRIDGE, MASS., _January 4, 1909_.




_APPRECIATIONS_                                                   (p. xvii)


I think your selections very carefully made and well adapted to
children who have books at home and mothers who read them.... With
many congratulations on the excellence of your book, both in form and
substance, believe me yours sincerely,
                                        CAROLINE M. HEWINS.
_Hartford Public Library._


You do not owe me any thanks for my little assistance, for you have
given me quite as much as I have given you. It is more stimulating
than you can believe to discuss the subject with one whose point of
view is not that of the librarian. You must not call yourself an
amateur, however, for you are an expert on children's books. I have
gained a great many ideas from you, and have enjoyed comparing notes
with you immensely.
                             Sincerely yours,
                                        CLARA W. HUNT.
_Brooklyn Public Library._


I am sending back your book with my notes and suggestions. It is (p. xviii)
an uncommonly good list, however, and there is little that I have wished
to add or to take away.... Your list is so good that I know you must
have spent a great deal of time and very definite thought over it. You
have certainly covered the ground thoroughly.... I have enjoyed seeing
your list and shall be greatly interested in seeing it in final form.

                              Sincerely yours,
                                        ALICE M. JORDAN.
_Boston Public Library._




_CONTENTS_                                                         (p. xix)


PREFACE ......................................... ix

A MOTHER'S LIST BY THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON ... xi

APPRECIATIONS ................................. xvii

TWO YEARS OF AGE ................................ 21

THREE YEARS OF AGE .............................. 23

FOUR YEARS OF AGE ............................... 28

FIVE YEARS OF AGE ............................... 32

SIX YEARS OF AGE ................................ 40

SEVEN YEARS OF AGE .............................. 50

EIGHT YEARS OF AGE .............................. 59

NINE YEARS OF AGE ............................... 73

TEN YEARS OF AGE ................................ 92

ELEVEN YEARS OF AGE ............................ 114

TWELVE YEARS OF AGE ............................ 141

THIRTEEN YEARS OF AGE .......................... 171

FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE .......................... 198


AUTHOR AND TITLE INDEX ......................... 233

KEY TO PUBLISHERS .............................. 269




A MOTHER'S LIST OF BOOKS FOR CHILDREN                               (p. 21)




_TWO YEARS OF AGE_

_O Babees yonge, My Book only is made for youre lernynge._
                                        THE BABEES BOOK. _Circa 1475._



PICTURE-BOOKS

     The baby's first book will naturally be a picture-book, for
     pictures appeal to him early, and with great force.... If we
     understood children better, we should realize this vitality which
     pictures have for them, and should be more careful to give them
     the best.
                                        W.T. FIELD.


THE CHILDREN'S FARM.
               Dutton. 1.25

These colored pictures of the different farm animals, mounted on
boards, will please the littlest ones.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Mother Hubbard. Lane. .25

As children are favorably influenced by good pictures, it is a pity to
give them any but the best, among which Walter Crane's certainly
stand. Attention is drawn to the designs of the cover-pages of the  (p. 22)
books of this series, which are quite as attractive as the text
illustrations.

The drawings for Mother Hubbard are among Mr. Crane's most successful
efforts. Tiny folk will be entranced with the pictures of this
marvellous white doggie.

  "This wonderful Dog
  Was Dame Hubbard's delight,
  He could sing, he could dance,
  He could read, he could write."


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               This Little Pig.
               Lane. .25

Let us travel to Piggy-land for a few moments, with the baby, and it
will probably be the first of many trips, with these gay pictures to
guide us.




_THREE YEARS OF AGE_                                                (p. 23)

  _A dreary place would be this earth,
  Were there no little people in it;
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  Life's song, indeed, would lose its charm,
  Were there no babies to begin it._
                                        WHITTIER.



PICTURE-BOOKS

     What an unprejudiced and wholly spontaneous acclaim awaits the
     artist who gives his best to the little ones! They do not place
     his work in portfolios or locked glass cases; they thumb it to
     death, surely the happiest of all fates for any printed book.
                                        GLEESON WHITE.


BANNERMAN, HELEN.
               *The Story of Little Black Sambo.
               Stokes. .50

Written and illustrated by an Englishwoman in India for her two small
daughters, Little Black Sambo, with its absurd story, and funny crude
pictures in color, will delight young children of all lands.


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).
               The Farmer's Boy.
               Warne. .25

These delicately colored prints, with their atmosphere of English
country life, well accord with the old cumulative verses which they
accompany. Mr. Caldecott has charmingly illustrated this and the    (p. 24)
following picture-books. Some of the illustrations in each book are in
color and some in black and white.

  The Caldecott toy-books,
    They fix for all time
  The favorite heroes
    Of nursery rhyme.

  The Caldecott toy-books--
    We never shall find
  A gracefuller pencil,
    A merrier mind!
                      L.


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).
               A Frog He Would a-Wooing Go.
               Warne. .25

The drawings portray Mr. Frog, Mr. Rat, and the tragic ending to the
festivities at Mousey's Hall.

     Caldecott was a fine literary artist, who was able to express
     himself with rare facility in pictures in place of words, so that
     his comments upon a simple text reveal endless subtleties of
     thought.... You have but to turn to any of his toy-books to see
     that at times each word, almost each syllable, inspired its own
     picture.... He studied his subject as no one else ever studied
     it.... Then he portrayed it simply and with inimitable vigor,
     with a fine economy of line and colour; when colour is added, it
     is mainly as a gay convention, and not closely imitative of
     nature.
                                        GLEESON WHITE.


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).                                  (p. 25)
               Hey Diddle Diddle, and Baby Bunting.
               Warne. .25

The pictures to Hey Diddle Diddle are instinct with joyousness. Baby
Bunting's father was a jovial huntsman of the old English type.


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).
               The House that Jack Built.
               Warne. .25

Children will be greatly amused by the funny Rat.

  "That ate the Malt,
  That lay in the House
    that Jack built."


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).
               The Milkmaid.
               Warne. .25

We are glad when the young squire, whose interest in the destination
of the pretty maid the old song recounts, meets his proper deserts
through the clever pencil of Mr. Caldecott.


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).
               The Queen of Hearts.
               Warne. .25

These pictures suggest in color and design those found on playing
cards, and they are very good indeed.


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).                                  (p. 26)
               Ride a-Cock Horse to Banbury Cross, and
               A Farmer Went Trotting upon His Grey Mare.
               Warne. .25

Wouldn't we all like to ride these sturdy nags through the lovely
English country, even if we weren't to have the extra attraction of
seeing a fine lady on a white horse?

Children will love to read of the stout farmer and his pretty
daughter, who went trotting to market,

  "Bumpety, bumpety, bump!"


CALDECOTT, RANDOLPH (Illustrator).
               Sing a Song for Sixpence.
               Warne. .25

The little boy and girl king and queen are fascinating to real little
boys and girls, and it is pleasant to be sure from the pictures that
they liked the same things that children like to-day.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               The Baby's Opera.
               Warne. 1.50

     A Book of Old Rhymes with New Dresses by Walter Crane. The Music
     by the Earliest Masters.--_Title-page._

This collection of English rhymes contains The Mulberry Bush, King
Arthur, Jack and Jill, and many others equally familiar, with the
accompanying music for each.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).                                        (p. 27)
               The Fairy Ship.
               Lane. .25

One of Mr. Crane's best. The duck captain and mouse sailors are
utterly captivating.

  "There were fifty little sailors
  Skipping o'er the decks;
  They were fifty little white mice,
  With rings around their necks."




_FOUR YEARS OF AGE_                                                 (p. 28)

  _He that neer learns his A B C,
  For ever will a blockhead be;
  But he that learns these letters fair,
  Shall have a Coach to take the Air._
                                        THE ROYAL BATTLEDORE.
                                        _Newbery. Circa_ 1744.



PICTURE-BOOKS

  Summer fading, winter comes--
  Frosty mornings, tingling thumbs,
  Window robins, winter rooks,
  And the picture story-books.
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  All the pretty things put by,
  Wait upon the children's eye,
  Sheep and shepherds, trees and crooks,
  In the picture story-books.
                                        STEVENSON.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               The Baby's Own Alphabet.
               Lane. .25

The A B C, accompanied by old English rhymes. There are three or four
illustrations to a page.


FRANCIS, J.G.
               *A Book of Cheerful Cats and Other Animated Animals.
               Century. 1.00

Funny verses and even funnier animal pictures. A delightful book for
old and young, because of the ability shown in the illustrations.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS                                                       (p. 29)

     The mother sits and sings her baby to sleep; here is one of the
     very best opportunities for the right literature at the right
     time.
                                        Mrs. H.L. ELMENDORF.


LANG, ANDREW (Editor).
               The Nursery Rhyme Book.
               Illustrated by L. Leslie Brooke.
               Warne. 1.50

An exceptional collection of the ancient rhymes, songs, charms, and
lullabies, accompanied by interesting pictures.

     "In Mr. Halliwell's Collection, from which this volume is
     abridged, no manuscript authority goes further back than the
     reign of Henry VIII, though King Arthur and Robin Hood are
     mentioned.... Thus our old nursery rhymes are smooth stones from
     the book of time, worn round by constant friction of tongues long
     silent."


STEVENSON, R.L.
               A Child's Garden of Verses.
               Illustrated by Jessie Willcox Smith.
               Scribner. 2.50

It is generally admitted that no one has comprehended and written from
the child's point of view as did Stevenson. This volume should be
among the first to be put into the hands of our little ones.        (p. 30)
Besides the black and white text illustrations there are twelve
full-page pictures in color, all by Jessie Willcox Smith.


STEVENSON, R.L.
               A Child's Garden of Verses.
               Illustrated by Charles Robinson.
               Scribner. 1.50

There are some who will prefer this small edition, beautifully
illustrated in black and white.


WELSH, CHARLES (Editor).
               A Book of Nursery Rhymes.
               Heath. .30

Mr. Welsh has arranged this excellent collection of Mother Goose in
accordance with the child's development, placing the rhymes in four
divisions: Mother Play, Mother Stories, Child Play, and Child Stories.



STORIES

  To Master John the English maid
  A hornbook gives, of gingerbread;
  And that the child may learn the better,
  As he can name, he eats each letter.
  Proceeding thus with vast delight,
  He spells and gnaws from left to right.
                                        PRIOR. _1718._


POTTER, BEATRIX.
               The Tale of Peter Rabbit.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Warne. .50

The diverting history of four little rabbits: Flopsy, Mopsy,
Cotton-tail, and naughty Peter who _would_ go into Mr. McGregor's   (p. 31)
garden, where he had many exciting adventures. The tiny volumes of
this series, with their fascinating colored illustrations, are very
delightful.


SMITH, GERTRUDE.
               The Arabella and Araminta Stories.
               Illustrated by Ethel Reed.
               Small. 1.00

Simple every-day happenings in the lives of little twin sisters,
related with much of the repetition so pleasing to very young
children. There are plenty of pictures.


SMITH, GERTRUDE.
               The Roggie and Reggie Stories.
               Illustrated by M.H. Squire and E. Mars.
               Harper. 1.50

This companion to The Arabella and Araminta Stories tells in the same
pleasant reiterative style of the doings of the little girls' little
twin brothers. The illustrations are in color.




_FIVE YEARS OF AGE_                                                 (p. 32)

  _How am I to sing your praise,
  Happy chimney-corner days,
  Sitting safe in nursery nooks,
  Reading picture story-books?_
                                        STEVENSON.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

  When the ice lets go the river,
  When the wild-geese come again,
  When the sugar-maple swells,
  When the maple swells its buds,
  Then the little blue birds come,
  Then my little Blue Bird came.
                              _Indian lullaby from_
                              THE CHILDHOOD OF JI-SHIB THE OJIBWA.


DEMING, T.O.
               Indian Child-Life.
               Illustrated by E.W. Deming.
               Stokes. 2.00

Pleasant sketches of the children of different tribes, with many
full-page color plates after paintings in water-color, and black and
white illustrations. The big oblong pictures, with their primitive
Indian coloring, are unusually attractive.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES                      (p. 33)

     Jack, commonly called the giant-killer, and Thomas Thumb landed
     in England from the very same keels and war-ships which conveyed
     Hengist and Horsa, and Ebba the Saxon.
                                        SCOTT.


BROOKE, L.L. (Illustrator).
               The Golden Goose Book.
               Warne. 2.00

Mr. Brooke has appropriately illustrated these old favorites: The
Golden Goose, The Story of the Three Bears, The Story of the Three
Little Pigs, and Tom Thumb. Of the four, the most popular is the tale
of the adventures of little Tom, the favorite dwarf of the Court of
King Arthur.

  "Long time he lived in jollity,
    Beloved of the Court,
  And none like Tom was so esteemed
    Amongst the better sort."


LA FONTAINE, JEAN DE.
               Select Fables from La Fontaine.
               Illustrated by L.M. Boutet de Monvel.
               S.P.C.K.
               Stechert. 1.80

This edition is chosen because of Monsieur Boutet de Monvel's charming
small illustrations in color. There are from two to eight pictures on
each page, accompanying the text, which is in verse.                (p. 34)

     As color appeals to the child before he has much notion of form,
     his first picture-book should be colored, and as his ideas of
     form develop slowly, his first pictures should be in outline, and
     unencumbered with detail. The French illustrator, Boutet de
     Monvel, has given us the ideal pictures for young children.
                                        W.T. FIELD.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES
ADAPTED FROM GREAT AUTHORS

     Blind Homer and the chief singer of Israel and skalds and bards
     and minnesingers are all gone, tradition is almost a byword, but
     mothers still live, and children need not wait until they have
     conquered the crabbed types before they begin to love literature.
                                        Mrs. H.L. ELMENDORF.


ADELBORG, OTTILIA.
               *Clean Peter and the Children of Grubbylea.
               Longmans. 1.25

This large oblong book contains simple verses accompanying delightful
full-page pictures in delicate colors somewhat after the French
manner. It tells how Clean Peter brought tidiness to a little town.

  "The children out in Grubbylea
  Are all as clean as clean can be.
  And Peter's living there to-day,
  The children begged him so to stay."


BURGESS, GELETT.                                                    (p. 35)
               *Goops and How To Be Them.
               A Manual of Manners for Polite Infants.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Stokes. 1.50

If there ever was anyone who could cover little pills with a thick
coating of sugar, it was Mr. Burgess when he wrote these clever verses
and drew these ninety original and always funny pictures. Children
delight in the Goops. It is almost worth while being one to have this
volume of warning thrust into our hands.

  "I never knew a Goop to help his mother,
  I never knew a Goop to help his dad,
  And they never do a thing for one another;
  They are actually, absolutely bad!

  "If you ask a Goop to go and post a letter,
  Or to run upon an errand, _how_ they act!
  But somehow I imagine you are better,
  And you _try_ to go, and _cry_ to go, in fact!"


BURGESS, GELETT.
               *More Goops and How Not To Be Them.
               A Manual of Manners for Impolite Infants.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Stokes. 1.50

A delightful companion volume of dreadful examples. With ninety-seven
illustrations.

  "You who are the oldest,
  You who are the tallest,
  Don't you think you ought to help
  The youngest and the smallest?

  "You who are the strongest,                                       (p. 36)
  You who are the quickest,
  Don't you think you ought to help
  The weakest and the sickest?

  "Never mind the trouble,
  Help them all you can;
  Be a little woman!
  Be a little man!"


HEADLAND, I.T. (Translator).
               Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes.
               Revell. 1.00

Mr. Headland, who is a professor in the Imperial University at Peking,
tells us: "There is no language in the world, we venture to believe,
which contains children's songs expressive of more keen and tender
affection.... This fact, more than any other, has stimulated us in the
preparation of these rhymes.... The illustrations have all been
prepared by the translator specially for this work."

The Oriental atmosphere of the book and the many Chinese pictures lead
our children of the Western world most delightfully into this old
land.

  "He climbed up the candlestick,
  The little mousey brown,
  To steal and eat tallow,
  And he couldn't get down.
  He called for his grandma,
  But his grandma was in town,
  So he doubled up into a wheel
  And rolled himself down."


LEAR, EDWARD.                                                       (p. 37)
               *Nonsense Books.
               Little. 2.00

The nonsense classic, which should be among the first books secured
for a child's library. This edition contains all the Nonsense Books,
with all the original illustrations.

  "'How pleasant to know Mr. Lear,'
  Who has written such volumes of stuff!
  Some think him ill-tempered and queer,
  But a few think him pleasant enough."


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume I.
               Rhymes, Jingles, and Fables.
               Heath. .25

     "Mother Goose is the best primer. No matter if the rhymes be
     nonsense verses; many a poet might learn the lesson of good
     versification from them, and the child in repeating them is
     acquiring the accent of emphasis and of rhythmical
     form."--_Preface._


SAGE, BETTY (Pseudonym of Mrs. E. (S.) Goodwin).
               Rhymes of Real Children.
               Illustrated by Jessie Willcox Smith.
               Duffield. 1.50

These verses are written from the child's point of view, and are
delightful alike to young and old. Miss Smith never did better work
than in these beautiful sympathetic pictures and fascinating borders.
The book is a large square one.

  "If you could see our Mother play                                 (p. 38)
  On the floor,
  You'd never think she was as old
  As twenty-four.
  On Sunday, when she goes to church,
  It might be,
  But Tuesdays she is just the age
  Of Joe and me."


UPTON, BERTHA.
               *The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls and a Golliwogg.
               Illustrated by Florence K. Upton.
               Longmans. 2.00

Children will like the funny, brightly colored pictures in this large
oblong book, and will be fascinated by the Golliwogg. The verses are
not equal to the illustrations.



STORIES

     President Thwing says: "Children rarely have but one object in
     reading, and that is to amuse themselves"; and surely in this
     playtime of life this aim should be the chief one.
                                        A.H. WIKEL.


CRAIK, G.M. (Mrs. G.M. (C.) May).
               So-Fat and Mew-Mew.
               Heath. .20

An account of two little animal friends, a cat and dog, which will
please small children who are outgrowing Mother Goose.


HOPKINS, W.J.
               The Sandman: His Farm Stories.
               Page. 1.50

Very simple and delightful narratives of the life of a little boy   (p. 39)
on a farm seventy-five years ago. The atmosphere of the sketches
is redolent of wholesome country life. They were used as bedtime
stories at home for several years before publication.


POTTER, BEATRIX.
               The Tale of Benjamin Bunny.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Warne. .50

The story of little Benjamin Bunny's visit to his cousin Peter Rabbit.
A companion volume to The Tale of Peter Rabbit. These colored pictures
of the small bunnies seem to the compiler the cunningest of this
charming series.


POTTER, BEATRIX.
               The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Warne. .50

Telling how bad little Nutkin was rude and saucy to Old Brown the owl,
and what came of it. Very exciting, but not harrowing, even for tiny
listeners. The pictures are in color.




_SIX YEARS OF AGE_                                                  (p. 40)

     _"Babies do not want," said he, "to hear about babies; they like
     to be told of giants and castles, and of somewhat which can
     stretch and stimulate their little minds_".
                              Dr. JOHNSON. _Recorded by Mrs. Piozzi._



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

  Happy hearts and happy faces,
  Happy play in grassy places--
  That was how, in ancient ages,
  Children grew to kings and sages.
                                        STEVENSON.


WALKER, M.C.
               Lady Hollyhock and Her Friends.
               Baker. 1.25

Suggestions for making charming dollies from fruits, vegetables, and
flowers. The illustrations, many in color, are attractive and
explanatory, but the text must be read to the children, as it is
somewhat advanced for them.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

  Little Indian, Sioux or Crow,
  Little frosty Eskimo,
  Little Turk or Japanee,
  O! don't you wish that you were me?
    .    .    .    .    .    .    .
  You have curious things to eat,                                   (p. 41)
  I am fed on proper meat;
  You must dwell beyond the foam,
  But I am safe and live at home.
                                        STEVENSON.


ANDREWS, JANE.
               The Seven Little Sisters Who Live on the Round Ball That
               Floats in the Air.
               Ginn. .50

These simple stories, written for the girls and boys of a generation
ago, have taken their place among the charming and vivid descriptions
of child-life in different lands.

     The round ball is the earth, and the sisters are the tribes that
     dwell thereon. The little book was conceived in a happy hour; its
     pictures are so real and so graphic, so warm and so human, that
     the most literal and the most imaginative of children must find
     in them, not only something to charm, but also to mould pleasant
     associations for maturer years.
                                        THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

     And as with the toys, so with the toy-books. They exist
     everywhere: there is no calculating the distance through which
     the stories come to us, the number of languages through which
     they have been filtered, or the centuries during which they have
     been told. Many of them have been narrated, almost in their
     present shape, for thousands of years since, to little
     copper-coloured Sanscrit children, listening to their mother
     under the palm-trees by the banks of the yellow Jumna--their   (p. 42)
     Brahmin mother, who softly narrated them through the ring in
     her nose. The very same tale has been heard by the Northmen
     Vikings as they lay on their shields on deck; and by Arabs
     couched under the stars on the Syrian plains when the flocks were
     gathered in and the mares were picketed by the tents.
                                        THACKERAY.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Aladdin.
               Lane. .25

These richly colored Eastern pictures will give even little children a
suggestion of the splendor of the Orient. Let us hope that they will
never be too ready to answer the call of "New lamps for old ones."

     Walter Crane is the serious apostle of art for the nursery, who
     strove to beautify its ideal, to decorate its legends with a real
     knowledge of architecture and costume, and to mount the fairy
     stories with a certain archaeological splendor.... As a maker of
     children's books, no one ever attempted the task he fulfilled so
     gayly, and no one since has beaten him on his own ground.
                                        GLEESON WHITE.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
               Lane. .25

It seems hardly right to omit this edition of so celebrated a tale
pictured by so celebrated an artist, yet Mr. Crane's work breathes
mystery and Oriental cunning from every page, and should be given to
our youngsters only after examination, as a highly-strung child might
be frightened by it. The picture of the resourceful Morgiana filling
the oil-jars, while a dreadful robber with saucer-like eyes peers   (p. 43)
from one of them, is awful indeed.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Beauty and the Beast.
               Lane. .25

Charming illustrations accompany this prose version of the ancient
favorite which will long endure because of the great truth underlying
the grotesque tale.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Cinderella.
               Lane. .25

May every little girl find the fairy prince of her imagination!


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               The Frog Prince.
               Lane. .25

The story of the frog who was transformed into the handsome prince is
as immortal as childhood. May we all remember the King's command to
his daughter: "He who helped you in the time of your trouble must not
now be despised."


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Jack and the Bean-Stalk.
               Lane. .25

Ogre-like indeed is the giant, and we breathe a sigh of relief when
verses as well as pictures make it quite certain that Jack has escaped
for the third time with his golden treasure. The beans of King      (p. 44)
Alfred's day seem to have closely resembled the wild oats of our own.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               The Sleeping Beauty.
               Lane. .25

  "So sweet a face, so fair--was never
      beauty such as this;
  He stands--he stoops to gaze--he kneels--
      he wakes her with a kiss.
  He leads her forth; the magic sleep
      of all the Court is o'er--
  They wake, they move, they talk, they laugh,
      just as they did of yore
  A hundred years ago."



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS

     Children seem to possess an inherent conviction that when the
     hole is big enough for the cat, no smaller one at the side is
     needed for the kitten. They don't really care for "Glimpses" of
     this, or "Gleanings" of that, or "Footsteps" to the other--but
     would rather stretch and pull, and get on tiptoe to reach the
     sweeter fruit above them, than confine themselves to the crabs
     which grow to their level.
                                        Miss RIGBY. _1844._


COWPER, WILLIAM.
               *The Diverting History of John Gilpin.
               Illustrated by Randolph Caldecott.
               Warne. .25

A spirited delineation of the never-to-be-forgotten ride.


COX, PALMER.                                                        (p. 45)
               *The Brownies: Their Book.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Century. 1.50

Every child should know Mr. Cox's prankish, helpful Brownies. The
verses are accompanied by many delightful pictures.


HAZARD, BERTHA (Editor).
               Three Years with the Poets.
               Houghton. .50

While these selections are intended for memorization by children, and
are arranged by months for the school year, the collection is so good
as to fill a useful place in the home library. At the end of the book
are a few pages of wisely chosen little selections of poetry and
prose, truly called Helps for the Day's Work.


OSTERTAG, BLANCHE (Editor and Illustrator).
               Old Songs for Young America.
               Music arranged by Clarence Forsyth.
               Doubleday. 2.00

The familiar songs, set to the music of the old tunes, and charmingly
illustrated,--the costumes those of olden days. Some of the pictures
are in color and some in black and white. The Monkey's Wedding, Bobby
Shafto, and Old Dan Tucker, are included in the contents.


OUR CHILDREN'S SONGS.
               Harper. 1.25

This carefully chosen collection--in which American poets are well
represented--although made over thirty years ago, still holds its   (p. 46)
own as a standard. One of the divisions is devoted to hymns.


TAYLOR, JANE and ANN.
               Little Ann, and Other Poems.
               Illustrated by Kate Greenaway.
               Warne. 1.00

It is a good thing for children to learn from these quaint verses,
with their charming illustrations, the sort of reading which pleased
the small folks of long ago. The Taylors seldom struck so happy a vein
as in the poem called The Field Daisy, which begins:

  "I'm a pretty little thing,
  Always coming with the Spring;
  In the meadows green I'm found,
  Peeping just above the ground,
  And my stalk is covered flat
  With a white and yellow hat."

I prefer the little girls and boys ... that come as you call them, fair
or dark, in green ribbons or blue. I like making cowslip fields grow
and apple-trees bloom at a moment's notice. That is what it is, you
see, to have gone through life with an enchanted land ever beside
you.--Kate Greenaway to Ruskin.



RELIGION AND ETHICS

  Little Jesus, wast Thou shy
  Once, and just so small as I?
  And what did it feel like to be
  Out of Heaven, and just like me?
  Didst Thou sometimes think of _there_,

  And ask where all the angels were?                                (p. 47)
  I should think that I would cry
  For my house all made of sky;
  I would look about the air,
  And wonder where the angels were;
  And at waking 'twould distress me--
  Not an angel there to dress me!

  Hadst Thou ever any toys,
  Like us little girls and boys?
  And didst Thou play in Heaven with all
  The angels, that were not too tall,
  With stars for marbles? Did the things
  Play _Can you see me?_ through their wings?
                                        FRANCIS THOMPSON.


THE BIBLE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.
               Century. 1.50

This careful chronological arrangement of Bible history, from the King
James version, is very satisfactory. The book is a large one, with
full-page illustrations from the Old Masters.



STORIES

     It is enough fame for any author to be loved by children,
     generation after generation, long after he himself has left the
     scene.
                                        W.A. JONES. _1844._


ABBOTT, JACOB.
               A Boy on a Farm.
               Edited by Clifton Johnson.
               From Rollo at Work and Rollo at Play.
               Introduction by Dr. Lyman Abbott.
               American Book. .45

     Few books axe remembered with greater affection by persons     (p. 48)
     who were children in the middle of the last century than those
     written by Jacob Abbott.... The educational effect of Jacob
     Abbott's stories, both mental and moral, was very great.... The
     insistence, however, with which these virtues were proclaimed and
     emphasized, constitutes a weakness in the books as we view them
     now.--_Preface._

     Here we have the very saturnalia of common-sense.... These works
     are invaluable to fathers; by keeping always one volume in
     advance of his oldest son, a man can stand before the household,
     an encyclopaedia of every practical art.
                                        THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON.


CRANE, WALTER (Illustrator).
               Goody Two Shoes.
               Lane. .25

The text of this famous tale, attributed to Oliver Goldsmith, is
perhaps somewhat beyond the easy comprehension of children of six
years, but they will enjoy the interesting pictures of Margery and her
animal friends.


SCUDDER, H.E. (Editor).
               The Children's Book.
               Houghton. 2.50

If a child could have but one story-book, a better choice could
scarcely be made than this storehouse of fables, wonder tales, myths,
songs, and ballads. Selections from Andersen, The Arabian Nights,
Gulliver, and Munchausen, are included. There are many illustrations.


TRIMMER, S. (K).                                                    (p. 49)
               The History of the Robins.
               Edited by E.E. Hale.
               Heath. .20

Small people like to hear about this father and mother robin and their
four babies.

     Mrs. Sarah Trimmer ... was a woman of more than the average
     education and accomplishment of her day, and enjoyed the
     friendship of Dr. Samuel Johnson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and nearly
     all of the more celebrated English authors and painters of that
     time. She wrote a great many books.... They are now nearly all of
     them dead and forgotten; but one of them at least has lived, and
     has been the delight of thousands of children for over
     three-quarters of a century.--_Introduction._


WIGGIN, K.D. (S.), and N.A. SMITH.
               The Story Hour.
               Houghton. 1.00

These fourteen little stories include some about children and some
about animals. They are just the sort of narratives that small folks
love, and are designed for retelling in the kindergarten and home.
There are, in addition, three adaptations of well-known tales:
Moufflou, Benjy in Beastland, and The Porcelain Stove, and a poem by
Mrs. Wiggin.




_SEVEN YEARS OF AGE_                                                (p. 50)

  _To go sailing far away
  To the pleasant Land of Play;
  To the fairy land afar
  Where the Little People are._
                                        STEVENSON.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

  So many, and so many, and such glee.
                                        KEATS.


WHITE, MARY.
               The Child's Rainy Day Book.
               Doubleday. 1.00

This fully illustrated little volume gives clear directions for making
simple toys and games, weaving baskets, working with beads, clay, et
cetera. There is a good chapter on Gifts and How to Make Them.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

  Where shall we adventure, to-day that we're afloat,
  Wary of the weather and steering by a star?
  Shall it be to Africa, a-steering of the boat,
  To Providence, or Babylon, or off to Malabar?
                                        STEVENSON.


ANDREWS, JANE.
               Each and All.
               Ginn. .50

A companion volume to The Seven Little Sisters, telling more of     (p. 51)
these happy children and their common bond of loving friendship.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

   This is fairy gold, boy, and 't will prove so.
                                        SHAKSPERE.


BROWNE, FRANCES.
               Granny's Wonderful Chair and Its Tales of Fairy Times.
               Dutton. .35

A series of delightful wonder stories, through which runs a vein of
true wisdom. Miss Browne was blind from infancy, and her writings
stand as the accomplishment of a brave and unselfish woman.


HOLBROOK, FLORENCE.
               The Book of Nature Myths.
               Illustrated by E. Boyd Smith.
               Houghton. .65

     The subject-matter is of permanent value, culled from the
     folk-lore of the primitive races.--_Preface._

We are told The Story of the Earth and the Sky, Why the Bear has a
Short Tail, Why the Cat Always Falls upon Her Feet, and many other
mythical reasons for natural wonders.


KIPLING, RUDYARD.                                                   (p. 52)
               Just So Stories.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Doubleday. 1.20

  "I keep six honest serving-men;
  (They taught me all I knew)
  Their names are What and Where and When
  And How and Where and Who.
  I send them over land and sea,
  I send them east and west;
  But after they have worked for me,
  _I_ give them all a rest.
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  But different folk have different views;
  I know a person small--
  She keeps ten million serving-men,
  Who get no rest at all!
  She sends 'em abroad on her own affairs,
  From the second she opens her eyes--
  One million Hows, two million Wheres,
  And seven million Whys!"

To this small person, Best Beloved, these twelve remarkable tales were
related. We learn how the elephant got his trunk, how the first letter
came to be written, and so forth. There are two editions of the book
at the same price. Most children will prefer the one in large octavo.


MURRAY, HILDA.
               Flower Legends for Children.
               Illustrated by J.S. Eland.
               Longmans. 2.00

Mothers may find the text somewhat advanced for children of seven
years, but the full-page colored pictures are sure to be enjoyed. The
volume is a large oblong one.


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).                                              (p. 53)
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume II.
               Fables and Nursery Tales.
               Heath. .35

     The next step is easy, to the short stories which have been told
     since the world was young; old fables in which the teachings of
     long experience are embodied, legends, fairy tales, which form
     the traditional common stock of the fancies and sentiment of the
     race.--_Preface._


SCUDDER, H.E. (Editor).
               The Book of Legends.
               Houghton. .50

Famous tales, such as King Cophetua, The Wandering Jew, St.
Christopher, and The Seven Sleepers of Ephesus, retold for the
children.


WILSON, G.L.
               Myths of the Red Children.
               Ginn. .45

     The stories are true examples of Indian folk-lore and are very
     old.... Care has been taken to make the drawings archaeologically
     correct for each tribe.--_Foreword._

These traditions of various tribes were gathered from the best
sources, and are here related in simple language. There is a
supplement giving directions for making different articles: a tent,
Indian dress, a bow and arrow, a stone axe, et cetera.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS                                                       (p. 54)

  Most joyful let the Poet be;
  It is through him that all men see.
                                        CHANNING.


BLAISDELL, E.W.
               *The Animals at the Fair.
               Russell. 1.40

Mr. Blaisdell's attractive and amusing illustrations may well serve as
a substitute for the ordinary comic pictures of the newspapers.


WHITTIER, J.G. (Editor).
               Child-Life.
               Houghton. 1.50

Although thirty-seven years have passed since Child-Life was compiled,
it stands now, as then, far ahead of most collections of poetry for
American children. Our own poets are well represented.



RELIGION AND ETHICS

  Loving Jesus, meek and mild,
  Look upon a little child!

  Make me gentle as Thou art,
  Come and live within my heart.

  Take my childish hand in thine,                                   (p. 55)
  Guide these little feet of mine.

  So shall all my happy days
  Sing their pleasant song of praise.
                                        CHARLES WESLEY.


BEALE, H.S. (B.).
               Stories from the Old Testament for Children.
               Duffield. 2.00

These Bible tales are simply told, and follow closely the lines of the
Old Testament, a considerable portion of the narratives being in the
language of Scripture.


MOULTON, R.G. (Editor).
               Children's Series of the Modern Reader's Bible.
               Bible Stories. New Testament.
               Macmillan. .50

     The stories are in the language of Scripture, altered only by
     omissions.... The Revised Version is used, with the frequent
     substitution of the marginal renderings.... In the introductions
     and notes I have carefully avoided any wording which might
     insinuate doctrinal instruction.--_Preface._


MOULTON, R.G. (Editor).
               Children's Series of the Modern Reader's Bible.
               Bible Stories. Old Testament.
               Macmillan. .50

     The stories which make the text are in the language of Scripture,
     altered only by omissions.... The volume is arranged according to
     the natural divisions of Bible history.... Each period is
     represented by its most important stories; the purpose of the
     introduction and notes to each section is to weave all         (p. 56)
     together by indicating briefly the bearing of each story on the
     general history.--_Preface._



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

  O velvet bee, you're a dusty fellow;
  You've powdered your legs with gold!
  O brave marshmary buds, rich and yellow,
  Give me your money to hold!

  O columbine, open your folded wrapper,
  Where two twin turtle-doves dwell!
  O cuckoo-pint, toll me the purple clapper
  That hangs in your clear green bell!

  And show me your nest, with the young ones in it--
  I will not steal it away;
  I am old! you may trust me, linnet, linnet--
  I am seven times one to-day.
                                        JEAN INGELOW.


ANDREWS, JANE.
               The Stories Mother Nature Told Her Children.
               Ginn. .50

     Miss Andrews's books were the pioneers of the great crowd of
     present-day nature-books for young children, and they still
     compare favorably in dignity and true interest with their
     successors.

     Amber, coal, the work of water, and seeds, are among the objects
     in regard to which Mother Nature told her stories.
                                        PRENTICE AND POWER.



STORIES                                                             (p. 57)

     We take it for granted that books for children belong to the easy
     play rather than to the hard work of life, and that they are an
     utter failure if they do not win their way by their own charms.
                                        SAMUEL OSGOOD.


HOPKINS, W.J.
               The Sandman: His Ship Stories.
               Page. 1.50

Simple descriptions of the building of the good ship _Industry_ and
her voyages to the far-away countries in the days long gone.


SEGUR, S. (R.) DE.
               The Story of a Donkey.
               Heath. .20

A translation from the Comtesse de Segur's Memoirs of a Donkey.
Neddy's account of his own life--and he was a good and faithful
beastie who had many adventures--has been a favorite with children for
years.


WARD, M.A. (A.) (Mrs. Humphry Ward).
               Milly and Olly.
               Doubleday. 1.20

This charming story, written many years ago and now revised, tells of
childish holidays spent in the Windemere region. Aunt Emma--a really,
truly old lady, who owns a fascinating parrot--proves a sort of modern
fairy-godmother to the little brother and sister. The atmosphere is
not too pronouncedly English to interfere in the least with our
children's enjoyment.


WHITE, E.O.                                                         (p. 58)
               A Little Girl of Long Ago.
               Houghton. 1.00

The experiences of a little New England girl of eighty years ago,
telling of her return voyage from Scotland, and of her happy life in
Boston and Springfield.


WHITE, E.O.
               When Molly was Six.
               Houghton. 1.00

A pleasant sunny story of the simple happenings in the every-day life
of a small girl.




_EIGHT YEARS OF AGE_                                                (p. 59)

  _And I wrote my happy songs,
  Every child may joy to hear._
                                        BLAKE.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

  By sports like these are all their cares beguil'd,
  The sports of children satisfy the child.
                                        GOLDSMITH.


THE GAMES BOOK FOR BOYS AND GIRLS.
               Dutton. 2.50

Indoor and outdoor games, tricks and puzzles, the making of various
articles, and the care of home pets, are some of the subjects treated
in this volume of old and new pastimes.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT

     The use of history is to give value to the present hour and its
     duty.
                                        EMERSON.


BOUTET DE MONVEL, L.M.
               Joan of Arc.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Century. 3.00

In these truly remarkable pictures, instinct with spirit, dignity, and
pathos, the peasant girl of Domremy, martyr and patron saint, lives (p. 60)
for children. The book is a large oblong one with full-page
illustrations in color. While the text is somewhat advanced for
children of eight years, the pictures really tell, the story.


EGGLESTON, EDWARD.
               Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans.
               American Book. .40

A collection of many noted tales with which all of our children should
be familiar. It includes Franklin's Whistle, Putnam and the Wolf, and
Daniel Boone and his Grapevine Swing.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

     Even John Locke (1632-1704), in his Thoughts on Education (1693),
     recommends, besides the Psalter and the New Testament, AEsop and
     Reynard the Fox, as good food for infant minds. This was an
     excellent basis to start upon.
                                        MONTROSE J. MOSES.


ADVENTURES OF REYNARD THE FOX.
               Edited by W.T. Stead.
               Review. .05

There is no entirely satisfactory edition, for children, of this
classic. The language of one edited by Jacobs seems to the compiler of
this list somewhat unsuited to small people, and E.L. Smythe in her
version substitutes an entirely different ending for that of the    (p. 61)
original. This very inexpensive little book has more than a hundred
interesting small pictures, and children will love to read of bad
Reynard, who is told about in diverting fashion.


AESOP.
               The Fables of AEsop.
               Edited by Joseph Jacobs.
               Illustrated by Richard Heighway.
               Macmillan. 1.50

     It is difficult to say what are and what are not the Fables of
     AEsop.... In the struggle for existence among all these a certain
     number stand out as being the most effective and the most
     familiar. I have attempted to bring most of these into the
     following pages.--_Preface._

     Children cannot read an easier, nor men a wiser book.
                                        THOMAS FULLER.


BROWN, A.F.
               The Book of Saints and Friendly Beasts.
               Houghton. 1.25

These sweet tales of the saints of long ago and their little brothers
the beasts have a gentle influence. The stories include that of Saint
Bridget and the King's Wolf, Saint Fronto's Camels, Saint Rigobert's
Dinner, and Saint Francis of Assisi.


BROWN, A.F.
               In the Days of Giants.
               Illustrated by E. Boyd Smith.
               Houghton. 1.10

The old Norse myths acceptably told.


CARROLL, LEWIS (Pseudonym of C.L. Dodgson).                         (p. 62)
               Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
               Illustrated by John Tenniel.
               Macmillan. 1.00

First told in 1862 to the little Liddell girls. It was written out for
Alice Liddell, was published, and the first copy given to her in 1865.

The illustrations are those which appeared in the original issue. Many
artists have tried their hand in making pictures for "Alice," but none
have succeeded in displacing those of John Tenniel.

Extract from the diary of C.L. Dodgson: July 4, 1862.--I made an
expedition _up_ the river to Godstow with the three Liddells; we had
tea on the bank there, and did not reach Christ Church till half-past
eight.... On which occasion I told them the fairy tale of Alice's
Adventures Underground, which I undertook to write out for Alice.

  "Alice! a childish story take,
  And with a gentle hand
  Lay it where Childhood's dreams are twined
  In Memory's mystic band,
  Like pilgrim's withered wreath of flowers
  Plucked in a far-off land."


CARROLL, LEWIS (Pseudonym of C.L. Dodgson).
               Alice in Wonderland.
               Illustrated by Arthur Rackham.
               Doubleday. 1.40

Those wishing to depart from John Tenniel's illustrations will find (p. 63)
these pictures of Arthur Rackham very interesting. We are given
delightful black and white work, though most of the full-page pictures
are in color.

  Enchanting Alice! Black-and-white
  Has made your deeds perennial;
  And naught save "Chaos and old Night"
  Can part you now from Tenniel;
  But still you are a Type, and based
  In Truth, like Lear and Hamlet;
  And Types may be re-draped to taste
  In cloth of gold or camlet.
                                        AUSTIN DOBSON.


CARROLL, LEWIS (Pseudonym of C.L. Dodgson).
               Through the Looking-Glass.
               Illustrated by John Tenniel.
               Macmillan. 1.00

The sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The illustrations are
the same as those that appeared in the original edition.

  "To the Looking-Glass world it was Alice that said,
  'I've a sceptre in hand, I've a crown on my head.
  Let the Looking-Glass creatures, whatever they be,
  Come and dine with the Red Queen, the White Queen, and me!'"


COLLODI, C. (Pseudonym of Carlo Lorenzini).
               Pinocchio, The Adventures of a Marionette.
               Illustrated by Charles Copeland.
               Ginn. .40

     Of all the fairy stories of Italian literature this is the     (p. 64)
     best known and the best loved.... The Florentines call it a
     literary jewel, and as such it should be known to all young
     readers.--_Preface._

Though children can but dimly comprehend this charming allegory, they
will recognize its truth. Pinocchio, the wayward and mischievous
marionette, through his kindly actions grows to be a real little boy,
with an unselfish loving heart. There are many attractive drawings.


CRUIKSHANK, GEORGE (Illustrator).
               The Cruikshank Fairy Book.
               Putnam. 2.00

Puss in Boots, Jack and the Bean-Stalk, Hop-o'-my-Thumb, and
Cinderella, are the four famous fairy tales pictured by this famous
illustrator.


JUDD, M.C.
               Wigwam Stories.
               Ginn. .75

The book is divided into three parts: Sketches of Various Tribes of
North American Indians; Traditions and Myths; and Stories Recently
Told of Hiawatha and Other Heroes. It is interesting and informing.
There are three sketches by Angel de Cora, and many illustrations from
photographs.


LA FONTAINE, JEAN DE.
               La Fontaine's Fables.
               Translated by Edward Shirley.
               Illustrated by C.M. Park and Rene Bull.
               Nelson. 1.50

An acceptable selection in verse. There are illustrations in color  (p. 65)
as well as in black and white.

  "These fables are much more than they appear--
  The simplest animals are teachers here.
  The bare dull moral weariness soon brings;
  The story serves to give it life and wings."


LANG, ANDREW (Editor).
               The Blue Fairy Book.
               Longmans. 2.00

This first volume of Andrew Lang's colored fairy books contains the
better known tales from the folk-lore of many nations, and is, like
the others of this series, attractively illustrated.

  And when the cuckoo clamours six
  We put away our games and bricks

  And hasten to the shelf where hang
  The books of Mr. Andrew Lang.
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  And when we read the Red, the Blue,
  The Green--small matter what's the hue

  Since joy is there in black and white--
  Remember him who cared to write,

  For little ones, tales old and sweet,
  And ask the fairies (when you meet)

  To always keep unharmed and well
  From ogre's maw and witch's spell,

  From genie's clutch and dragon's fang,
  The kind magician, Andrew Lang!
                                        ST. JOHN LUCAS.


MULOCK, D.M. (Mrs. D.M. (M.) CRAIK).                                (p. 66)
               The Adventures of a Brownie.
               Harper. .60

     "Only I think, if I could be a little child again, I should
     exceedingly like a Brownie to play with me. Should not you?"

We should all say yes, after reading this charming modern fairy story.


MUSSET, PAUL DE.
               Mr. Wind and Madam Rain.
               Illustrated by Charles Bennett.
               Putnam. 2.00

A famous Breton folk-tale which is made additionally attractive by the
unusual quality of the illustrations.

     I will not say that I have added nothing to the unconnected
     recitals of the Breton peasants, ... but I have added only what
     was necessary to link together the different events, and to
     supply passages that were entirely wanting.--_Preface._


PAINE, A.B.
               The Hollow Tree and Deep Woods Book.
               Illustrated by J.M. Conde.
               Harper. 1.50

Mr. Paine writes in his delightful vein of Mr. Coon, Mr. Possum, and
Mr. Crow. The book is always funny, and Mr. Conde's pictures are in
their way as good as the text.


WILLISTON, T.P.
               Japanese Fairy Tales.
               Illustrated by Sanchi Ogawa.
               Rand. .50

These eight wonder stories incidentally illustrate the every-day    (p. 67)
life of the people. The Japanese pictures are reproduced in color.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS.

     So, in this matter of literature for the young, the influence of
     the home teaching is enormous; all the school can do pales before
     it. Let the mother add to the poet's rhyme the music of her soft
     and beloved voice; let great fiction be read to the breathless
     group of curly heads about the fire; and the wonders of science
     be enrolled, the thrilling scenes and splendid personalities of
     history displayed. Children thus inspired may be trusted to
     become sensitive to literature long before they know what the
     word means, or have reasoned at all upon their mental
     experiences.
                                        RICHARD BURTON.


LUCAS, E.V. (Editor).
               A Book of Verses for Children.
               Holt. 2.00

Mr. Lucas has shown his unvarying good taste in compiling this
charming volume. Most of the poems are British, and among them are
many delightful old songs and rhymes, verses of bygone days, ballads,
and carols.


WIGGIN, K.D. (S.), and N.A. SMITH (Editors).
               The Posy Ring.
               Doubleday. 1.25

This admirable collection of poems, chosen from the standpoint of   (p. 68)
childish enjoyment, forms a lane of lovely verse leading into the
great highway of literature. The poems are classified under different
headings such as The Flower Folk, Other Little Children, Playtime,
Story time, and Bedtime.



RELIGION AND ETHICS

  Honest myrth in measure, is a pleasaunt thyng,
  To wryte and to rede well, be gyftes of learnyng;
  Remember this well, all you that be young,
  Exercise vertue, and rule well your toung.
                                        DIVES PRAGMATICUS. _1563._


BUNYAN, JOHN.
               The Pilgrim's Progress.
               Illustrated by the Brothers Rhead.
               Century. 1.50

Children will enjoy the fine illustrations in this soberly bound
volume, whose brown coat is much the color of the one good Pilgrim
wore on the long journey where he led the way for so many earnest
souls.


THE PSALMS OF DAVID.
               With an introductory study by N.D. Hillis.
               Illustrated by Louis Rhead.
               Revell. 2.50

     No David can fall so low but that Christ's mercy and God's love
     can lift him from the depths of selfishness and sin back to the
     throne of manhood and the sceptre of influence.--_Introductory
     Study._

Even young children can grow to love the simpler and more peaceful  (p. 69)
Psalms. The fine full-page pictures in this large well-printed volume
add to its beauty and interest.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

  All things bright and beautiful,
  All creatures great and small,
  All things wise and wonderful,
  The Lord God made them all.

  Each little flower that opens,
  Each little bird that sings,
  He made their glowing colors,
  He made their tiny wings.
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  He gave us eyes to see them,
  And lips that we might tell,
  How great is God Almighty,
  Who hath made all things well.
                                        KEBLE.


AIKEN, JOHN, and A.L. (A.) BARBAULD.
               Eyes and No Eyes, and Other Stories.
               Heath. 20

     "Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, in Over the Teacups, says of the
     story Eyes and No Eyes: I have never seen anything of the kind
     half so good. I advise you, if you are a child anywhere under
     forty-five, and do not yet wear glasses, to send at once for
     Evenings at Home, and read that story. For myself, I am always
     grateful to the writer of it for calling my attention to common
     things."

Eyes and No Eyes, and Travellers' Wonders, from Aiken and Barbauld's
Evenings at Home, The Three Giants, by Mrs. Marcet, and A Curious   (p. 70)
Instrument, by Jane Taylor, are the tales given. They all encourage a
child's powers of observation.


PARSONS, F.T. (S.) (formerly Mrs. W.S. Dana).
               Plants and Their Children.
               American Book. .65

While these elementary talks have been arranged to accompany the
school year, they give so much information about fruits and seeds,
young plants, roots and stems, flowers, et cetera, told in Mrs. Dana's
clear, informing way, that we shall all want our children to know the
book, and to learn the great lesson of how to see, which is taught
them. The many illustrations are helpful.


WEED, C.M.
               Stories of Insect Life. Volume I.
               Ginn. .25

The insects described are the more interesting common forms of Spring
and early Summer. The plain little volume contains twenty short, fully
illustrated chapters.



STORIES

     The fiction which children first hear should be adapted in the
     most perfect manner to the promotion of virtue.
                                        PLATO.


AANRUD, HANS.
               Lisbeth Longfrock.
               Ginn. .65

A vivid description of Norwegian farm and saeter life. Little       (p. 71)
Lisbeth loses her mother and goes to live with the good Kjersti, the
mistress of Hoel Farm, helping to take care of the cattle.

     Hans Aanrud's short stories are considered by his own countrymen
     as belonging to the most original and artistically finished life
     pictures that have been produced by the younger literati of
     Norway.--_Preface._


CAROVE, F.W.
               The Story without an End.
               With a preface by Thomas Wentworth Higginson.
               Heath. .25

     There is a very delightful old story which used to be given to
     children, though I have not seen it for a long time in the hands
     of any children. It was called The Story without an End.
                                        WALTER BESANT.

Written by an eminent German philosopher, and translated by Mrs. Sarah
Austin for her own daughter, this beautiful tale, with its exquisite
language, leads a child into the land of truth and beauty.


PEARY, J. (D.).
               The Snow Baby.
               Stokes. 1.20

An account of Lieutenant Peary's little daughter, who was born amid
the ice and snow of the Polar regions. The book is well illustrated
from photographs.


SNEDDEN, G. (S.).
               Docas, the Indian Boy of Santa Clara.
               Heath. .35

Three phases of Indian life in California, given in the form of a   (p. 72)
story. The ways and customs of the red man are described as they
existed during the early days of this boy, before the coming of the
whites. Later Docas had his home at the Mission in the days of Father
Junipero Serra, and last of all, an old old man, dwelt, with his
children and grandchildren, on a ranch.




_NINE YEARS OF AGE_                                                 (p. 73)

     _Now I like a really good saga, about gods and giants, and the
     fire kingdoms, and the snow kingdoms, and the Aesir making men
     and women out of two sticks, and all that._
                                        KINGSLEY.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

     It is a poor sport that is not worth the candle.
                                        HERBERT.


CANFIELD, DOROTHY, and Others.
               What Shall We Do Now?
               Stokes. 1.50

This book of suggestions for children's games and employments will be
a help to the busy mother when her own supply of indoor and outdoor
amusements is exhausted. There are directions for five hundred plays
and pastimes, including gardening, candy-making, and writing,
guessing, and acting, games.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT

     What we should expect and demand is, that our children should be
     brought up to regard American principles as matters of course;
     and their books should take these principles for granted, and
     illustrate them with all possible interest and power.
                                        SAMUEL OSGOOD.


ANDREWS, JANE.                                                      (p. 74)
               Ten Boys Who Lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now.
               Ginn. .50

This account of the boyhood of ten lads illustrates different periods
and civilizations from Aryan days to the present time.


DRAKE, S.A.
               On Plymouth Rock.
               Lothrop. .60

The narrative of the first two years of the Pilgrims at Plymouth,
based largely on Governor Bradford's history. Maps and illustrations
add to the book's interest.

     I have given as much of Bradford's own story as possible in the
     following pages, interwoven with the relations of Mount and
     Winslow, to which Bradford himself makes frequent
     reference.--_Preface._


GILMAN, ARTHUR.
               The Discovery and Exploration of America.
               Lothrop. .40

     The history of our country naturally divides itself into three
     portions. First, there is the period of Discovery and
     Exploration.... It is with this romantic time that the present
     volume deals.... The latest authorities have been made tributary
     to this volume, and the author has spared no pains to have it
     correct in every statement of facts, and in the difficult matter
     of dates.--_Preface._


GUERBER, H.A.
               The Story of the Greeks.
               American Book. .60

An elementary account of Hellas from legendary times to its         (p. 75)
becoming a Roman province. Many well-known mythical and historic tales
are included. There are maps and illustrations.


GUERBER, H.A.
               The Story of the Romans.
               American Book. .60

This companion to The Story of the Greeks gives, in like manner, a
simple relation of Roman history from mythical days to the fall of the
Empire. It contains maps and illustrations.


HORNE, O.B., and K.L. SCOBEY.
               Stories of Great Artists.
               American Book. .40

Children will find this small book interesting. It tells of the lives
of some of the noted painters of different lands and periods; among
them Raphael, Rembrandt, Reynolds, and Millet. The illustrations are
from famous paintings.


HORNE, O.B., and K.L. SCOBEY.
               Stories of Great Musicians.
               American Book. .40

A companion to Stories of Great Artists, which briefly recounts the
careers of famous musicians; among them Bach, Mozart, Beethoven,
Schumann, and Wagner. Many of the illustrations are from paintings.


SMITH, E.B.
               The Story of Pocahontas and Captain John Smith.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Houghton. 2.50

The brief pathetic life of Powhatan's daughter is well portrayed.   (p. 76)
This large oblong volume contains full-page pictures in color.


STONE, G.L., and M.G. FICKETT.
               Every-Day Life in the Colonies.
               Heath. .35

These short sketches of colonial life picture the first New England
Christmas and a Puritan Sabbath. They also tell of the use of the
hornbook and the sun-dial, describe the making of soap and candles,
and so forth.


WRIGHT, H.C.
               Children's Stories in American History.
               Scribner. 1.25

Although we learn about our country from prehistoric days to the time
of Washington, most of the book is devoted to the early exploration
and settlement of North and South America. The second chapter contains
an account of the Mound-builders.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

     I cannot cease from praising these Japanese. They are truly the
     delight of my heart.
                                        ST. FRANCIS XAVIER.


AYRTON, M.C.
               Child-Life in Japan.
               Heath. .20

     Mrs. Ayrton took a keen interest in the Japanese people and never
     wearied of studying them and their beautiful country....       (p. 77)
     After her return to England, in 1879, she wrote this book.
                                        WILLIAM ELLIOT GRIFFIS.

Our young people will enjoy hearing of the amusements and festivals of
these far-away boys and girls. The volume contains, in addition, child
stories, and an article entitled The Games and Sports of Japanese
Children, by W.E. Griffis.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

  Where the bee sucks, there suck I:
  In a cowslip's bell I lie;
  There I couch when owls do cry.
  On the bat's back I do fly
  After summer merrily.
  Merrily, merrily shall I live now,
  Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
                                        SHAKSPERE.


ANDERSEN, H.C.
               Stories.
               Houghton. .60

The tales in this excellent little edition are well chosen.

     A prime advantage in an early acquaintance with Andersen springs
     from the stimulus which his quaint fancy gives to the budding
     imagination of childhood. It may be said without exaggeration
     that Andersen truly represents creative childhood in literature.
                                        H.E. SCUDDER.


ASBJOeRNSEN, P.C.
               Fairy Tales from the Far North.
               Translated by H.L. Braekstad.
               Nutt. 2.00

     "The author, a distinguished Norwegian student of folk-lore    (p. 78)
     and zooelogy, made long journeys on foot for scientific purposes,
     in the course of which he collected, among others, these popular
     stories and legends. Mr. Braekstad in his translation endeavors
     to retain the atmosphere of the original."


FRANCILLON, R.E.
               Gods and Heroes.
               Ginn. .40

     It will be seen that the Mythology adopted throughout is strictly
     of the old-fashioned kind which goes to Ovid as its leading
     authority, and ignores the difference between the gods of Greece
     and the gods of Rome.--_Preface._

This small volume is included because it gives quite fully the Labors
of Hercules.


FRERE, MARY.
               Old Deccan Days.
               McDonough. 1.25

Hindoo fairy legends of Southern India, recorded by Miss Frere in
1865-1866, as they were related to her by her Indian _ayah_ during a
tour through the Southern Mahratta country, in the Bombay Presidency,
of which Sir Bartle Frere, her father, was then Governor.


GRIMM, J.L. and W.K.
               Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm.
               Translated by Mrs. Edgar Lucas.
               Illustrated by Arthur Rackham.
               Lippincott. 1.50

Barring a few horrible incidents, this is an excellent selection of
these famous stories. Mr. Rackham's illustrations help to place the
edition above many others.


GRIMM, J.L. and W.K.                                                (p. 79)
               German Household Tales.
               Houghton. .60

With very few exceptions, an unusually wise choice of the Tales.

     Grimm was the name of two German brothers.... Their studies they
     carried on together, though Jacob was the more learned, and made
     great contributions to the science of language, while Wilhelm was
     more artistic in his tastes and was a capital story-teller....
     They lived in the province of Hesse-Cassel, ... and it was from
     the peasants in this province that they derived a great many
     tales. The best friend they had was the wife of a cowherd, a
     woman of about fifty, who had a genius for story-telling.
                                        H.E. SCUDDER.


HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL.
               A Wonder Book.
               Illustrated by Walter Crane.
               Houghton. 3.00

     No epoch of time can claim a copyright in these immortal fables.
     They seem never to have been made; and certainly, so long as man
     exists, they can never perish.--_Preface._

Hawthorne wrote comparatively little for children. Let us be thankful
that he did retell with such charm these Greek myths. The full-page
pictures in color are worthy of the stories, which comprise The
Gorgon's Head, The Golden Touch, The Paradise of Children, The Three
Golden Apples, The Miraculous Pitcher, and The Chimaera.


HOLBROOK, FLORENCE.
               Northland Heroes.
               Houghton. .60

     For centuries the songs of Homer ... have delighted the        (p. 80)
     children, young and old, of many lands. But part of our own
     heritage, and nearer to us in race and time, are these stories of
     the Danish Beowulf and the Swedish Fridthjof.--_Preface._

These simple versions of saga and epic recount for our children the
bravery and endurance of a ruder age.


HOUGHTON, L. (S.).
               The Russian Grandmother's Wonder Tales.
               Illustrated by W.T. Benda.
               Scribner. 1.50

     Slavonic folk-stories told by a Russian peasant to her little
     grandson, with the village life of Southern Russia as a
     background. Based on Dr. Frederich Kraus's German collection of
     Tales and Legends of South Slavonia.
                                        NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY.

Children will love to dwell for a time in Russia with the boy who was
always saying "Tell me a story, little grandmamma." The character of
the grandmother is drawn in a measure from that of Dr. Kraus's peasant
mother, who was, though illiterate, intelligent and learned in the
wonder-lore of her people.


JACOBS, JOSEPH (Editor).
               Celtic Fairy Tales.
               Illustrated by J.D. Batten.
               Putnam. 1.25

     I have endeavored to include in this volume the best and most
     typical stories told by the chief masters of the Celtic
     folk-tale, Campbell, Kennedy, Hyde, and Curtin, and to these I
     have added the best tales scattered elsewhere.... In making    (p. 81)
     my selection, and in all doubtful points of treatment, I have had
     resource to the wide knowledge of my friend Mr. Alfred Nutt in all
     branches of Celtic folk-lore.... With him by my side I could
     venture into regions where the non-Celt wanders at his own
     risk.--_Preface._

The charm and humor of Celtic tradition is conveyed to the reader.


JACOBS, JOSEPH (Editor).
               Indian Fairy Tales.
               Illustrated by J.D. Batten.
               Putnam. 1.75

     From all these sources--from the Jatakas, from the Bidpai, and
     from the more recent collections--I have selected those stories
     which throw most light on the origin of fable and folk-tales, and
     at the same time are most likely to attract English
     children.--_Preface._


KEARY, ANNIE and ELIZA.
               The Heroes of Asgard.
               Macmillan. .50

This is a rather unattractive little volume, but the myths are so well
told that we feel while reading them that real events of heroic days
are being recounted.


KINGSLEY, CHARLES.
               The Heroes.
               Illustrated by M.H. Squire and E. Mars.
               Russell. 2.50

In these Greek tales Kingsley is at his best for children. He writes
without digression, the language is clear and dignified, and we feel
the spirit of the bygone age of which the story tells. Many of the
illustrations are in color.


KINGSLEY, CHARLES.                                                  (p. 82)
               The Water-Babies. A Fairy Tale for a Land-Baby.
               Illustrated by Linley Sambourne.
               Macmillan. 1.25

This original and charming story is in some parts rather over the
heads of children, and a few of the incidents seem gruesome to the
compiler. For this reason it is better to read the book to the child,
so that these portions may be omitted.


LAGERLOeF, S.O.L.
               The Wonderful Adventures of Nils.
               Doubleday. 1.50

Selma Lagerloef, the foremost writer of Swedish fiction, in response to
a commission to prepare a reader for the public schools, devoted three
years to nature study, and to seeking out hitherto unpublished
folk-lore and legends of the different provinces. The result, of which
we have as yet only the first volume, is this remarkable book. Bad
cruel Nils is transformed into an elf, and on the back of a
goosey-gander, Thumbietot, as he is now called, visits distant
regions, and learns kindness to his animal brothers.


LANG, ANDREW (Editor).
               The Red Fairy Book.
               Longmans. 2.00

In this volume, second in order of publication, less familiar fairy
stories are given, including The Twelve Dancing Princesses, Kari
Woodengown, and Mother Holle.


MULOCK, D.M. (Mrs. D.M. (M.) CRAIK).                                (p. 83)
               @The Little Lame Prince.
               Heath. .30

     The story of Prince Dolor of Nomansland who floated out of
     Hopeless Tower on the wonderful traveling cloak of Imagination.
     An allegorical tale teaching patience and true kingship.
                                        PRENTICE AND POWER.

This beautiful wonder story, because of its pathos, should perhaps be
withheld from a very sensitive child.


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume III. Fairy Tales, Ballads,
               and Poems.
               Heath. .40

     These naturally serve as the gate of entrance into the wide open
     fields of literature, especially into those of poetry. Poetry is
     one of the most efficient means of education of the moral
     sentiment, as well as of the intelligence. It is the source of
     the best culture.--_Preface._


PAINE, A.B.
               *The Arkansaw Bear.
               Illustrated by Frank Verbeck.
               Altemus. 1.00

The altogether charmingly impossible story of the travels of a little
boy and a bear who played the violin.

  "And they travelled on forever and they'll never, never sever,
  Bosephus and the fiddle and the old black bear."


PYLE, HOWARD.                                                       (p. 84)
               The Wonder Clock.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Harper. 2.00

Any undertaking of Mr. Pyle's is a guarantee of distinction in
material, style, and production, and these four and twenty fairy
tales, one for each hour of the day, are no exception. The
illustrations are among the author's best, and Miss Katharine Pyle
supplies charming little verses for the different hours.


VALENTINE, L. (J.) (Editor).
               The Old, Old Fairy Tales.
               Warne. 1.50

     The tales contained in this volume have been the delight of many
     generations of children, and can, in fact, claim a very distant
     origin, though they were retold in their present form as late as
     the age of Louis XIV. They are generally supposed to have come
     from the East, for they are to be found in varied forms in all
     the countries of Europe that sent forth Crusaders.... As children
     always like stories to be retold in the same words as far as
     possible, these tales have not been rewritten (except in two
     cases); the original translations in their quaint simplicity have
     been collected, and merely corrected so far as to meet the modern
     ideas of the kind of tale to be given to children; the old ones
     being occasionally a little coarse.--_Preface._

Madame D'Aulnoy, Charles Perrault, and La Princess de Beaumont, are
represented in this collection, taken, with few exceptions, from
French sources.


ZITKALA-SA.                                                         (p. 85)
               Old Indian Legends.
               Illustrated by Angel de Cora.
               Ginn. .50

     Under an open sky, nestling close to the earth, the old Dakota
     story-tellers have told me these legends.--_Preface._



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS

     The great man is he who does not lose his child's heart.
                                        MENCIUS.


LONGFELLOW, H.W.
               The Song of Hiawatha.
               Illustrated by Frederic Remington.
               Houghton. 2.00

  "Ye who love a nation's legends,
   Love the ballads of a people
   That like voices from afar off
   Call to us to pause and listen,
   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  "Listen to this Indian Legend,
   To this Song of Hiawatha!"


LUCAS, E.V. (Editor).
               Another Book of Verses for Children.
               Macmillan. 1.50

     Admirable selections, chosen partly with view to reading aloud, a
     large proportion not being found in other children's           (p. 86)
     anthologies. They range from Shakspere, Blake, Tennyson, to
     modern nonsense rhymes. Attractively illustrated.
                                        NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY.



RELIGION AND ETHICS

  What can I give Him,
  Poor as I am?
  If I were a shepherd
  I would bring a lamb,
  If I were a wise man
  I would do my part--
  Yet what I can I give Him,
  Give my heart.
                                        C.G. ROSSETTI.


HODGES, GEORGE.
               When the King Came.
               Houghton. 1.25

The life of Christ told with simplicity and breadth, making real to
children the events of the Gospel story. Tested by ten years' home use
before publication. The biblical text is not adhered to strictly.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

  I love to rise in a summer morn,
  When the birds sing on every tree;
  The distant huntsman winds his horn,
  And the skylark sings with me:
  O what sweet company!
                                        BLAKE.


CHAMPLIN, J.D.                                                      (p. 87)
               The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Common Things.
               Holt. 3.00

     In the present work the writer has attempted to furnish in simple
     language, aided by pictorial illustrations when thought
     necessary, a knowledge of things in Nature, Science, and the
     Arts, which are apt to awaken a child's curiosity.--_Preface._

Young people thoroughly enjoy this excellent book.


MILLER, O.T. (Pseudonym of Mrs. H. (M.) MILLER).
               The First Book of Birds.
               Houghton. 1.00

     Intended to interest children in birds by an account of their
     habits of eating, sleeping, nesting, etc., with illustrative
     anecdotes, many from original observation.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.

Though Mrs. Miller is herself an expert, she tells us that she has
been careful to have the latest and the best authorities for the
statements made, and presents a list of them. The author, while never
a sentimentalist, constantly teaches kindness to the birds. There are
both colored and plain plates.


MORLEY, M.W.
               The Bee People.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               McClurg. 1.25

Miss Apis Mellifica, with her wonderful eyes, her queer tongue, her
useful furry legs, and her marvellous ways, is described for us in  (p. 88)
delightfully simple fashion by Miss Morley, who has also made many
instructive and interesting small illustrations. The last chapter is
on Bombus, the Bumblebee.

  The bee has a mighty soul in a little body.
                                        _Virgil._


MURTFELDT, M.E., and C.M. WEED.
               Stories of Insect Life. Volume II.
               Ginn. .30

     "This book, like its predecessor, aims to give to young pupils an
     accurate and readable account of the life histories of some
     common insects. It is designed for use during the autumn months."

There are many illustrations.


SAUNDERS, M.M.
               Beautiful Joe.
               American Baptist. .50

Primarily intended to inculcate kindness to dogs, and other animals.
It is pleasant to know that the tale has secured an immense
popularity.


SEWELL, ANNA.
               Black Beauty.
               Edited by E.R. Shaw.
               Newson. .30

The horse gives his own account of his life with good and bad masters;
the purpose of the book being to instil care and consideration for
animals. Many copies have been distributed among draymen and cabmen.
Children find the story very interesting.



STORIES                                                             (p. 89)

     Consult the taste of your child in selecting or guiding his
     reading.... Let the boys and girls choose for themselves within
     certain limits, only trying to guide them to the best books upon
     the subject of their interest, whatever that may be.
                                                     Mrs. G.R. FIELD.


BURNETT, F.E. (H.).
               Little Lord Fauntleroy.
               Scribner. 1.25

Mrs. Burnett's well-known story of the little American boy who in the
course of events becomes heir to an English earldom is included in
this list because of the beautiful and kindly spirit shown by the
child to those about him.


DRUMMOND, HENRY.
               *The Monkey That Would Not Kill.
               Illustrated by Louis Wain.
               Dodd. 1.00

Professor Drummond wrote these two tales--his first attempt at
fiction--while acting as temporary editor of a children's magazine.
The first, that of Tricky, was so liked by children all over the world
that the second, Gum, was written soon after. Mr. Wain's pictures are
very good.


JEWETT, S.O.
               Play Days.
               Houghton. 1.50

     This little book for little girls has all the quiet charm of Miss
     Jewett's books for older people. The author has a great gift for
     making the fine and beautiful things which lie at the heart    (p. 90)
     of every-day life stand forth in their true colors, and making
     simple pleasures seem very pleasant.
                                        PRENTICE AND POWER.


LUCAS, E.V. (Editor).
               Old-Fashioned Tales.
               Illustrated by F.D. Bedford.
               Stokes. 1.50

Selections from the writings of Maria Edgeworth, Mary Lamb, Peter
Parley, and others.

  "The children come, the children go;
  To-day grows quickly yesterday;
  And we, who quiz quaint fashions so,
  We soon shall seem as quaint as they."

     The children of those days--our great-great-grandfathers--expected
     didacticism. It was part of the game.... In the present collection
     there is, I think, no example either of condescension or
     showing-off--the two principal faults of books for children. All the
     authors seem to me to be simple and single-minded: they wished
     above all to be interesting.--_Introduction._


McINTYRE, M.A.
               The Cave Boy of the Age of Stone.
               Appleton. .40

     Written in accordance with modern views of science, and
     calculated to give children a good idea of prehistoric man and
     his ways. What is more, the story is sufficiently interesting to
     attract them.--_The Athenaeum._


OTIS, JAMES (Pseudonym of J.O. Kaler).
               Toby Tyler, or Ten Weeks with a Circus.
               Harper. .60

Little freckled Toby runs away and joins a circus, where he makes a (p. 91)
friend of Mr. Stubbs, an old monkey. Before long, however, he is glad
to be welcomed home again by old Uncle Daniel. The tawdry life of the
ring is well drawn.


OUIDA (Pseudonym of Louise de la Rame).
               Bimbi.
               Lippincott. 1.50

Louise de la Rame wrote these stories in a way that charms alike grown
people and children. Little August and his beloved Hirschvogel the
great Nuernberg stove, Florentine Lolo and his faithful Moufflou,
Raphael the child of old Urbino, and others, are vividly pictured.




_TEN YEARS OF AGE_                                                  (p. 92)

     _There comes a voice that awakes my soul. It is the voice of
     years that are gone, they roll before me with their deeds._
                                        OSSIAN.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

     Where's the cook? is supper ready, the house trimmed, rushes
     strewed, cobwebs swept?
                                        SHAKSPERE.


BENTON, C.F.
               A Little Cook-Book for a Little Girl.
               Estes. .75

"But Margaret said, 'I don't want to wait till I'm big; I want to cook
now; and I don't want to do cooking-school cooking, but little girl
cooking, all by myself.'"

So they gave her this simple cook-book on her birthday, and she
learned to make all the different dishes before another birthday came.


BENTON, C.F.
               Saturday Mornings.
               Estes. .75

Margaret loved housekeeping, and the big people taught her on Saturday
mornings how to take care of the house and its contents, how to
launder, to market, et cetera. The directions, given in story form,
are very clear and simple, and girls greatly enjoy the book. In fact,
work becomes as joyful as play.


HALL, A.N.                                                          (p. 93)
               The Boy Craftsman.
               Lothrop. 2.00

     The Boy Craftsman has been undertaken with a view of helping boys
     with their problems of earning money, as well as furnishing
     recreative and entertaining work, and to this end the first
     portion has been devoted to suggestions for the carrying on of a
     number of small business enterprises, and the second and third
     parts to outdoor and indoor pastimes for all seasons of the
     year.--_Preface._

The handling and care of tools, simple carpentry, printing,
photography, the making of an outdoor gymnasium and a miniature
theatre, are among the topics included. There are many illustrations.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT

  "Here may we sit and converse hold
  With those whose names in ages old
  Were in the book of fame enrolled."


BROOKS, E.S.
               The True Story of Christopher Columbus.
               Lothrop. 1.50

     Columbus ... left a record of persistence in spite of
     discouragement and of triumph over all obstacles, that has been
     the inspiration and guide for Americans ever since his
     day.--_Preface._

The life of the great admiral is described in a simple and interesting
manner. Many pictures are given.


BROOKS, E.S.                                                        (p. 94)
               The True Story of George Washington.
               Lothrop. 1.50

     One of the best of modern Americans, James Russell Lowell, who
     was born on the same day of the month as Washington, February
     twenty-second, wrote, shortly before his death, to a school-girl
     whose class proposed noticing his own birthday: "Whatever else
     you do on the twenty-second of February, recollect, first of all,
     that on that day a really great man was born, and do not fail to
     warm your hearts with the memory of his service, and to brace
     your minds with the contemplation of his character. The rest of
     us must wait uncovered till he be served."

     This is a good text for those boys and girls who may be led to
     read this true story of George Washington.--_Preface._

The book is fully illustrated.


CATHERWOOD, M. (H.).
               The Heroes of the Middle West.
               Ginn. .50

The French discovery and settlement of this country to the time of
Pontiac, and the coming of the English. A vivid, carefully drawn
picture of those adventurous days. Marquette, Joliet, La Salle, and
Tonty, are sketched for us.


CHAMPLIN, J.D.
               The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Persons and Places.
               Holt. 3.00

A companion to The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Common Things, which
tells, in the same simple way, of well-known persons and places. It
is, as is the former, most satisfactory. There are many illustrations.


GILMAN, ARTHUR.                                                     (p. 95)
               The Colonization of America.
               Lothrop. .45

     This volume, like The Discovery and Exploration of America, of
     which it is a continuation, is a study of the best authorities.
     It is intended to present to young readers the salient points in
     the story of the colonization of the United States.--_Preface._


HILL, MABEL.
               Lessons for Junior Citizens.
               Introduction by A.B. Hart.
               Ginn. .50

By this series of talks about the make-up and workings of different
civic departments and institutions Miss Hill arouses the attention and
holds the interest of our children. The police, fire, and street
departments, are described, and among other subjects, juvenile courts,
the school system, and the village improvement association, are
pleasantly discussed.


McMURRY, C.A.
               Pioneers of the Rocky Mountains and the West.
               Macmillan. .40

A good account of the exploring expeditions of Coronado, Lewis and
Clark, Fremont, Powell, Parkman, and others. The book contains maps
and illustrations.


MARSHALL, H.E.
               An Island Story.
               Illustrated by A.S. Forrest.
               Stokes. 2.50

     The child is to put this volume, not at the lesson-book end of
     the shelf, but with Robinson Crusoe and the like. So the preface
     suggests, and rightly. It is eminently readable, a success,    (p. 96)
     we should say, in what looks much easier than it is, telling a
     story in simple words.--_The Spectator._

A history of the Mother Country, from earliest legendary times
delightfully related. The thirty full-page illustrations in color add
to its attraction.


MARSHALL, H.E.
               Stories of William Tell and His Friends.
               Dutton. .50

The Swiss national hero is told of in a series of thrilling
narratives, teaching children what brave men will dare and do for
freedom. There are eight pictures in color.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

  So geographers, in Afric maps,
  With savage pictures fill their gaps,
  And o'er unhabitable downs
  Place elephants for want of towns.
                                        SWIFT.


DU CHAILLU, P.B.
               The Country of the Dwarfs.
               Harper. 1.25

The author relates in his informal way, among many other experiences,
his encounters with the little people of Herodotus; their tiny houses,
curious customs, and uncommon shyness. This trip to Africa was begun
in 1863.


DU CHAILLU, P.B.                                                    (p. 97)
               Wild Life under the Equator.
               Harper. 1.25

The hunting of hippopotami and gorillas is most interestingly narrated
by the great explorer who also tells about the method employed in
catching elephants, about snake-charming, and so forth.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.
               Switzerland.
               Illustrated by J.H. Lewis and A.D. McCormick.
               Macmillan. .75

These small books--the Peeps at Many Lands Series--"are intended to
give children a glimpse at the scenes, people, and characteristics, of
foreign countries.... A strong feature is made of the work and play of
children in the land described." The illustrations, though as a rule
somewhat highly colored, are very attractive. There are many titles in
the series, but only the most important are included in this list.
Besides descriptions of beautiful lakes and great mountains, this
volume includes tales of the struggle for Swiss freedom, accounts of
mountain-climbing, sports, and chamois-hunting. There are twelve
colored plates, among which are a number of fine snow scenes.


SCHWATKA, FREDERICK.
               The Children of the Cold.
               Educational. 1.25

Frederick Schwatka says: To describe these Arctic babies is the main
object of this book--to tell the boys and girls what kind of toys   (p. 98)
and pleasures and picnics and all sorts of fun may be had where you
would hardly think any could be had at all; also, some of the
discomforts of living in this most uncomfortable country.


TAYLOR, BAYARD.
               Boys of Other Countries.
               Putnam. 1.25

Experiences in the lives of five boys, whose respective homes were
Sweden, Egypt, Iceland, Germany, and Russia.

The purpose of the author, of course, was to give a glimpse of the
habits and customs of these countries.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

     It would be hard to estimate the amount of gentleness and mercy
     that has made its way among us through these slight channels.
     Forbearance, courtesy, consideration for the poor and aged, kind
     treatment of animals, the love of Nature, abhorrence of tyranny
     and brute force--many such good things have been nourished in the
     child's heart by this powerful aid. It has greatly helped to keep
     us ever young, by preserving through our worldly ways one slender
     track, not overgrown with weeds, where we may walk with children,
     sharing their delights.
                                        DICKENS.


ANDERSEN, H.C.
               Fairy Tales from Hans Christian Andersen.
               Translated by Mrs. Edgar Lucas.
               Illustrated by Thomas, Charles, and William Robinson.
               Dutton. 2.50

     Most truly rendered in the edition by Mrs. E. Lucas,           (p. 99)
     illustrated by the Robinsons.
                                        Mrs. H.L. ELMENDORF.

Mrs. Lucas is well fitted for her office of translator, although there
are a number of tales in this selection which, in the opinion of the
compiler of this List, might well have been omitted because of their
horrible character. The pictures are so remarkable that in them the
stories live again.


BALDWIN, JAMES.
               A Story of the Golden Age.
               Illustrated by Howard Pyle.
               Scribner. 1.50

Mr. Baldwin's object, as he tells us, has been to pave the way to the
enjoyable reading of Homer. He has depicted for us the boyhood and
youth of Odysseus, taking the various legends relating to the causes
of the Trojan War, and weaving them into one continuous narrative,
ending where Homer begins.


CHAPIN, A.A.
               The Story of the Rhinegold.
               Harper. 1.25

A little volume intended for the use of children who may be taken to
hear the operas of Richard Wagner. It gives briefly, in an interesting
manner, the great myth upon which Wagner based his famous production,
the Ring of the Nibelungs, following the lines of the operas. The
musical motifs accompany the text.


CHAPIN, A.A.                                                       (p. 100)
               Wonder Tales from Wagner.
               Harper. 1.25

This companion to The Story of the Rhinegold relates the legends of
the Flying Dutchman, Tannhaeuser, Lohengrin, Tristan and Isolde, and
the Mastersingers of Nuremberg. The musical motifs accompany the text.


DIXON, E. (Editor).
               Fairy Tales from the Arabian Nights.
               Illustrated by J.D. Batten.
               Putnam. 2.50

     In Europe they were not known till 1704, when a learned
     Frenchman, Antoine Galland, who had travelled widely in the East,
     put them skillfully, if not too accurately, into the language of
     his own people.... Within a comparatively few years, an ancient
     manuscript in the Louvre at Paris has been found to remove from
     Galland the long-standing reproach that he introduced into his
     Arabian Nights stories which really did not belong to the
     collection, but were taken from other Eastern sources.... It will
     not be easy to change the form of the names which, through
     Galland's agency, have become classic words.--_Introduction to
     Stories from the Arabian Nights._

     The text of the present selection from the Arabian Nights is that
     of Galland, 1821, slightly abridged and edited. The edition is
     designed virginibus puerisque.
                                        E. DIXON.

Mr. Dixon presents these famous Oriental stories most acceptably, and
Mr. Batten's remarkable illustrations are all that can be desired. His
genii are genii indeed, and his fairy princesses creatures of grace
and beauty.


HARRIS, J.C.                                                       (p. 101)
               *Uncle Remus; His Songs and His Sayings.
               Illustrated by A.B. Frost.
               Appleton. 2.00

     I have endeavored to give to the whole a genuine flavor of the
     old plantation. Each legend has its variants, but in every
     instance I have retained that particular version which seemed to
     me to be the most characteristic, and have given it without
     embellishment and without exaggeration.--_Introduction._

All children should have the opportunity to know and to love Uncle
Remus, as they cannot fail to do if they are familiar with his
narratives. The Negro dialect often makes it desirable to have these
read aloud.


HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL.
               Tanglewood Tales.
               Houghton. .75

In this second Wonder Book Hawthorne again tells us in simple language
of great heroes of Greek mythical days. The Minotaur, the Pygmies, The
Dragon's Teeth, Circe's Palace, The Pomegranate Seeds, and The Golden
Fleece, comprise the contents of the volume.


HODGSON, GERALDINE.
               Rama and the Monkeys.
               Illustrated by W.H. Robinson.
               Macmillan. .50

In fine and picturesque language, retained from the Indian original,
Geraldine Hodgson has given us this adaptation from the Ramayana. We
learn, with delight, to know the monkey hosts: "Hanuman, that strong,
forgiving, wise, brave, and humble Ape," and "Sugriva, that best   (p. 102)
of Monkeys."


KIPLING, RUDYARD.
               The Jungle Book.
               Century. 1.50

Telling of Mowgli, the child of the jungle, and his brethren, the wild
creatures of the forest; together with other marvellous animal
stories.

  "Oh, hear the call!--Good hunting all
  That keep the Jungle Law!"


LANG, ANDREW (Editor).
               The Green Fairy Book.
               Longmans. 2.00

This, the third of the colored fairy books, contains, as do the
others, tales from many sources, among them The Half-Chick, The Magic
Swan, and King Kojata.


PYLE, HOWARD.
               The Story of King Arthur and His Knights.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Scribner. 2.50

Mr. Pyle has related these great legends right worthily. The
illustrations are full of interest, and while the text is suited to a
narrative of this early period, it is well within childish
comprehension.

  Blow trumpet, for the world is white with May;
  Blow trumpet, the long night hath roll'd away!
  Blow thro' the living world--"Let the King reign."

  "Shall Rome or Heathen rule in Arthur's realm?
  Flash brand and lance, fall battleaxe upon helm,
  Fall battleaxe, and flash brand! Let the King reign."
                                        TENNYSON.


RUSKIN, JOHN.                                                      (p. 103)
               The King of the Golden River.
               Heath. .20

An exquisite legend, beautiful in spirit and language.

     There have been written in our English language a few tales
     bearing a rich moral lesson that are an unfailing source of
     delight, alike to childhood and to youth, and that are at the
     same time not without interest to the adult. The King of the
     Golden River is one of these.... Its lessons are not obtruded;
     the reader is really not explicitly conscious of them at
     all.--_Introduction._


STOCKTON, F.R.
               Fanciful Tales.
               Scribner. .50

Mr. Stockton had a wise, humorous style of his own. In this small
volume, which contains some of his best writing for children, will be
found Old Pipes and the Dryad, The Bee-Man of Orn, and The Clocks of
Rondaine.


STORIES FROM THE ARABIAN NIGHTS.
               Houghton. .60

     From centuries and peoples almost as different from those we know
     as the North and the South Poles are far apart, through the
     overthrows of dynasties and the movements of whole races of men,
     by the work of Arabian scholars when printing was unknown, and by
     the labors of Europeans almost in our own day, these stories have
     survived to transport us into a world of splendor and
     magic.--_Introduction._

A carefully edited selection of thirteen of these famous tales, with
which, of course, every child should be familiar.


THACKERAY, W.M.                                                    (p. 104)
               The Rose and the Ring.
               Edited by E.E. Hale.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Heath. .25

     But in the meanwhile, and for a brief holiday, let us laugh and
     be as pleasant as we can. And you elder folks--a little joking
     and dancing and fooling will do even you no harm. The author
     wishes you a Merry Christmas, and welcomes you to the Fireside
     Pantomime.
                                        M.A. TITMARSH.

This fairy extravaganza--Thackeray's only production for children--was
written for a little sick girl.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS.

     Children are lucky to be children nowadays, for the idea is
     pretty well disseminated that the very choicest from all the
     garnered riches of the great world of literature should be given
     them, that they may early be possessed of thoughts and feelings
     that are true and large, sweet and beautiful.
                                        RICHARD BURTON.


GAYLEY, C.M., and M.C. FLAHERTY (Editors).
               Poetry of the People.
               Ginn. .50

     Poems illustrative of the history and national spirit of England,
     Scotland, Ireland, and America.--_Title-Page._

The compilers have given us a volume of verse chosen from that     (p. 105)
which is "most simple, most hearty, most truly characteristic of
the people, their tradition, history, and spirit; ... poetry sometimes
by, and sometimes not, but always for, the people; poems that were
household words with our fathers and mothers, and lay close to the
heart because _of_ the heart."


HAWEIS, M.E. (Mrs. H.R. HAWEIS).
               Chaucer for Children.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Scribner. 1.25

Mrs. Haweis begins with an account of Chaucer's life and the London of
his day. Portions of a number of the Tales follow, the original and
the modern text being given in parallel columns, with prose
abridgments connecting the selections. There are eight full-page
colored pictures and a number of small woodcuts. Though possibly only
an exceptional child will enjoy the book, it helps to bring the
youthful reader closer to the time of Chaucer than any other version
for children.


RASPE, R.E.
               *Tales from the Travels of Baron Munchausen.
               Edited by E.E. Hale.
               Heath. .20

     "Some travellers are apt to advance more than is strictly true;
     if any of the company entertain a doubt of my veracity, I shall
     only say to such, I pity their want of faith."

     Raspe was scholar enough to mix up with the real Munchausen's (p. 106)
     amusing burlesques, exaggerations and fancies which are centuries
     older, and which can be cited now from the crabbed language of
     the Middle Ages.--_Note._


SWIFT, JONATHAN.
               Gulliver's Travels.
               Educational. .40

His voyage to Lilliput, his stay with the little people, and his
adventures later among the giants of Brobdingnag, are classic. Written
as a political satire, the narrative has served a gentler purpose than
its original one. The littleness of the Lilliputians and the greatness
of the giants appeal strongly to children.

  And lo! the book from all its end beguiled,
  A harmless wonder to some happy child.
                                        BULWER-LYTTON.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

  In that forest to and fro
  I can wander, I can go;
  See the spider and the fly,
  And the ants go marching by
  Carrying parcels with their feet
  Down the green and grassy street.
                                        STEVENSON.


DUNCAN, FRANCES.
               Mary's Garden and How It Grew.
               Century. 1.25

The old gardener teaches Mary how to prepare and tend her garden   (p. 107)
through the year. Much practical information is given in a charming
way with a thread of story.


HERRICK, S.M. (B.).
               The Earth in Past Ages.
               American Book. .60

A clear account of the geological story, interestingly told. Many of
the illustrations are taken from Lyell, and Winchell.


MILLER, O.T. (Pseudonym of Mrs. H. (M.) MILLER).
               The Second Book of Birds.
               Houghton. 1.00

     Illustrated with colored and plain plates.... Systematically
     arranged; non-technical descriptions. This takes the learner a
     step farther than The First Book, and introduces him to
     classification, giving examples of the best known species, east,
     west, and south, of thirty families of land-birds, with account
     of habits, and illustrative anecdotes. An appendix contains a
     simple non-technical characterization of the several families, in
     language a child can understand.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.


PATTERSON, A.J.
               The Spinner Family.
               Illustrated by Bruce Horsfall.
               McClurg. 1.25

Children, while they do not like spiders, are invariably curious about
them. This description of various species, with its good
illustrations, will turn childish curiosity into genuine interest.


WOOD, THEODORE.                                                    (p. 108)
               A Natural History for Young People.
               Dutton. 2.50

In moderate compass this book gives us much information about the
living creatures of the world. Mr. Wood is an authority. There are
twelve colored and over three hundred black-and-white illustrations.


WRIGHT, M.O.
               Gray Lady and the Birds.
               Macmillan. 1.75

Although as a rule story-telling and science are best kept separate,
their combination in this pleasant tale, written in the interest of
bird-protection, can have only our hearty commendation. It arouses the
interest of children not only by its style, but because there is such
a fund of information about our birds. The volume contains twelve
colored plates and thirty-six full-page illustrations in half-tone.



STORIES

  Oh for a Booke and a shadie nooke,
  Eyther in-a-doore or out,
  With the greene leaves whisp'ring overhede,
  Or the Streete cryes all about.
  Where I maie Reade all at my ease,
  Both of the Newe and Olde,
  For a jollie goode Booke, whereon to looke,
  Is better to me than Golde.
                                        _Old English Song._


ALCOTT, L.M.                                                       (p. 109)
               Under the Lilacs.
               Illustrated by Alice Barber Stephens.
               Little. 2.00

The story tells how little Ben and good Sancho, his wonderful trained
poodle, ran away from the circus, and found refuge and happiness with
Bab and Betty in the old home under the lilacs.


BAYLOR, F.C. (Mrs. F.C. (B.) BELGER).
               Juan and Juanita.
               Houghton. 1.50

This account of the capture of Juan and Juanita by Comanches is
founded on fact. A number of years ago two Mexican children were
discovered by Indians on the other side of the Rio Grande, and carried
away to the Llanos Estacados. After four years of captivity they made
their escape, walking back three hundred miles through a wild country,
and finally reaching their mother. The tale gives an interesting
picture of hacienda life.


BOYESEN, H.H.
               The Modern Vikings.
               Scribner. 1.25

The author originally related these narratives of life and sport in
the Norseland to his own children.

  "For my Vikings love song and saga,
  Like their conquering fathers of old;
  And these are some of the stories
  To the three little tyrants I told."


CRICHTON, F.E.                                                     (p. 110)
               Peep-in-the-World.
               Longmans. 1.25

An altogether charming description of a little girl's happy year spent
with her German uncle in the old family castle. Peep-in-the-World's
friendship with Knut the dwarf, who lives in the forest surrounded by
the animals he loves and cares for, and the founding of an Order of
Knights by the children, are sweet and natural incidents.


DIAZ, A. (M.).
               *The William Henry Letters.
               Lothrop. 1.00

Written by William Henry during the two years he was away at school.
One of the best books for boys, and they love it. It has high
standards, abounds in homely common-sense, and is very funny.


EDGEWORTH, MARIA
               Tales from Maria Edgeworth.
               Illustrated by Hugh Thomson.
               Stokes. 1.50

Austin Dobson, in his introduction, gives us a sketch of Maria
Edgeworth's upbringing and of the conditions which helped to produce
the famous Parent's Assistant, from which twelve of the sixteen
stories are here reprinted, accompanied by Mr. Thomson's delightful
pictures.

     "Fairies were not much in her line," says Mrs. Richmond Ritchie,
     Thackeray's daughter, "but philanthropic manufacturers,       (p. 111)
     liberal noblemen, and benevolent ladies in travelling carriages,
     do as well and appear in the nick of time to distribute rewards
     or to point a moral."--_Introduction._


HALE, L.P.
               *The Peterkin Papers.
               Houghton. 1.50

     "Mr. Peterkin, Agamemnon, and Solomon John, took the postal card
     to the post-office early one morning.... It must have been read
     along its way: for by each mail came piles of postals and letters
     from town after town, in answer to the question, and all in the
     same tone: 'Yes, yes; publish the adventures of the Peterkin
     family.'"

The trials and troubles of the Peterkins and the helpful suggestions
of the resourceful lady from Philadelphia will long be a source of
amusement to folks both old and young.


JENKS, A.E.
               The Childhood of Ji-shib, the Ojibwa.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               The American Thresherman. 1.00

     The story is written with no other thought than to have
     constantly in mind what the Ojibwa child believes about the
     events of his every-day life as given in the story. And the
     following incidents are taken directly from the common life of
     the tribe.
                                        A.E. JENKS.

     And now comes Dr. Jenks with a story of a Red Child, in which he
     displays deep insight into Indian character, and describes the
     Red Child as that interesting person might have described himself
     in his own wigwam and to his own grandchildren in the evening of
     his life. May many White Children read the story and learn
     therein of our passing race.
                                        W.J. McGEE.

This mysterious tale of Ji-shib the Chippewa, and A-mi-kons the    (p. 112)
little beaver, his totem, follows Indian life from birth to early
manhood. Dr. Jenks has prepared many small accompanying sketches.


LAMB, CHARLES and MARY.
               Mrs. Leicester's School.
               Illustrated by Winifred Green.
               Macmillan. 2.25

Narratives of the early days of some little school-girls of long ago,
related by themselves. Charmingly illustrated in color; the costumes
those of the period.

     My Sister's part in the Leicester School (about two-thirds) was
     purely her own; as it was (to the same quantity) in the
     Shakespeare Tales which bear my name. I wrote only the Witch
     Aunt, the First Going to Church, and the final story about a
     little Indian Girl in a Ship.
                                        LAMB.


SMITH, M.P. (W.).
               Jolly Good Times.
               Little. 1.25

Childhood days on a farm near old Deerfield, fifty or sixty years ago.
The story has a fresh, wholesome atmosphere, and children of to-day
love the simple happenings.


SMITH, M.P. (W.).
               Jolly Good Times at School.
               Little. 1.25

A continuation of the farm life of the children we learned to know (p. 113)
in Jolly Good Times, telling of school-days and winter fun.


SPYRI, JOHANNA.
               Heidi.
               De Wolfe. 1.50

This delightful book is generally accepted as giving the best picture
of child-life in the Swiss Alps.


STODDARD, W.O.
               Two Arrows.
               Harper. .60

The exploit by which a young Nez Perce won his name, and his further
prowess, are related. The adventures of a mining party and the pursuit
of rebellious Apaches by a company of United States cavalry are just
what boys will enjoy reading about.


WYSS, J.D.
               The Swiss Family Robinson.
               Illustrated by H. Kley.
               Dutton. 2.50

The experiences of this shipwrecked family are thus happily
characterized by the _Spectator_: They _did_ sail in the tubs, and
train zebras and ostriches for riding, and grow apples and pines in
the same garden; and why shouldn't they?


YONGE, C.M.
               The Little Duke.
               Macmillan. 1.25

An account of the boyhood days of Richard the Fearless, Duke of
Normandy, vassal of Louis IV, one of the last of the degenerate line
of Charlemagne.




_ELEVEN YEARS OF AGE_                                              (p. 114)

  _Clothes for the back, books for the head:
  Read, and remember them when they are read._
                                        THACKERAY.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

     He talks of wood: it is some carpenter.
                                        SHAKSPERE.


WHEELER, C.G.
               Woodworking for Beginners.
               Putnam. 2.50

This very comprehensive volume gives information about tools,
different kinds of woods, and the fitting up of workshops; with full
directions for the building of simple houses, boats, toboggans, and
numerous small articles. There are many working diagrams.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT

  I sing of heroes and of kings,
  In mighty numbers mighty things.
                                        COWLEY.


BROOKS, E.S.
               The Century Book for Young Americans.
               Century. 1.50

Issued under the auspices of the National Society of the Sons of the
American Revolution, this volume gives an account of the visit of  (p. 115)
a party of young people to Washington, where they learned much of
interest regarding our government and the workings of its different
departments. There are many illustrations.

     "For Mr. Dunlop had said to his brother: 'Take them, first, to
     the centre of things, Tom. Go to Washington. Let them see why our
     government was made, how it was made, and how it is run.'"

     Much regret has been felt from the fact that there has been no
     book published heretofore in which the principles contended for
     in the American Revolution, and a description of the institutions
     of the Government, have been set forth in a sufficiently
     interesting form to make the study attractive to children....
     This work has now been produced, and it is presented in a form
     which commends itself highly to the Society, and has received its
     cordial approval.
                                        HORACE PORTER.


BROOKS, E.S.
               The Century Book of Famous Americans.
               Century. 1.50

This companion to The Century Book for Young Americans, issued under
the auspices of the National Society of the Daughters of the American
Revolution, gives a description of the pilgrimage of the same young
people to historic homes. It is fully illustrated.


BROOKS, E.S.
               The True Story of Benjamin Franklin.
               Lothrop. 1.50

     As one who had a hand in shaping the destinies and securing the
     independence of his native land, by word and pen, by brain    (p. 116)
     and hand, it is most fitting that the story of his life should
     be retold for young Americans.--_Preface._

The volume contains many pictures.

     Being ignorant is not so much a shame as being unwilling to
     learn.--_Poor Richard's Almanac._


BROOKS, E.S.
               The True Story of Lafayette.
               Lothrop. 1.50

     The whole life of Lafayette was a long struggle for
     constitutional liberty, the freedom he had seen America secure
     and which he so ardently desired for France.--_Preface._

Mr. Brooks's account emphasizes the great Frenchman's disinterested
services to our country at a time of dire need. Many illustrations add
to the book's value.


CHENOWETH, C. (V.D.).
               Stories of the Saints.
               Houghton. 1.25

     "And as those of us who are men and women look with reverent and
     smiling interest upon the outgrown garments, and books, and toys,
     of our childhood, even so I think must Christendom ever look upon
     these outgrown beliefs of an earlier day. There is not one of the
     stories we can yet afford to lose. For we find, as we arrange the
     allegory and romance, and the real, historic bits, in a way to
     suit our wiser time, that the lessons they hold are as true for
     us as they were for the childlike people who cherished them a
     thousand years ago."

The lives and legends of Saint George, Saint Denis, Saint Nicholas,
Saint Elizabeth, and others less well known in the great brotherhood
of all lands, are told with dignity and simplicity. The            (p. 117)
illustrations are taken from old pictures.


COFFIN, C.C.
               The Boys of '76.
               Harper. 2.00

     In this volume an attempt has been made to give a concise, plain,
     and authentic narrative of the principal battles of the
     Revolution as witnessed by those who took part in
     them.--_Preface._

A companion to Old Times in the Colonies, with maps and many pictures.


COFFIN, C.C.
               Old Times in the Colonies.
               Harper. 2.00

Mr. Coffin's writings are full of reliable historical information,
interestingly told. This, the first of a series, takes us from the
discovery of San Salvador to the surrender of Montreal to General
Amherst, in 1760. There are maps and many illustrations.


CREIGHTON, L.H. (V.G.).
               A First History of France.
               Longmans. 1.25

There is no reason why history should not be made delightful, though
it so often fails in this respect. This little book of Mrs. Mandell
Creighton's, with its good maps, and illustrations, many of them from
old prints, is truly interesting to children.


GILMAN, ARTHUR.
               The Making of the American Nation.
               Lothrop. .50

     The term Making of the American Nation, as used in the title  (p. 118)
     of the present volume, is intended to mean the process by which
     the loosely connected American communities outgrew their colonial
     condition of social and political life, and developed into a
     nation.--_Preface._


HART, A.B., and B.E. HAZARD (Editors).
               Colonial Children.
               Macmillan. .40

This is the first of four readers which portray the life and
conditions of our country at different periods by means of extracts
from contemporary sources, freely edited. Many illustrations are
given.

     The stories are the same in substance as when they were first
     told, two and three centuries ago; but their garb has been
     changed without adding a detail or altering a statement of
     fact.--_Introduction._


HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL.
               Grandfather's Chair, and Biographical Stories.
               Houghton. .70

     In writing this ponderous tome, the author's desire has been to
     describe the eminent characters and remarkable events of our
     annals in such a form and style that the YOUNG may make
     acquaintance with them of their own accord. For this purpose,
     while ostensibly relating the adventures of a chair, he has
     endeavored to keep a distinct and unbroken thread of authentic
     history.... The author, it is true, has sometimes assumed the
     license of filling up the outline of history with details for
     which he has none but imaginative authority, but which, he hopes,
     do not violate nor give a false coloring to the
     truth.--_Preface._

Grandfather's Chair records, in narrative form, New England        (p. 119)
chronicles from 1620 to the War for Independence. Biographical Stories
are tales of West, Newton, Johnson, Cromwell, Franklin, and Queen
Christina, told to a little boy with defective sight. The book has a
biographical sketch, notes, and illustrations.


HEMSTREET, CHARLES.
               The Story of Manhattan.
               Scribner. 1.00

     Here the history of New York City is told as a story, in few
     words. The effort has been to make it accurate and interesting.
     The illustrations are largely from old prints and wood
     engravings. Few dates are used. Instead, a Table of Events has
     been added which can readily be referred to. The Index to
     Chapters also gives the years in which the story of each chapter
     occurs.--_Preface._


HILL, C.T.
               Fighting a Fire.
               Century. 1.50

An interesting account of the methods used in extinguishing fires and
the thrilling experiences of the firemen in the city of New York,
which will enthrall boys.


McMASTER, J.B.
               A Primary History of the United States.
               American Book. .60

     This book has been written in the belief that a primary history
     of the United States should be short, as interesting as possible,
     and well illustrated.... The illustrations are historically
     authentic.--_Preface._


PRICE, L.L.                                                        (p. 120)
               Wandering Heroes.
               Silver. .50

The deeds of great men belonging to different
nomadic peoples are recounted. We are told
about Abraham, Moses, Prince Siddartha, Clovis,
Attila, Godwin, and Knut.


TAPPAN, E.M.
               In the Days of Alfred the Great.
               Lothrop. 1.00

As stated in the preface, this narrative of the life of the famous
king is the result of a thoughtful study of his character and an
earnest effort to be as accurate as the scantiness of material and the
thousand years' interval would permit.

     I have sought to live my life worthily.
                                        ALFRED THE GREAT.


TAPPAN, E.M.
               In the Days of Queen Elizabeth.
               Lothrop. 1.00

     Of all the sovereigns that have worn the crown of England, Queen
     Elizabeth is the most puzzling, the most fascinating, the most
     blindly praised, and the most unjustly blamed.... At a distance
     of three hundred years it is not easy to balance these claims to
     censure and to admiration, but at least no one should forget that
     the little white hand of which she was so vain guided the ship of
     state with most consummate skill in its perilous passage through
     the troubled waters of the latter half of the sixteenth
     century.--_Preface._

The book is illustrated from well-known paintings.


TAPPAN, E.M.                                                       (p. 121)
               In the Days of William the Conqueror.
               Lothrop. 1.00

     The story of William the Conqueror is the story of the man who
     for more than a quarter of a century was the most prominent
     personage of Western Europe.... Whatever in the character of the
     Conqueror the twentieth century may find worthy of blame or of
     praise, no student of his life will deny that his faults were
     those of his time, that his virtues were his own.--_Preface._



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

     Our country is the world; our countrymen are all mankind.
                                        GARRISON.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.
               England.
               Macmillan. .75

London Town is described, there are two chapters on Father Thames, and
we are led through old Wessex, Warwickshire, the Broads and
Fen-country, and the beautiful Lakeland. Twelve plates in color are
given.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.
               The Holy Land.
               Illustrated by John Fulleylove.
               Macmillan. .75

This account of peasant homes and the life of the people throughout
the year makes many allusions in the Gospel story easily understood.
There are chapters on Jerusalem and Bethlehem, and one entitled    (p. 122)
From Nazareth to Galilee. The volume contains twelve colored plates.


HOPE, A.R.
               The World.
               Macmillan. 1.50

Although from its nature and size this book can give only a glimpse of
each country, yet it does seem to convey, in moderate compass, a
general view of the world, and quite a vivid impression of the
different lands is absorbed from the colored pictures, which children
always enjoy. The plates are thirty-seven in number.


JUNGMAN, BEATRIX.
               Holland.
               Illustrated by Nico Jungman.
               Macmillan. .75

A pleasant account of the manners and customs, the costumes and
feast-days, of Water land. The twelve colored plates add to the book's
attraction.


PELTIER, FLORENCE (Mrs. F. (P.) POPE).
               A Japanese Garland.
               Lothrop. 1.00

Charming accounts of the legends, stories, and customs, of the Flowery
Kingdom, related by a little Japanese boy to his child friends in
America.


STRANGE LANDS NEAR HOME.
               Ginn. .25

This small volume contains a series of brief articles, by different
persons, on Mexico and South America. Some of the subjects touched (p. 123)
on are A Venezuelan Railway, The Land of the Llama, and The Argentine
Capital.


TOWARD THE RISING SUN.
               Ginn. .25

This companion volume to Strange Lands Near Home tells us of life in
China, Japan, Korea, Borneo, and other Eastern countries. There is an
interesting chapter on Housekeeping in East India, by Sara Jeannette
Duncan.



HYGIENE

     That man has a liberal education who has been so trained in youth
     that his body is the ready servant of his will, and does with
     ease and pleasure all the work that, as a mechanism, it is
     capable of.
                                        HUXLEY.


JEWETT, F.G.
               Good Health.
               Ginn. .40

A clear statement of facts concerning the body and the attention that
should be given to it. There are chapters on fresh air, eyesight, the
ear, the care of the nails, hair, and teeth, and valuable information
about tobacco and alcohol, and their effects on animals as well as
people.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

  So it is; yet let us sing
  Honour to the old bowstring!
  Honour to the bugle-horn!
  Honour to the woods unshorn!
  Honour to the Lincoln green!                                     (p. 124)
  Honour to the archer keen!
  Honour to tight little John,
  And the horse he rode upon!
  Honour to bold Robin Hood,
  Sleeping in the underwood:
  Honour to Maid Marian,
  And to all the Sherwood clan!
  Though their days have hurried by
  Let us two a burden try.
                                        KEATS.


BALDWIN, JAMES.
               The Story of Roland.
               Scribner. 1.50

This romance tells of the great Charlemagne, and of his warriors,
Roland and Oliver and Ogier the Dane, all companions in arms. As James
Baldwin states, Roland is unknown to history, yet he is the typical
knight, the greatest hero of the Middle Ages. The story is culled from
the song-writers and poets of five centuries and of as many languages.


BALDWIN, JAMES.
               The Story of Siegfried.
               Illustrated by Howard Pyle.
               Scribner. 1.50

From the many versions, Elder and Younger Edda, Volsunga Saga, and
Nibelungen Lied, including modern sources, Mr. Baldwin has reshaped
this ancient tale. Though he sometimes draws material from his own
imagination, the essential parts of the myth remain unaltered.


CHURCH, A.J.                                                       (p. 125)
               The AEneid for Boys and Girls.
               Macmillan. 1.50

The famous wanderings are retold from Virgil in simple language.
Twelve illustrations in color accompany the text.


CHURCH, A.J.
               The Iliad for Boys and Girls.
               Macmillan. 1.50

In a straightforward manner Mr. Church relates the incidents of the
great siege. The volume contains twelve colored illustrations.


HARRIS, J.C.
               *Nights with Uncle Remus.
               Houghton. 1.50

This second book of folk-lore is supplementary to Uncle Remus; His
Songs and His Sayings, and gives a large number of additional myths
and legends of the South.


HUTCHINSON, W.M.L.
               The Golden Porch.
               Longmans. 1.40

     In adding one more to the innumerable collections of stories from
     the Greek, I have hoped to break fresh ground by reproducing the
     myths of Pindar's Odes, as far as possible in a free translation,
     and with such additions only as were needed to form a framework.
     Some of these legends are already wholly or partly familiar, but
     several will be new, I think, to English readers.--_Preface._

These old tales are rendered in exquisite language. They include,
among others, the stories of Tantalus, the Heavenly Twins, Jason,  (p. 126)
and the Pansy Baby. The poet was bidden to prepare the Ode, from which
this last story is taken, in honor of a friend's victory in the Olympic
Games. The illustrations are in terra-cotta and black.


KIPLING, RUDYARD.
               The Second Jungle Book.
               Century. 1.50

Telling more of Mowgli, the child of the jungle, and his brethren the
wild creatures of the forest; together with other marvellous animal
stories.

  "Now these are the Laws of the Jungle, and many and mighty
    are they;
  But the head and the hoof of the Law and the haunch and
    the hump is--Obey!"


MARVIN, F.S., R.J.C. MAYOR, and F.M. STAWELL (Editors).
               The Adventures of Odysseus.
               Illustrated by Charles Robinson.
               Dutton. 1.50

     It has been our aim in this book to reproduce the substance of
     Homer's Odyssey in simple modern English. We have not hesitated
     to omit and compress where we thought fit, but we have done our
     best to make a faithful translation within our limits, and to
     keep what we could of the Homeric spirit.--_Preface._


PYLE, HOWARD.
               The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Scribner. 3.00

Henry II and Queen Eleanor, the Lord Bishop of Hereford, the       (p. 127)
Sheriff of Nottingham, and Richard of the Lion's Heart, come forth
from the land of mingled fact and fancy, with Robin Hood and his merry
train, and live for us. While the text of this luxurious volume is
dignified and somewhat archaic, children delight in reading it,
nevertheless. There are many full-page illustrations.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS

     But if he is a real classic, if his work belongs to the class of
     the very best (for this is the true and right meaning of the word
     classic, classical), then the great thing for us is to feel and
     enjoy his work as deeply as ever we can, and to appreciate the
     wide difference between it and all work which has not the same
     high character.
                                        MATTHEW ARNOLD.


CERVANTES, MIGUEL DE.
               *Don Quixote of the Mancha.
               Edited by E.A. Parry.
               Illustrated by Walter Crane.
               Lane. 1.50

     Let it be understood that all I have attempted to do is to tell a
     well-known story in print, as one who loves it would seek to tell
     it in words to those around his own fireside; in the hope that
     some may gather from this story that there is a vast storehouse
     of humour and wisdom awaiting them in the book
     itself.--_Preface._


HOLMES, O.W.                                                       (p. 128)
               *The One Hoss Shay, and Companion Poems.
               Illustrated by Howard Pyle.
               Houghton. 1.50

How the Old Horse Won the Bet, and The Broomstick Train, are the other
poems.

  "You see, of course, if you're not a dunce,
  How it went to pieces all at once--
  All at once, and nothing first--
  Just as bubbles do when they burst."


MacLEOD, MARY.
               Stories from the Faerie Queene.
               Illustrated by A.G. Walker.
               Stokes. 1.50

Do we not most of us belong to the group "who at present know nothing
or next to nothing of what is certainly one of the masterpieces of
English literature"?

The tale of Spenser's great poem is simply related in acceptable
prose.


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume IV. Fairy Stories and
               Classic Tales.
               Heath. .45

     The imagination is the supreme intellectual faculty, and yet it
     is of all the one which receives least attention in our common
     systems of education.--_Preface._



RELIGION AND ETHICS                                                (p. 129)

     The Bible itself did not begin in the dry letter, but was a rich
     and various life with Nature and among men before it was made
     into a book.
                                        SAMUEL OSGOOD.


THOMAS, E.L.
               The Early Story of Israel.
               Longmans. .60

This small volume presents a general view of the early history of the
Jews, in accordance with the results of the best Biblical and
historical criticism. In addition to the maps and illustrations, there
are six full-page plates from famous paintings.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

  When I survey the bright
  Celestial sphere,
  So rich with jewels hung, that night
  Doth like an Ethiop bride appear;
  My soul her wings doth spread,
  And heavenward flies,
  The Almighty's mysteries to read
  In the large volumes of the skies.
                                        HABINGTON.


BALL, R.S.
               Starland.
               Ginn. 1.00

The Royal Institution of Great Britain each year provides at
Christmas-time a course of lectures for children. In 1881 and 1887 Sir
R.S. Ball gave talks on astronomy, and on them the present volume  (p. 130)
is founded.


BLANCHAN, NELTJE (Pseudonym of Mrs. N.B. (DeG.) DOUBLEDAY.)
               Bird Neighbors.
               With an introduction by John Burroughs.
               Doubleday. 2.00

     Illustrated with full-page color plates. Non-technical. Birds
     grouped according to size and color; no specific color key.
     Rather full biographies. There are chapters giving the
     characteristics of the families, the habitats, and the seasons of
     occurrence.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.

Mr. Burroughs states that this book, which describes one hundred and
fifty of our more common birds, is reliable, and is written in a
vivacious strain by a real bird-lover, and should prove helpful and
stimulating to any one who seeks by the aid of its pages to become
better acquainted with our songsters. There are forty-eight plates in
color.


BLANCHAN, NELTJE (Pseudonym of Mrs. N.B. (DeG.) DOUBLEDAY).
               Nature's Garden.
               Doubleday. 3.00

Mrs. Doubleday has classified over five hundred flowers according to
color, months of blooming, their preferred localities or habitats, and
finally according to their proper families--by the classification
adopted by the International Botanical Congress. Special attention has
been given to the flowers' insect visitors. This large volume      (p. 131)
contains thirty-two pages of color plates, and forty-eight in black
and white. Children learn so much from association with a book of this
sort that it has been placed, because of the pictures, under a younger
heading than the text alone would warrant.

     Mr. Dugmore's very beautiful photographs in color from the living
     flowers, and the no less exquisite portraits from life in black
     and white by Mr. Troth, cannot but prove the most attractive, as
     they are the most useful, feature of this book.--_Preface._


BURROUGHS, JOHN.
               Squirrels and Other Fur-Bearers.
               Houghton. 1.00

This wise old nature-lover tells us in his delightful way of the fox,
mink, skunk, weasel, porcupine, muskrat, and other wild creatures.
There are fifteen colored illustrations reduced from Audubon's large
pictures.


CRAGIN, B.S.
               Our Insect Friends and Foes.
               Putnam. 1.75

     A boy of eleven once asked me, in the midst of a schoolroom talk
     on the uses of participles, where a grasshopper's ears were.... I
     did not wonder that he found grasshoppers more interesting than
     participles--I do myself--and so, I am sure, do the young people
     for whom, most of all, this book has been written.--_Preface._

Butterflies, moths, and insects, are described, and full directions
for collecting, preserving, and studying them, given in this       (p. 132)
satisfactory volume, which contains many illustrations. A list of
popular and scientific names is included.


ECKSTORM, F.H.
              The Woodpeckers.
              Houghton. 1.00

     Illustrated with colored plates and figures in the text;
     non-technical; color key. This is an introduction to the study of
     Woodpeckers. Not arranged as a manual, but giving information as
     to structure and habits of the family, with several studies of
     individual species.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.


LANG, ANDREW (Editor).
               The Red Book of Animal Stories.
               Longmans. 2.00

Creatures mythical and real, extinct monsters and animals of to-day,
dwell at peace within this book of many tales. Adventures of famous
men, experiences of animal trainers, and stories of a quieter nature,
are included.


MORLEY, M.W.
               Wasps and Their Ways.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Dodd. 1.50

To learn so easily and pleasantly about the wasp from an authority may
keep boys from destroying their nests and wantonly annoying them.

  And still, they say, in foreign lands,
    do men this language hold,
  There's nothing like your Attic wasp,
    so testy and so bold.
                                        ARISTOPHANES.


PROCTOR, R.A.                                                      (p. 133)
               Half-Hours with the Stars.
               Putnam. 2.00

     A plain and easy guide to the knowledge of the constellations,
     showing, in twelve maps, the position for the United States of
     the principal star groups night after night throughout the year,
     with introduction and a separate explanation of each
     map.--_Title-page._



STORIES

     The books that charmed us in youth recall the delight ever
     afterwards; we are hardly persuaded there are any like them, any
     deserving equally our affections. Fortunate if the best fall in
     our way during this susceptible and forming period of our lives.
                                        A. BRONSON ALCOTT.


ALDEN, W.L.
               The Moral Pirates.
               Harper. .60

Four boys cruise in a large rowboat up the Hudson River and on some of
the Adirondack Lakes, camping out, and having many funny and exciting
experiences.


BLACK, WILLIAM.
               The Four MacNicols, and An Adventure in Thule.
               Harper. .60

This volume is given because of the first of these two stories, which
is not published separately. It tells of the fishing experiences of
four Scotch brothers, and shows how much plucky lads can accomplish.
In An Adventure in Thule two boys discover a young Frenchwoman     (p. 134)
stranded on an island, and succeed in rescuing her.


CHURCH, A.J.
               Three Greek Children.
               Putnam. 1.25

An abundance of information about Greek life and customs is woven
interestingly into the fabric of this tale. The battles of Marathon
and Salamis are fought anew for the children by old men who were
participants therein, and the Isthmian games are also described.


COOLIDGE, SUSAN (Pseudonym of S.C. Woolsey).
               What Katy Did.
               Little. 1.25

  TO FIVE

  Six of us once, my darlings, played together
  Beneath green boughs, which faded long ago,
  Made merry in the golden summer weather,
  Pelted each other with new-fallen snow.
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  So, darlings, take this little childish story,
  In which some gleams of the old sunshine play,
  And, as with careless hands you turn the pages,
  Look back and smile, as here I smile to-day.

This account of the lively doings of the six little Carrs is full of
action and interest. In the midst of her happy life poor Katy has to
stop and learn, through the invalidism which comes as the result of an
accident, the great lessons of patience, cheerfulness, and living for
others. Happily, in the end, after her battle has been won, full
health returns to her.


DEFOE, DANIEL.                                                     (p. 135)
               Robinson Crusoe.
               Illustrated by the Brothers Rhead.
               Harper. 1.50

     Every child comprehends everything in Robinson Crusoe save one
     sole point--what conceivable reason he could have had for feeling
     discontented.
                                        THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON.

The illustrations are the result of a special trip to the island of
Tobago, the scene of the great narrative, and are from sketches made
on the island.


DODGE, M. (M.).
               Hans Brinker.
               Scribner. 1.50

First published in 1865, and since translated into many languages,
this book still stands as _the_ picture of life in Holland to give to
boys and girls.


EGGLESTON, EDWARD.
               The Hoosier School-Boy.
               Scribner. 1.00

School life in town and village of the Middle West, in 1850. First
published in 1883, the story has retained popularity.


JACKSON, H.M. (F.) H.
               Nelly's Silver Mine.
               Little. 1.50

Rob and Nelly leave their New England home and journey with their
parents to Colorado. There they have many interesting experiences in
the silver mining country, which are told in Mrs. Jackson's        (p. 136)
charming natural style.


JEWETT, S.O.
               Betty Leicester.
               Houghton. 1.25

Fifteen-year-old Betty spends a happy and satisfactory summer at
Tideshead with her two aged aunts, bringing brightness and pleasure
into their quiet lives.


JOHNSON, ROSSITER.
               *Phaeton Rogers.
               Scribner. 1.50

Phaeton was so inventive that he was always in hot water. Boys love to
read of his pranks and pleasures.


LUCAS, E.V.
               Anne's Terrible Good Nature, and Other Stories for Children.
               Macmillan. 1.75

The atmosphere of these eleven tales is decidedly English, but they
are so unusually good that our children will read them with enjoyment
notwithstanding the unfamiliar setting. The Thousand Threepenny Bits,
The Anti-Burglars, and the uncommonly funny one called The Monkey's
Revenge, are among the number.


MARRYAT, FREDERICK.
               Masterman Ready.
               Illustrated by Fred Pegram.
               Macmillan. 1.50

As children we parents learned to love old Masterman, the faithful (p. 137)
and resourceful friend of the good Seagraves. Even now our eyes grow a
little misty as we think of his brave death.

Marryat began a continuation of The Swiss Family Robinson for his
children, at their request, but its geographical anachronisms were too
much for him, and he decided to write this story instead. No one will
find fault with the change of plan.


MORRISON, S.E.
                Chilhowee Boys.
                Crowell. .75

This account of pioneer days is essentially true, having been gathered
from family records which tell how, in 1811, "Parson Craig," with his
wife, six children, and a number of friends, made the four-hundred-mile
journey from North Carolina into Tennessee.


PAGE, T.N.
               Two Little Confederates.
               Scribner. 1.50

While this description of the life of two boys on a Southern
plantation during the Civil War is dramatic and full of pathos, it is
hardly necessary to say that Mr. Page, with his unerring touch, has
not overdrawn a single detail of those days, happily long gone.


PHELPS, E.S. (Mrs. E.S. (P.) WARD).
               Gypsy Breynton.
               Dodd. 1.50

Every girl will love impulsive, careless Gypsy with her many       (p. 138)
faults and the many more winning qualities of her warm-hearted nature.

     Wherever there is mischief, there is Gypsy. Yet, wherever there
     is fun, and health, and hope, and happiness--and I think,
     wherever there is truthfulness and generosity--there is Gypsy,
     too.--_Preface._


PHELPS, E.S. (Mrs. E.S. (P.) WARD).
               Gypsy's Cousin Joy.
               Dodd. 1.50

Gypsy didn't want Joy to come and live with them at all, neither did
she care for her at first, but through forbearance, gentleness, and
Joy's great sorrow, they grew to love each other warmly.


SEAWELL, M.E.
               @Little Jarvis.
               Appleton. 1.00

The hero, midshipman on the Constellation, in the fight between that
ship and the French frigate Vengeance, gave his life with notable
bravery in the service of his country.


SMITH, M.P. (W.).
               Jolly Good Times at Hackmatack.
               Little. 1.25

A faithful description of farm life among the hills of Western
Massachusetts seventy-five years ago.

     Before these times become wholly traditional, it seems good to
     picture them, as vividly as may be, for the benefit of the young
     folks who will grow up under influences differing so widely from
     those that shaped the youth of their ancestors.... They, and  (p. 139)
     such as they, made the old New England the New England of glorious
     history and memories.--_Preface._


SMITH, N.A.
               Three Little Marys.
               Houghton. .85

Little girls of our own country will enjoy reading these three
sketches which tell of faithful Gypsy Mairi of Scotland, English Molly
of Sussex, and Irish Maureen. Each one of the three is natural,
lovable, and worth knowing.


STOWE, H.B.
               Little Pussy Willow.
               Houghton. 1.25

This old-fashioned story of the country mouse and the city mouse
possesses charm, and abounds in homely common-sense. Mothers,
fortunately, no longer bring up their daughters in the foolish way in
which Emily Proudie was reared. The second story is included only
because there is no other edition of Pussy Willow.


ZOLLINGER, GULIELMA (Pseudonym of WILLIAM Z. GLAD WIN).
               *The Widow O'Callaghan's Boys.
               Illustrated by Florence Scovel Shinn.
               McClurg. 1.50

An account of seven lads, who, after their father's death, help their
brave little mother to keep the family together. Simply told; full of
sterling common-sense and unselfish precept. The colored illustrations
are delightful.

     The staunch widow and her seven sons are an admirable         (p. 140)
     object-lesson in faithfulness to the claims of small things.
     Quite inimitable is Mrs. O'Callaghan's Irish way of putting
     things, which furnishes the salt to the solid nutriment of the
     story.--_The Nation._




_TWELVE YEARS OF AGE_                                              (p. 141)

     _The True University of these days is a collection of books._
                                        CARLYLE.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

  When Youth and Pleasure meet
  To chase the glowing Hours with flying feet.
                                        BYRON.


BOND, A.R.
               The Scientific American Boy.
               Munn. 2.00

In the course of this camping story directions are given for making
tents and other appurtenances of camp-life, bridges, windmills,
ice-boats, sledges, et cetera. There are many illustrations.


TAYLOR, C.M., JR.
               Why My Photographs Are Bad.
               Jacobs. 1.00

Most of this very practical volume is devoted to the mistakes so
familiar to those of us who have attempted photography. The short
chapters are accompanied by pictures illustrating the failures
described. Examples of twelve successful photographs and information
with each about the plate and time of exposure will give encouragement
to the beginner.


WHITE, MARY.                                                       (p. 142)
               How to Make Baskets.
               Doubleday. 1.00

A fully illustrated little book which contains clear directions for
weaving many sorts of baskets, mats, bags, and other small articles.

The use of dyes is taught, and information given about raffia, rattan,
and other necessary materials. There is a chapter on caning chairs,
and one by Neltje Blanchan on What the Basket Means to the Indian.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT

     There is no Past so long as
     Books shall live!
                                        BULWER-LYTTON.


ARNOLD, E.J.
               Stories of Ancient Peoples.
               American Book. .50

An exceedingly interesting scholarly account of the ancient
Orientals--Egyptians, Hittites, Medes and Persians, Chinese, and
others. Descriptions of their methods of writing and translations from
manuscripts and tablets are given.


BARNES, JAMES.
               The Hero of Erie.
               Appleton. 1.00

The brilliant career of Oliver Hazard Perry is simply presented. There
is a detailed description of the Battle of Lake Erie, accompanied  (p. 143)
by diagrams, and illustrations from contemporary engravings.


CLEMENT, C.E. (Mrs. C.E. (C.) WATERS).
               Stories of Art and Artists.
               Houghton. 4.00

Mrs. Waters speaks with authority, and this fully illustrated volume,
prepared with her own little daughter in mind, will be enjoyed by
art-loving children. Many anecdotes are related. The first part is
devoted to Ancient Art, including Sculpture.


COFFIN, C.C.
               Building the Nation.
               Harper. 2.00

The story of our country from the Revolution to the beginning of the
Civil War. Like the others of this series, it has maps and many
illustrations.


CUSTER, E. (B.).
               Boots and Saddles.
               Harper. 1.50

Mrs. Custer gives us a picture, drawn from her own experiences, of
garrison and camp life on the frontier. The book ends with brief
mention of the battle of the Little Big Horn, of Sunday, June
twenty-fifth, 1876, in which General Custer lost his life.


DICKENS, CHARLES.
               A Child's History of England.
               Houghton. 2.50

     Its adaptation to the needs of children lies in its lively    (p. 144)
     narrative form, and the picturesqueness of many of the scenes
     which it presents.--_Introduction._

This volume, written with Dickens' own eight children in mind, now
more than fifty years ago, holds the interest of the boys and girls of
to-day as keenly as when it first appeared. The many excellent
illustrations add to its attraction and value.


DOLE, C.F.
               The Young Citizen.
               Heath. .45

Permeated by the spirit of a broad and noble patriotism, and written
in the interests of national peace, law, and good government, in
regard to which it gives, very simply, much information. There are
also chapters on voting, the proper use of the people's money, the
ideal city and town, policemen and their duties, et cetera; all quite
within the comprehension of a child. The book contains many
illustrations.


FOA, EUGENIE.
               The Boy Life of Napoleon.
               Edited by E.S. Brooks.
               Lothrop. 1.25

Children will enjoy reading of the childhood days of Napoleon and his
brothers and sisters, and of the school-boy life of this remarkable
lad who grew up from poverty to become the most wonderful man of his
time. Napoleon's experiences as a "king's scholar" in Paris, and as
lieutenant of an artillery regiment, are also described. Madame    (p. 145)
Foa's work is historically accurate, and her style very
interesting.


HART, A.B., and MABEL HILL (Editors).
               Camps and Firesides of the Revolution.
               Macmillan. .50

     The second volume of Source Readers is, like the first, wholly
     made up of pieces written at the time of the events and incidents
     here described. The language is modernized wherever
     necessary.--_Preface._


LANG, JEANIE.
               The Story of General Gordon.
               Dutton. .50

The character, as well as the deeds, of this remarkable man, whose
life stands for faith, courage, and charity, is interestingly drawn.
There are eight pictures in color.


SCUDDER, H.E.
               Boston Town.
               Houghton. 1.50

Events in the early annals of this old city recounted in pleasant
familiar fashion by a grandfather who visits the famous spots with the
boys. Many illustrations help to make real the happenings described.

  See, saw, sacradown!
  Which is the way to Boston Town?
  One foot up, the other foot down,
  That is the way to Boston Town.
                                        OLD RHYME.


SEAWELL, M.E.                                                      (p. 146)
               Paul Jones.
               Appleton. 1.00

     Although this story is professedly and confessedly a romance,
     history has been consulted at every point. Log-books, journals,
     and biographies, have been searched, especially the logs,
     journals, and letters, of Paul Jones himself. Much relating to
     him has been left out, but nothing of consequence has been put in
     that is not historically true. The language ascribed to him is,
     whenever possible, that used by him at the time, or afterward, in
     his letters and journals.--_Introduction._

  For Captain Paul Jones ever loved close fighting.
                                        FRANKLIN.


SEAWELL, M.E.
               Twelve Naval Captains.
               Scribner. 1.25

Brief accounts of the lives of some famous American commanders, many
of them of the period from 1798 to 1815. Preble, Decatur, Somers, and
Lawrence, are among the number. The book contains portraits.


SHEPARD, WILLIAM (Editor).
               Our Young Folks' Josephus.
               Lippincott. 1.25

     "Flavius Josephus was born at Jerusalem A.D. 37.... His history
     of The Jewish War, which was finished A.D. 75, was undertaken at
     the command of Vespasian, and is a noble and pathetic narrative
     of events that had been witnessed by himself. His other important
     work, The Antiquities of the Jews, was finished about A.D. 93,
     and was an attempt to familiarize the Roman people with the early
     history of the Jews as it is recorded in the Scripture."

     The following pages are ... a simplification of the story of  (p. 147)
     the Jews as related by Josephus.... Josephus wrote his histories
     for the Romans, and we need not therefore wonder ... at his
     modifying and toning down the historical statements of the
     Mosaic records to recommend them to the prejudices of his
     readers.--_Preface._


STOCKTON, F.R.
               Buccaneers and Pirates of Our Coasts.
               Macmillan. 1.50

     "When I was a boy I strongly desired to be a pirate.... In fact,
     I had a great desire to become what might be called a marine
     Robin Hood."

All boys will sympathize with this point of view, and will enjoy
reading of Morgan, Blackbeard, Kidd, and many less famous or infamous
men who sailed our coasts.



FINE ARTS

     Painting is silent poetry, and poetry is painting with the gift
     of speech.
                                        SIMONIDES.


STEEDMAN, AMY.
               Knights of Art.
               Jacobs. 2.00

     Best book on art for children (1907). Contains sketches of
     eighteen Italian painters from Giotto to Paul Veronese, based on
     Vasari, and attractively written. Sixteen color and eight black
     and white reproductions.
                                        NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY.

This volume seems to the compiler of this List one of the few books on
art which children will read with real enjoyment. It is not        (p. 148)
included with a view to having it take the place of a history of art,
but to give a part of the information which old Vasari has handed down
to us with such charm. The language is delightful, and we carry away
some of the atmosphere of that sunny Italian period. It is a pity that
we are not given illustrations photographed from the originals,
instead of more or less modified drawings.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

  Up! up! let us a voyage take;
  Why sit we here at ease?
  Find us a vessel tight and snug,
  Bound for the Northern Seas.
                                        WILLIAM HOWITT.


BROOKS, NOAH.
               The Story of Marco Polo.
               Century. 1.50

     The manner of the return of the Polos long after they had been
     given up for dead, the subsequent adventures of Marco Polo, the
     incredulity with which his book of travels was received, the
     gradual and slow confirmation of the truth of his reports as
     later explorations penetrated the mysterious Orient, and the fact
     that he may be justly regarded as the founder of the geography of
     Asia, have all combined to give to his narrative a certain
     fascination, with which no other story of travel has been
     invested.--_Preface._

As far as possible, Mr. Brooks has allowed the traveler to speak for
himself.


BULL, J.B.                                                         (p. 149)
               Fridtjof Nansen.
               Heath. .30

This highly interesting account of the great explorer, his crossing of
Greenland, and his Polar expedition, will enthrall young people as
Farthest North did their elders.


CARPENTER, F.G.
               South America.
               American Book. .60

In this good geographical reader the children are taken "upon a
personally conducted tour through the most characteristic parts of the
South American continent.... The book has the merit of being written
from original sources of information. It comprises the observations of
the author gathered in a trip of more than twenty-five thousand miles
along the routes herein described. Most of the descriptions were
written on the ground, and a very large number of the photographs were
made by the author especially for this book."


DU CHAILLU, P.B.
               The Land of the Long Night.
               Scribner. 2.00

Du Chaillu visited the Northern lands in winter, traveling overland to
Nordkyn, living among the Lapps, and later going in a fishing-boat off
the coast of Finmarken for cod.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.
               France.
               Illustrated by Nico Jungman and Others.
               Macmillan. .75

Three chapters are devoted to the Loire country, and we are told   (p. 150)
of Normandy and Brittany, as well as other parts of France, including
Paris. There is a sketch of boy and girl life which will make our young
people glad of their freer environment. The twelve colored pictures add
to the book's interest.


HORTON, EDITH.
               The Frozen North.
               Heath. .40

This account of Arctic exploration consists of a series of sketches of
different Polar expeditions, from the days of Sir John Franklin to the
Ziegler-Baldwin and other undertakings of 1902. Here children may read
consecutively of Kane, Nordenskjoeld, Greely, Nansen, and others, and
acquire a general view of Polar discovery.


KELLY, R.T.
               Egypt.
               Illustrated by the Author.
               Macmillan. .75

An interesting picture of this most interesting country. The Nile is
fully described, and there are chapters on the people, the desert, and
the monuments. The volume contains twelve plates in color.


NORDHOFF, CHARLES.
               Sailor Life on a Man-of-War.
               Dodd. 2.00

     To give a sailor's impressions of a sailor's life ... has been
     the aim. Neither exaggerating its hardships--they do not need
     it--nor highly coloring its delights, whatever those may be, the
     very plainest truth has been thought sufficient for the purpose
     in view.--_Original Preface._

Many changes and improvements have come about since 1854, when     (p. 151)
this volume was written, but it is republished without alteration of
the text, so as to give a picture of sailor days before the introduction
of steam.


PLUMMER, M.W.
               Roy and Ray in Mexico.
               Holt. 1.75

     Two wide-awake children, with their parents, visit modern cities
     and ancient ruins, learn much of customs and history, meet
     President Diaz, and compare things Mexican and American. Map,
     sixteen half-tone plates, and Mexican songs with music. Useful as
     a travel guide, and helpful to teachers and school children.
                                        NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY.


STARR, FREDERICK.
               Strange Peoples.
               Heath. .40

A series of brief accounts of some of the many peoples of the world,
accompanied by authentic illustrations. The author is Professor of
Anthropology in the University of Chicago.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

  Lo! I must tell a tale of chivalry;
  For large white plumes are dancing in mine eye.
                                        KEATS.


HIGGINSON, T.W.
               Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic.
               Illustrated by Albert Herter.
               Macmillan. 1.50

     Hawthorne, in his Wonder Book, has described the beautiful    (p. 152)
     Greek myths and traditions, but no one has yet made similar use of
     the wondrous tales that gathered for more than a thousand years
     about the islands of the Atlantic deep.... The order of the tales
     in the present work follows roughly the order of development,
     giving first the legends which kept near the European shore, and
     then those which, like St. Brandan's or Antillia, were assigned
     to the open sea or, like Norumbega or the Isle of Demons, to the
     very coast of America.... Every tale in this book bears reference
     to some actual legend, followed more or less closely.--_Preface._


LAMB, CHARLES.
               The Adventures of Ulysses.
               Illustrated by M.H. Squire and E. Mars.
               Russell. 2.50

     Intended to be an introduction to the reading of Telemachus; it
     is done out of the Odyssey, not from the Greek. I would not
     mislead you; nor yet from Pope's Odyssey, but from an older
     translation of one Chapman.
                                        LAMB.

This children's classic, with its pure and forceful English, is
presented in an attractive manner. The full-page illustrations are in
black and buff.


LANIER, SIDNEY (Editor).
               Knightly Legends of Wales, or The Boy's Mabinogion.
               Scribner. 2.00

The Mabinogion, or Welsh legends of King Arthur, belong to a much
earlier period than Malory. In this edition the original text is
scrupulously preserved, except for necessary excision, and occasional
condensation which is always placed in brackets.


WILSON, C.D.                                                       (p. 153)
               The Story of the Cid.
               Lothrop. 1.25

     "Thus lived and died the great Cid Campeador of Spain, most
     wonderful of heroes, who was never defeated, and who became the
     ancestor of kings."

This edition is founded upon the translation of Southey.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS

     In the best books, great men talk to us, with us, and give us
     their most precious thoughts. Books are the voices of the distant
     and the dead.... They give to all who will faithfully use them
     the society and the presence of the best and greatest of our
     race.
                                        CHANNING.


DARTON, F.J.H.
               Tales of the Canterbury Pilgrims.
               Stokes. 1.50

Mr. Darton has so delightfully made real the times of Richard II, and
has so well adapted the tales told by the immortal pilgrims, that we
owe him a debt of thanks. I say we, for certainly we older people will
enjoy them as much as our children. In retelling the tales in prose
the editor has introduced material from Lydgate and others. Dr.
Furnivall contributes an illuminating introduction, and Hugh Thomson's
illustrations are, as usual, very satisfactory.

     He (Chaucer) carried his sunshine with him as he rode and     (p. 154)
     walked about, observing with quick eye the varied life around
     him, and then reproducing it for us in words which enable us to
     recreate it, and to see the sun of his genius over the land we
     love.
                                        F.J. FURNIVALL.


LAMB, CHARLES and MARY.
               Tales from Shakspeare.
               Illustrated by N.M. Price.
               Scribner. 2.50

     The following Tales are meant to be submitted to the young reader
     as an introduction to the study of Shakspeare, for which purpose
     his words are used whenever it seemed possible to bring them in;
     ... words introduced into our language since his time have been
     as far as possible avoided.... What these Tales shall have been
     to the _young_ readers, that and much more it is the writers'
     wish that the true Plays of Shakspeare may prove to them in older
     years--enrichers of the fancy, strengtheners of virtue, a
     withdrawing from all selfish and mercenary thoughts, a lesson of
     all sweet and honourable thoughts and actions, to teach courtesy,
     benignity, generosity, humanity: for of examples, teaching these
     virtues, his pages are full.--_Preface._

     I have done Othello and Macbeth, and mean to do all the
     tragedies. I think it will be popular among the little people,
     besides money.
                                        LAMB.

This edition of an English classic contains engraved portraits of
Charles and Mary Lamb, after those in the National Portrait Gallery,
and twenty full-page illustrations in color.


MACAULAY, T.B.
               Lays of Ancient Rome.
               Illustrated by J.R. Weguelin.
               Longmans. 1.25

This attractive edition of Macaulay's famous poems contains, in    (p. 155)
addition, Ivry and The Armada.


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume V. Masterpieces of Literature.
               Heath. .50

     To make good reading more attractive than bad, to give right
     direction to the choice, the growing intelligence of the child
     should be nourished with selected portions of the best
     literature, the virtue of which has been approved by long
     consent.--_Preface._


WIGGIN, K.D. (S.) and N.A. SMITH (Editors).
               Golden Numbers.
               Doubleday. 2.00

Mrs. Wiggin tells us that she and her sister have searched the pages
of the great English-speaking poets to find verses that children will
love. The quest has been successful, for the collection gives us full
measure of that which is among the best in English poetry. The
selections are arranged under headings, such as The World Beautiful,
For Home and Country, and In Merry Mood. One division is devoted to
Christmas songs and carols.



RELIGION AND ETHICS

     Oh books!... Ye are the golden vessels of the temple, the arms of
     the soldiers of the Church, with which to quench all the fiery
     darts of the wicked.
                                        RICHARD DE BURY.


GILLIE, R.C.                                                       (p. 156)
               The Story of Stories.
               Macmillan. 1.25

An exceptionally good book, describing as a connected narrative the
events of Christ's life. The language is simple and dignified, and the
words of the Gospel, whenever used, are given without variation. Fully
illustrated from photographs of famous paintings.


STRONG, SYDNEY.
               Talks to Boys and Girls.
               Revell. .50

Under three divisions, Kite Talks, Random Talks, and The Life I Ought
to Live, Mr. Strong gives us practical, interesting, and helpful
suggestions for leading broad spiritual lives of love and usefulness.
Many anecdotes enliven the text.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

     If we do not plant knowledge when young, it will give us no shade
     when we are old.
                                        CHESTERFIELD.


BAKER, R.S.
               The Boy's Book of Inventions.
               Doubleday. 2.00

These accounts of the wonders of modern science tell of liquid air,
wireless telegraphy, X-Ray photography, and other marvels. There are
many illustrations.


BAMFORD, M.E.                                                      (p. 157)
               Up and Down the Brooks.
               Houghton. .75

A careful observer and nature-lover gives us a familiar account of the
wonderful lives of the little brook creatures. The insects mentioned
in these pages are those of Alameda County, California, but members of
the same families will be found in or beside almost any brook, East or
West.


CHAPMAN, F.M.
               Bird-Life.
               Illustrated by E.E. Thompson-Seton.
               Appleton. 2.00

     Illustrated with seventy-five full-page plates in color and
     figures in the text. Non-technical, with a color key to about one
     hundred and fifty of the more common species. This book is in two
     parts. The first chapters define the bird, its place in Nature,
     and its relation to man, and outline the leading facts in its
     life-history. The second part gives a Field Key based on color,
     and biographies of some of the common birds.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.


CLODD, EDWARD.
               The Childhood of the World.
               Kegan Paul. 1.25

     This book ... is an attempt, in the absence of any kindred
     elementary work, to narrate, in as simple language as the subject
     will permit, the story of man's progress from the unknown time of
     his early appearance upon the earth to the period from which
     writers of history ordinarily begin. ... The First Part of this
     book describes the progress of man in material things, while  (p. 158)
     the Second Part seeks to explain his mode of advance from
     lower to higher stages of religious belief.--_Preface._

  And step by step, since time began,
  I see the steady gain of man.
                                        WHITTIER.

The subject of this volume seems a little appalling for children, but
it is treated in so remarkable a manner and with such simplicity that
the book should be in the hands of all young people. It is not
surprising to learn that it has been translated into many languages.


ECKSTORM, F. (H.).
               The Bird Book.
               Heath. .60

     Illustrated with full-page woodcuts and figures in the text.
     Written in popular style; chapters on Water-Birds in their Homes;
     Structure and Comparison; Problems of Bird-Life; Some Common
     Land-Birds. Much original matter about little-known water-birds.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.


GEIKIE, ARCHIBALD.
               Physical Geography.
               American Book. .35

Children of inquiring minds will find in this tiny volume expert
answers to their questions about the earth and its wonders.


HOLLAND, W.J.
               The Butterfly Book.
               Doubleday. 3.00

Dr. Holland, Director of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, has given us
an authoritative account of the butterfly-life of North America    (p. 159)
north of Mexico, and at the same time has kept this book entirely
within the comprehension of the unscientific nature-lover. Directions
are given for the capture, preparation, and preservation, of specimens.
There are forty-eight pages of color plates, reproducing more than a
thousand North American butterflies, and several hundred black and white
text illustrations.


INGERSOLL, ERNEST.
               The Book of the Ocean.
               Century. 1.50

Waves, tides, and currents, early exploration, war-ships and naval
battles, merchantmen, yachts and yachting, marine industries, and the
animal life of the ocean, are all discussed in this good-sized, fully
illustrated volume.


MEADOWCROFT, W.H.
               The ABC of Electricity.
               Excelsior Publishing. 50

A simple treatise on electricity and its uses in connection with the
telephone, telegraph, electric light, et cetera.


MORLEY, M.W.
               A Song of Life.
               Illustrated by the Author and Robert Forsyth.
               McClurg. 1.25

How few thoughtful parents have not been perplexed by the question of
when and how best to tell their children the great truths of the
beginning and development of life in the world of nature. Miss     (p. 160)
Morley is well qualified to treat this most difficult subject, which
she does delicately and reverently, from a scientific standpoint. As
there is so great a difference of opinion as to the advisability of
giving books of this nature to adolescent boys and girls, it is strongly
recommended that this one be carefully read beforehand by the parent.


ST. JOHN, T.M.
               How Two Boys Made Their Own Electrical Apparatus.
               St. John. 1.00

Directions for making simple electrical appliances, such as batteries
and electric bells.


STONE, WITMER, and W.E. CRAM.
               American Animals.
               Doubleday. 3.00

     A readable book, beautifully illustrated, ... and in many of its
     life-histories much fuller, fresher, and more interestingly
     written than any other work on animals that I know.
                                        DALLAS LORE SHARP.

     In preparing the present volume the aim has been to produce a
     work sufficiently free from technicalities to appeal to the
     general reader and at the same time to include such scientific
     information relative to our North American mammals as would be
     desired by one beginning their study.--_Preface._

The illustrations which accompany these descriptions of the mammals of
North America north of Mexico comprise six plates in color from
paintings by A.B. Dugmore, and ninety-four half-tones from         (p. 161)
remarkable photographs from life by Messrs. Dugmore, Carlin, Beebe,
and other expert nature-photographers. Some of the photographs were
taken in the New York and Washington Zooelogical Parks, and some in the
open.



STORIES

     The best romance becomes dangerous if by its excitement it
     renders the ordinary course of life uninteresting, and increases
     the morbid thirst for scenes in which we shall never be called on
     to act.
                                        RUSKIN.


ALCOTT, L.M.
               Little Women.
               Illustrated by Alice Barber Stephens.
               Little. 2.00

Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy, are as great favorites with the girls of this
generation as they were with their mothers. The book gives a picture
drawn from the youthful days of Miss Alcott and her sisters, and its
sweet natural home atmosphere and high standards make it one that
should be read by every little woman of to-day.


ALDRICH, T.B.
               *The Story of a Bad Boy.
               Illustrated by A.B. Frost.
               Houghton. 2.00

     "This is the story of a bad boy. Well, not such a very bad, but a
     pretty bad boy; and I ought to know, for I am, or rather I was,
     that boy myself."

This much loved volume should be put in the hands of every         (p. 162)
American lad. Mr. Frost's illustrations are delightfully sympathetic.


BENNETT, JOHN.
               Master Skylark.
               Century. 1.50

A sweet fresh tale of the days when Will Shakspere trod the boards.
Little Nicholas Attwood joins a company of actors, and the head
player, dubbing him Master Skylark because of his wonderful voice,
takes him with them to London against his will. Good Master Shakspere,
however, helps him in time of need, and little Nick gets safely home
again to his mother in Stratford town.


BROOKS, NOAH.
               The Boy Emigrants.
               Scribner. 1.25

An account of an overland trip to California in 1849.

     The scenery of the book is all taken from nature; many of the
     characters were real people; and almost all the incidents which
     here befall the Boy Emigrants came under my own observation, or
     under that of people whom I knew on the trail or in California.
                                        NOAH BROOKS.


CANAVAN, M.J.
               Ben Comee.
               Macmillan. 1.50

This eighteenth-century Colonial narrative gives a vivid description
of Roger's Rangers. The Rangers were for the most part New         (p. 163)
Hampshire frontiersmen.


COOLIDGE, SUSAN (Pseudonym of S.C. WOOLSEY).
               What Katy Did at School.
               Little. 1.25

The sequel to What Katy Did tells of the boarding-school days of Katy
and Clover Carr. While the story is interesting and amusing, it is at
the same time an advantage to any girl to make the acquaintance of
these two delightful sisters, with their simple honorable standards.


COOPER, J.F.
               The Deerslayer.
               Houghton. 1.25

     "The incidents of this tale occurred between the years 1740 and
     1745.... Broad belts of the virgin wilderness ... affording forest
     covers to the noiseless moccasin of the native warrior, as he
     trod the secret and bloody war-path."

Cooper's style is, according to present-day standards, somewhat
pompous and stilted, but all boys should read this account of the New
York settlers' warfare against the Iroquois and know Deerslayer, the
picturesque frontiersman.

  And Natty won't go to oblivion quicker
  Than Adams the parson or Primrose the vicar.
                                        LOWELL.


COOPER, J.F.
               The Last of the Mohicans.
               Houghton. 1.25

     Story of the French and Indian war. It tells of the siege     (p. 164)
     of Fort William Henry, the capture of two young girls by the
     Indians, and the adventures of an English officer while trying
     to rescue them. Hawk-eye the scout and Uncas, the last of the
     Mohicans, are two of the other characters.
                                        CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH.


EGGLESTON, G.C.
               The Last of the Flatboats.
               Lothrop. 1.50

The adventures of five boys on a trip down the Mississippi at the time
of a great flood. The tone of the book is manly.


FORBES, C.B.
               Elizabeth's Charm-String.
               Little. 1.50

Elizabeth's aunt brings home from Europe various tiny symbols relating
to different famous places, buildings, and paintings. The legends
connected with them are told to a group of eager girls.


FRENCH, H.W.
               @The Lance of Kanana.
               Lothrop. 1.00

This Arab tale of a Bedouin boy of many years ago is so instinct with
splendid patriotism that it is difficult to characterize it as sad,
though in the end Kanana gives up his life for Allah and Arabia. A
graphic picture of Oriental life, full of exciting experiences.


HUGHES, THOMAS.                                                    (p. 165)
               Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby.
               Illustrated by E.J. Sullivan.
               Macmillan. 2.00

The one great story of school-boy life, telling of days at Rugby under
the famous Dr. Arnold, and revealing the spiritual influence of a
great master.


INMAN, HENRY.
               The Ranche on the Oxhide.
               Macmillan. 1.50

     Tale of pioneer days in Kansas when wolves and panthers,
     buffaloes and Indians, were familiar sights to the ranchman.
     Buffalo Bill and General Custer appear in the story.
                                        CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH.

     Colonel Inman served under Generals Custer, Gibbs, Sully, and
     other famous Indian fighters, of whose staffs he was a member.
     Over forty years on the extreme frontier gave him a rare
     opportunity to study the Indian character.--_National Cyclopaedia
     of American Biography._


JANVIER, T.A.
               The Aztec Treasure House.
               Harper. 1.50

The scene of these stirring adventures is laid in Mexico of the
present day, and the heroes, a little band of plucky men, penetrate to
the heart of an unknown Aztec city. The well-written narrative is so
full of exciting happenings that it is a favorable substitute for the
ordinary sensational volume in which many boys find delight.


KIPLING, RUDYARD.                                                  (p. 166)
               Captains Courageous.
               Century. 1.50

An indulged lad, the son of rich parents, falls overboard from a
transatlantic steamer and is rescued by the crew of a fishing-smack
off the Banks of Newfoundland. The boy has to stay with the men and
make himself useful until the fishing season is over. The hardy life
of the sea makes a man of him by the time he is restored to his
parents.

  "Now Aprile is over and melted the snow,
  And outer Noo Bedford we shortly must tow;
  Yes, out o' Noo Bedford we shortly must clear,
  We're the whalers that never see wheat in the ear."


MARTINEAU, HARRIET.
               Feats on the Fiord.
               Macmillan. .50

A vivid picture of Norwegian life of the eighteenth century. Full of
action and interest, and conveying much information as to Northern
ways and customs in such a manner that it becomes a part of the story.


MARTINEAU, HARRIET.
               The Peasant and the Prince.
               Houghton. .40

     Whatever we may think of the literary quality of Miss Martineau's
     work, the practical achievements of her life were remarkable....
     The Peasant and the Prince is a good example of her method. It is
     a sketch of the condition of French society just before the
     outbreak of the Revolution. Only the first part can be called
     fiction, and that only in a superficial sense.... So deep a   (p. 167)
     sympathy, so passionate an earnestness, informs much of her work,
     that it is still worth reading for its own sake as well as for the
     sake of the distinguished woman who produced it.
                                        H.W. BOYNTON.

The book is extremely interesting.


MATTHEWS, BRANDER.
               Tom Paulding.
               Century. 1.50

The description of a successful, yet unsuccessful, search for buried
treasure in the streets of New York will satisfy in a harmless way the
desire which all normal boys have for books of this character.


MUNROE, KIRK.
               The Flamingo Feather.
               Harper. .60

The exciting experiences of a French lad during the settlement of
Florida by France in the sixteenth century. Many incidents hinge on
the faithful friendship existing between a young Indian and the hero.


PYLE, HOWARD.
               Men of Iron.
               Harper. 2.00

A historical story of the time of Henry IV, giving an account of the
training and knighting of Myles Falworth, and of his struggle as
champion for his old blind father in the ordeal by battle; of Prince
Hal, and the wild hard days that bred fighting men.


SHAW, F.L.                                                         (p. 168)
               Castle Blair.
               Little. 1.00

This charming picture of child-life on an Irish estate was highly
commended by Ruskin in these words: There is a quite lovely little
book just come out about children, Castle Blair!... The book is good,
and lovely, and true, having the best description of a noble child in
it (Winnie) that I ever read; and nearly the best description of the
next best thing--a noble dog.


SMITH, M.P. (W.).
               More Good Times at Hackmatack.
               Little. 1.25

A further account of farm life in Western Massachusetts begun in Jolly
Good Times at Hackmatack.

  Sit with me by the homestead hearth,
  And stretch the hands of memory forth
  To warm them at the wood-fire's blaze!
                                        WHITTIER.

     To fear God, do your duty, tell the truth, and be
     industrious--this was the New England ideal; and until we can
     replace it by a better, we can hardly afford to belittle
     it.--_Preface._


STEIN, EVALEEN.
               Gabriel and the Hour Book.
               Page. 1.00

This simply-told story presents in a charming way a sketch of French
life in the reign of Louis XII. It tells of how little Gabriel helped
Brother Stephen to illuminate a wonderful Book of Hours for the King
to give as a wedding gift to Anne of Brittany, and of the          (p. 169)
happiness that came to the faithful workers therefrom.


STOCKTON, F.R.
               The Story of Viteau.
               Scribner. 1.50

A tale of two French lads, the sons of the Countess of Viteau, who
lived in the rude days of Louis IX. Many of the duties and pleasures
of mediaeval life are incidentally described.


THOMPSON, A.R.
               Gold-Seeking on the Dalton Trail.
               Little. 1.50

These adventures of two New England boys in Alaska and the Northwest
Territory are based on real happenings. The scenery of the region is
described, and useful information given about the Klondike, and its
flora and fauna.


TRUE, J.P.
               The Iron Star.
               Little. 1.50

The iron star was a meteor, whose story is that of the ages from the
days of the Cavemen to the time of Miles Standish.


TWAIN, MARK (Pseudonym of S.L. Clemens).
               The Prince and the Pauper.
               Harper. 1.75

This never-was-but-might-have-been story is truly one "for young
people of all ages." It tells of the exchange of station which
occurred between young Edward Prince of Wales and Tom Canty the    (p. 170)
beggar's son. Tom grows to like the stately life, but the noble
young prince learns many a bitter truth about his realm. We are glad
for both boys when the latter, now King Edward VI, comes to his own
again. The author follows closely the life and customs of the day.

In spite of the main incident and its consequences being historically
factitious, the tale presents a vivid picture of the young King and
his people, and the London of that time.




_THIRTEEN YEARS OF AGE_                                            (p. 171)

  _Where go the children? Travelling! Travelling!
  Where go the children, travelling ahead?
  Some go to conquer things; some go to try them;
  Some go to dream them; and some go to bed._
                                        RILEY.



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

     To a young heart everything is fun.
                                        DICKENS.


HASLUCK, P.N. (Editor).
               Knotting and Splicing Ropes and Cordage.
               Cassell. .50

A comprehensive little book on a subject about which all boys are
anxious to know something. There are many illustrations.


WELLS, CAROLYN.
               Rainy Day Diversions.
               Moffat. 1.00

Uncle Robert explains arithmetical puzzles, and card and other tricks.
There are suggestions for celebrating the different holidays, and two
children's plays are given.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT                                 (p. 172)

  Where'er a single slave doth pine,
  Where'er one man may help another--
  Thank God for such a birthright, brother--
  That spot of earth is thine and mine!
  There is the true man's birthplace grand,
  His is a world-wide fatherland!
                                 LOWELL.


BOLTON, S.E. (K).
               Lives of Girls Who Became Famous.
               Crowell. 1.50

The achievements of nineteen women of note are briefly recounted.
Among the number are Harriet Beecher Stowe, Maria Mitchell, Madame de
Stael, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Florence Nightingale. An
encouraging book for ambitious girls.


CHURCH, A.J.
               Stories of the East from Herodotus.
               Dodd. 1.00

The Father of History tells us of Croesus, his war with and defeat by
the Persians; of Cyrus and his triumphs; of certain kings of Egypt and
the manners of the people; of Cambyses and the Persian conquest; of
the False Smerdis; and of Darius, lord of all Asia.


DRAKE, F.S.
               Indian History for Young Folks.
               Harper. 3.00

This standard work gives a general account of the North American   (p. 173)
Indian, and of our various wars with the different tribes to recent
times. There are maps and many illustrations.


GRIFFIS, W.E.
               Young People's History of Holland.
               Houghton. 1.50

     Every American should know the history of the Netherlands, the
     fatherland of millions of Americans and the storehouse of
     precedents in federal government from which those who made our
     nation borrowed most freely. Nowhere in Europe, except in
     England, can one find the origin of so much that is deepest and
     best in our national life--including the highest jewel of
     civilization, religious liberty--as in Holland, as John Adams and
     Benjamin Franklin long ago confessed.--_Preface._

The satisfactory illustrations to this excellent book are taken from
old prints.


HART, A.B., and A.B. CHAPMAN (Editors).
               How Our Grandfathers Lived.
               Macmillan. .60

     This volume relates chiefly to the first half of the nineteenth
     century. Our grandfathers and even our fathers passed lives full
     of interest and of unusual incidents: the school, the field, the
     forest, the hunt, the stagecoach, and the steamboat, are already
     remote from our present generation.... Special pains have been
     taken to illustrate the remarkable life of the Western frontier,
     now fast becoming a tradition.--_Preface._

Girls will enjoy the informal letters, describing the customs and
costumes at the English Court, as well as those of our own land.


HIGGINSON, T.W.                                                    (p. 174)
               Young Folks' History of the United States.
               Longmans. 1.00

There are many histories of our country to choose from, but none is
more satisfactory for young people than this, with its choice language
and interesting style. It contains maps and numerous illustrations.

     It will be noticed that less space than usual is given, in these
     pages, to the events of war, and more to the affairs of peace.
     This course has been deliberately pursued.... Times of peace, the
     proverb says, have few historians; but this may be more the fault
     of the historians than of the times.--_Preface._


KIEFFER, H.M.
               The Recollections of a Drummer-Boy.
               Houghton. 1.50

     The author was drummer-boy during the Civil War in the 150th
     regiment of Pennsylvania volunteers, and he tells his own
     experiences in camp and on the battlefield from the time of his
     enlistment to the "muster-out."
                                        CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH.


LANIER, SIDNEY (Editor).
               The Boy's Froissart.
               Scribner. 2.00

These tales, which retain to a considerable extent the archaic style
of the original, will interest only the exceptional boy or girl.


PARTON, JAMES.
               Captains of Industry.
               Houghton. Two volumes. 2.50

The careers of successful business men who had aims beyond mere    (p. 175)
money-getting. Among those told of are Elihu Burritt, Henry
Bessemer, Sir William Phips, and Ezra Cornell.


SCOTT, WALTER.
               Tales of a Grandfather.
               Edited by Edwin Ginn.
               Ginn. .40

This well-known book gives the history of Scotland from the earliest
period to the close of the reign of James V.

     The present work has been slightly abridged by the omission of
     detailed descriptions of some of the more barbarous cruelties of
     those times and other unimportant matter. The story unimpaired
     has been given in Scott's own language.--_Preface._


SCUDDER, H.E.
               George Washington.
               Houghton. .75

A reliable conservative biography. It is not only a historical
portrait, but a picture of eighteenth-century colonial life in
Virginia.


THE SHIP OF STATE, BY THOSE AT THE HELM.
               Ginn. .40

Twelve articles describing the life and duties of the servants of the
nation. Among the subjects included are The Presidency, by Roosevelt;
The Life of a Senator, by Lodge; How Jack Lives, by Long; Good Manners
and Diplomacy, by Day; The American Post Office, by Wilson.


TAPPAN, E.M.                                                       (p. 176)
               In the Days of Queen Victoria.
               Lothrop. 1.00

The celebrated reign of the good queen is faithfully portrayed.

  Queen, as true to womanhood as Queenhood,
  Glorying in the glories of her people,
  Sorrowing with the sorrows of the lowest!
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  Henry's fifty years are all in shadow,
  Gray with distance Edward's fifty summers,
  Ev'n her Grandsire's fifty half forgotten.
                                        TENNYSON.


WHITE, J.S. (Editor).
               The Boys' and Girls' Plutarch.
               Putnam. 1.75

     Plutarch wrote a hundred books and was never dull. Most of these
     have been lost, but the portions which remain have found, with
     the exception of Holy Writ, more readers through eighteen
     centuries than the works of any other writer of ancient
     times.--_Introduction._

If any substitute for a full translation is desired, this abridgment
will serve. It is illustrated.


WRIGHT, H.C.
               Children's Stories of the Great Scientists.
               Scribner. 1.25

Miss Wright's language is picturesque and interesting. These sixteen
chapters on the famous scientists from Galileo to Darwin and Huxley
will fascinate intelligent children.


ZIMMERN, ALICE.
               Greek History for Young Readers.
               Longmans. 1.00

A simple, scholarly history; the English excellent. There are maps (p. 177)
and many uncommonly good illustrations.



FINE ARTS

  Where gripinge grefes the hart would wounde,
  And dolefulle dumps the mynde oppresse,
  There musicke with her silver-sound
  With spede is wont to send redresse.
                                        Attributed to RICHARD EDWARDS.


CHAMPLIN, J.D.
               The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Literature and Art.
               Holt. 3.00

     In this an attempt has been made to give a brief account of the
     acknowledged masterpieces in literature and in art, the latter
     term being understood to include architecture, sculpture,
     painting, and music.--_Preface._

Short descriptions of great books, popular fairy tales, notable
characters and objects in fiction, celebrated buildings, statues,
pictures, and operas, are included in this fully illustrated volume.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

  When all the world is young, lad,
  And all the trees are green;
  And every goose a swan, lad,
  And every lass a queen:
  Then hey for boot and horse, lad,
  And round the world away;
  Young blood must have its course, lad,
  And every dog his day.
                                        KINGSLEY.


DANA, R.H.                                                         (p. 178)
               Two Years Before the Mast.
               Houghton. 1.00

     It does not often happen that a young man of twenty-five writes a
     book which becomes a classic in the language.... Yet this is the
     history of Dana's Two Years before the Mast.--_Biographical
     Sketch._

The author, a boy of nineteen, left Harvard College in 1834 and
shipped as a sailor, hoping by this open-air life to cure a serious
weakness of the eyes. He sailed around Cape Horn, coasted along the
California shore, and returned home by the same route.


EASTMAN, C.A.
               Indian Boyhood.
               Illustrated by E.L. Blumenschein.
               Doubleday. 1.60

Dr. Eastman is himself a Sioux, and this account is the record of his
own youth among this wild people when their warriors went on the
warpath against the "Big Knives," and his highest ambition was to join
them.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.
               India.
               Illustrated by Mortimer Menpes.
               Macmillan. .75

We journey to the court of a native prince, travel through the
bazaars, and visit village, jungle, and even the great Himalayas
themselves. The book is particularly interesting, because India is
less well known to young people than many other lands. Of the twelve
colored pictures, two are specially good,--a tailor at work, and a (p. 179)
Sikh warrior.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.
               Japan.
               Illustrated by Ella du Cane.
               Macmillan. .75

The volume is devoted rather to the habits, manners, and customs, of
this wonderful people than to a description of the country itself. Boy
and girl life, games, feast-days, the occupations of a Japanese day,
the police, and the soldier, are told about in an entertaining manner.
There are eight plates in color.


JENKS, TUDOR.
               The Boy's Book of Explorations.
               Doubleday. 2.00

A satisfactory introduction to exploration in general, and a
comprehensive account of the travel and discovery of recent times in
Africa, Asia, and Australia. The journeys of Livingstone, Stanley, and
many other well-known African explorers, are related; Rockhill's
adventures in Tibet; the experiences of Hedin and Landor; and the
opening up of Australia. The beauty of Livingstone's character is
dwelt upon. Maps and many illustrations add to the book's value.


LANG, JOHN.
               The Story of Captain Cook.
               Dutton. .50

A brief life of England's great explorer, giving details of his three
famous voyages and his tragic end. There are eight pictures in color.


LEE, YAN PHOU.                                                     (p. 180)
               When I was a Boy in China.
               Lothrop. .75

This informing sketch of Chinese boyhood is by a native who left home
at the age of twelve years to be educated in the United States.


PARKMAN, FRANCIS.
               The Oregon Trail.
               Illustrated by Frederic Remington.
               Little. 2.00

Valuable not only as literature, but in that it gives the personal
experiences of an intelligent observer in crossing the plains, long
before the building of a trans-continental railway. Parkman made this
trip in 1846.

     The Wild West is tamed, and its savage charms have withered. If
     this book can help to keep their memory alive, it will have done
     its part. It has found a powerful helper in the pencil of Mr.
     Remington, whose pictures are as full of truth as of spirit, for
     they are the work of one who knew the prairies and the mountains
     before irresistible commonplace had subdued them.--_Preface to
     the Illustrated Edition._


PLUMMER, M.W.
               Roy and Ray in Canada.
               Holt. 1.75

     "This companion volume to Roy and Ray in Mexico embodies much
     that is interesting concerning Canadian history, manners, and
     customs.... The book will be useful as a travel guide, but it is
     primarily intended to cover a hitherto neglected field for
     children." Illustrated from photographs, with map, and words and
     music of Canadian national songs.

Our old friends Roy and Ray enjoyed their trip through Eastern     (p. 181)
Canada, and so will the boys and girls who join them on their travels.


STARR, FREDERICK.
               American Indians.
               Heath. .45

Mr. Starr, an acknowledged authority, tells us of many different
Indian tribes; their language, customs, picture-writing, dances, and
ceremonies. The author has himself had acquaintance with some thirty
tribes. The book is very fully and satisfactorily illustrated.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

  Those that Hobgoblin call you and sweet Puck,
  You do their work, and they shall have good luck.
                                        SHAKSPERE.


KIPLING, RUDYARD.
               Puck of Pook's Hill.
               Illustrated by Arthur Rackham.
               Doubleday. 1.50

To Dan and Una, sitting, on Midsummer's Eve, in the old fairy ring,
appears Puck. By his magic power on this and succeeding visits
incidents based on events in Old England's history are told to the
children by those who shared in them. A series of remarkable stories,
alternating with even more remarkable poems. The average child will
better enjoy hearing them read aloud, as they presuppose a fuller  (p. 182)
knowledge of English history than most American children are likely
to possess. Mr. Rackham's pictures in color are fine work.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM
GREAT AUTHORS

  Olympian bards who sung
    Divine ideas below,
  Which always find us young
    And always keep us so.
                                        EMERSON.


LANG, ANDREW.
               The Blue Poetry Book.
               Longmans. 2.00

     The Editor trusts that this book may be a guide into romance and
     fairy-land to many children.... By way of lending no aid to what
     is called Education, very few notes have been added. The child
     does not want everything to be explained; in the unexplained is
     great pleasure. Nothing, perhaps, crushes the love of poetry more
     surely and swiftly than the use of poems as
     schoolbooks.--_Introduction._

This excellent collection, for the most part British verse, contains a
large proportion of Scotch songs and ballads. The productions of
contemporary poets are not included.


LANIER, SIDNEY.
              The Boy's Percy.
              Scribner. 2.00

     Old Ballads of War, Adventure, and Love, from Bishop Thomas   (p. 183)
     Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry.--_Title-page._

     But, passing far beyond the plans of these small antiquarian
     pleasures, Percy's book immediately enriched our whole ordinary
     existence by making common property of those golden figures which
     the undying ballad-maker had enameled into the solid tissue of
     English life.... Each ballad is given here exactly as it stands
     in the original except that the spelling has been modernized and
     such parts cut away as cleanliness required.--_Introduction._


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume VI.
               Masterpieces of Literature.
               Heath. .55

     The worth of the masterpieces of any art increases with use and
     familiarity of association. They grow fresher by custom; and the
     love of them deepens in proportion to the time we have known
     them, and to the memories with which they have become
     invested.--_Preface._


REPPLIER, AGNES (Editor).
               A Book of Famous Verse.
               Houghton. 1.25

     In selecting these few poems I have had no other motive than to
     give pleasure to the children who may read them; and I have tried
     to study their tastes, and feelings, and
     desires.--_Introduction._

Though issued in 1892, Miss Repplier's excellent collection still
holds its own among the very best, because of the high quality and
interest of the poems chosen. The little book is of a most convenient
size to carry about with one.



RELIGION AND ETHICS                                                (p. 184)

  Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he
  That every man in arms should wish to be?
  --It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought
  Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
  Upon the plan that pleased his boyish thought:
  Whose high endeavors are an inward light
  That makes the path before him always bright.
                                        WORDSWORTH.


CARRUTH, W.H.
               Letters to American Boys.
               American Unitarian Association. .80

Uncle William (who in real life is Vice Chancellor of the University
of Kansas) has a series of clear-headed talks with the boys on
reading, sports, manners, various professions, and politics. He is
never patronizing, and always has the boy's point of view in mind.


GILLIE, R.C.
               The Kinsfolk and Friends of Jesus.
               Macmillan. 2.25

This sequel to The Story of Stories, is told in simple language. The
illustrations, part of them in color, are from famous paintings.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS                 (p. 185)

     Science is, like virtue, its own exceeding great reward.
                                        KINGSLEY.


BAKER, R.S.
               Boy's Second Book of Inventions.
               Doubleday. 1.60

This second volume is like unto the first in giving accounts of recent
marvellous discoveries and inventions, such as radium, flying
machines, and the seismograph, used in the measurement of earthquakes.
It is fully illustrated.


BLANCHAN, NELTJE (Pseudonym of Mrs. N.B. (DEG.) Doubleday).
               Birds That Hunt and Are Hunted.
               Doubleday. 2.00

     Illustrated with full-page color plates. Non-technical. Birds
     grouped according to size and color; no specific color key.
     Rather full biographies. There are chapters giving the
     characteristics of the families, the habitats, and the seasons of
     occurrence.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.

One hundred and seventy birds of prey, game birds, and water-fowls,
are described. The color plates are forty-eight in number.


DICKERSON, M.C.
               The Frog Book.
               Doubleday. 4.00

     "The original manuscript for this book concerned Toads and    (p. 186)
     Frogs of Northeastern North America only.... Brief accounts
     of the species of other parts of North America were added later."

There are sixteen pages of color plates and nearly three hundred
half-tones from photographs from life by the author. The wonderful
transformation of the tadpole is fully described.


GOOD, ARTHUR.
               Magical Experiments.
               McKay. 1.25

Some of the wonders here described are intended merely for amusement,
others are of a scientific character and designed to act as an
introduction to the study of Physics. No apparatus is needed beyond
the simple articles, such as knives, forks, and plates, which every
household possesses. The book is instructive and entertaining alike to
experimenter and observer.


HEILPRIN, ANGELO.
               The Animal Life of Our Sea-shore.
               Lippincott. 1.25

An authoritative manual, prepared with special reference to the New
Jersey coast and the Southern shore of Long Island. It is fully
illustrated.


HOWARD, L.O.
               The Insect Book.
               Doubleday. 3.00

Dr. Howard, Chief of the Division of Entomology, United States
Department of Agriculture, and the foremost authority in this      (p. 187)
country, gives us full life-histories of the bees, wasps, ants,
grasshoppers, flies, and other North American insects--exclusive of
the butterflies, moths, and beetles. A separate section is devoted to
the subject of collecting and preserving the different specimens.
There are sixteen pages of color plates, thirty-two pages of
half-tones, and about three hundred black and white text
illustrations.


MOFFETT, CLEVELAND.
               Careers of Danger and Daring.
               Century. 1.50

     Vivid accounts of the courage and achievements of
     steeple-climbers, deep-sea divers, balloonists, ocean and river
     pilots, bridge-builders, firemen, acrobats, wild-beast trainers,
     locomotive engineers, and the men who handle dynamite.
                                        CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH.


MORLEY, M.W.
               Grasshopper Land.
               McClurg. 1.25

Not only the grasshoppers but other family members of the Orthoptera
are here described, including mantes, walking-sticks, katydids, and
crickets. There is a long and interesting account of locusts and their
migrations. The text illustrations are many and satisfactory.

  The poetry of earth is never dead:
  When all the birds are faint with the hot sun,
  And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run
  From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead.
  That is the grasshopper's--he takes the lead                     (p. 188)
  In summer luxury--he has never done
  With his delights, for when tired out with fun,
  He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed.
                                        KEATS.


PARSONS, F.T. (S.) (formerly MRS. W.S. DANA).
               How to Know the Wild Flowers.
               Scribner. 2.00

     Every flower-lover who has spent weary hours puzzling over a
     botanical key in the efforts to name unknown plants will welcome
     this satisfactory book, which stands ready to lead him to the
     desired knowledge by a royal road. The book is well fitted to the
     need of many who have no botanical knowledge and yet are
     interested in wild flowers.--_The Nation._

The primary characteristic of this guide to the names, haunts, and
habits, of our common wild flowers is that, in moderate compass, it
groups and describes them under their different colors. This
arrangement was suggested by a passage in one of John Burroughs's
Talks about Flowers. There are indices to the Latin and English names
and to technical terms. The forty-eight full-page colored and one
hundred and ten black and white illustrations are of value.


ST. JOHN, T.M.
               Real Electric Toy-Making for Boys.
               St. John. 1.00

Sufficient directions for making and using many simple electric toys.


SHALER, N.S.                                                       (p. 189)
               A First Book in Geology.
               Heath. .60

It is difficult to see how this subject could be made more interesting
to beginners. The fully illustrated volume is of a handy size to be
carried on geological tramps.



STORIES

     The first time I read an excellent book, it is to me just as if I
     had gained a new friend. When I read over a book I have perused
     before, it resembles the meeting with an old one.
                                        GOLDSMITH.


ALCOTT, L.M.
               Little Men.
               Illustrated by R.B. Birch.
               Little. 2.00

This sequel to Little Women tells of the home school which Jo and her
husband loved and worked for, and from which they sent out into the
world, as men, the boys who had sorely needed their loving care.


BARBOUR, R.H.
               For the Honor of the School.
               Appleton. 1.50

A satisfactory account of modern boarding-school life. Its standards
are good and its tone healthy and sound. There are descriptions of a
cross-country race, a foot-ball game, a base-ball match, and
interscholastic track athletics. Lads, however, enjoy the writings of
this author to such an extent that many, doubtless, read them to   (p. 190)
the exclusion of more worthy books.


BARBOUR, R.H.
               Four in Camp.
               Appleton. 1.50

The compiler of this List believes that young people as well as old
occasionally wish for light literature. This story of vacation days
spent in a summer camp for boys in the New Hampshire woods is
pleasantly diverting. Its standards make for self-control, courage,
honesty, and good-fellowship.


CHURCH, A.J.
              A Young Macedonian in the Army of Alexander the Great.
              Putnam. 1.25

Young folks of today will like to read of the lad who took part in the
great struggle between Macedonia and Persia. Alexander's visit to
Jerusalem, recorded by Josephus, is related, and mention is made of
Demosthenes and Diogenes.


COOPER, J.F.
               The Pilot.
               Houghton. 1.00

From the boy's point of view, any legitimate need for concealment
gives an added charm to a narrative, and this account of the secret
expedition of John Paul Jones to the English coast is no exception.


COOPER, J.F.                                                       (p. 191)
               The Spy.
               Houghton. 1.00

     Story of the Revolution and the "neutral grounds" around White
     Plains. The hero, the spy, is a cool, shrewd, fearless man, who
     is employed by General Washington in service which involves great
     personal hazard.
                                        CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH.


COTES, S.J. (D.).
               The Story of Sonny Sahib.
               Appleton. 1.00

The experiences of a little English boy saved, when a baby, by his
ayah, at the time of the Cawnpore Massacre, and brought up at the
court of the Maharajah of Lalpore. Learning that the English are about
to attack the city, Sonny seeks his countrymen, refusing however to
give any information in regard to the Maharajah's defenses. In the
camp he finds his father, Colonel Starr.


DIX, B.M.
               Merrylips.
               Macmillan. 1.50

The adventures of a little Cavalier maiden during the civil wars that
led to the establishment of Cromwell. Merrylips, who had always wished
to be a lad, is obliged to wander in the disguise of boy's clothing,
and through her experiences learns to prefer to be herself, Mistress
Sybil Venner. In all her vicissitudes she proves herself a steadfast
servant of the King. While the book pictures the rude times of war,
the charm of womanliness is emphasized throughout.


DIX, B.M.                                                          (p. 192)
               Soldier Rigdale.
               Macmillan. 1.50

An account of Mayflower days and the founding of the Plymouth colony.
Miles Rigdale and little Dolly lose both mother and father. Dolly is
brought up by Mistress Brewster, while Miles finally goes to live with
Captain Standish. This faithful relation of the privations our
ancestors endured ends with the arrival of the ship Fortune with
reinforcements for the colony.


EWING, J.H.
               Jackanapes.
               Daddy Darwin's Dovecot.
               The Story of a Short Life.
               With a sketch of her life by her sister, H.K.F. Gatty.
               Little. .50

@JACKANAPES.

We love the golden-haired army baby who lived to fight and die with
glory for Old England. The atmosphere of the tale is most charming.

DADDY DARWIN'S DOVECOT.

In the beautiful English country dwell old Daddy Darwin and Jack
March, the little workhouse boy. A delightful anecdote is told about
the pigeons, of whom Jack says, "I love them tumblers as if they was
my own."

@THE STORY OF A SHORT LIFE.

The inspiring story of the life of a boy--a short life filled with
glorious bravery. This English army sketch is so sad that it should be
read by the parent before deciding to give it to a child.


FRENCH, ALLEN.                                                     (p. 193)
               Heroes of Iceland.
               Little. 1.50

Iceland in the tenth century is pictured for us in this adaptation
from Sir George Webbe Dasent's translation of The Story of Burnt
Njal--the Njal's Saga. It was this century that saw the change of
faith of a brave heathen people.

     But at the same time, during their long winters, the Icelanders
     wrote the tales of their own early times, which are still too
     little known. This book contains the greatest of them, a saga or
     story which is to be compared, in interest and beauty, with the
     great epics of the earlier races.--_Preface._


FRENCH, ALLEN.
               Pelham and His Friend Tim.
               Little. 1.50

The affectionate fellowship of two boys, the son of the owner of a
mill and the son of one of the workmen. A mill strike is the principal
incident of this wholesome story.


GOSS, W.L.
               Jed.
               Crowell. .75

     The incidents of the book are real ones, drawn in part from the
     writer's personal experiences and observations, as a soldier of
     the Union, during that war. He is also indebted, to many comrades
     for reminiscences of battle and prison life.--_Preface._

The simple bravery of this boy-soldier will stimulate the latent
courage and patriotism of the boys of our day. They will like the
scene where Dick and Jed join the army as drummer-boys, taking     (p. 194)
with them Mink, Jed's "awful nice dog," who could do all sorts of
cunning tricks.


GREENE, HOMER.
               The Blind Brother.
               Crowell. .50

A narrative of the experiences of two little boys in the Pennsylvania
coal mines. The sketch, which treats of an unusual subject and is full
of stirring interest, took the first prize, offered by _The Youth's
Companion._


HALE, E.E.
               @The Man Without a Country.
               Little. .75

     The story of Philip Nolan was written in the darkest period of
     the Civil War, to show what love of country is.--_Introduction._

Nolan cursed his native land and wished that he might never hear of
her again, and for fifty years his wish was fulfilled.


HAMP, S.F.
               Dale and Fraser, Sheepmen.
               Wilde. 1.50

An account of Colorado sheep-raising which will interest boys greatly,
especially as there is a tale of hidden gold interwoven with that of
Western life.


HARRIS, J.C.
               On the Plantation.
               Illustrated by E.W. Kemble.
               Appleton. 1.50

This description of a Georgia boy's adventures during the Civil    (p. 195)
War gives an unexaggerated picture of plantation life.


NASH, H.A.
               Polly's Secret.
               Little. 1.50

Polly was a staunch little Maine girl of the long-ago days. She held
an important trust sacred for many years, proving herself of sterling
worth.


PYLE, HOWARD.
               The Story of Jack Ballister's Fortunes.
               Century. 2.00

This exciting narrative of Colonial days tells of the notorious pirate
Blackbeard and also of the kidnapping and transporting from England to
the Southern colonies which was so common during the first half of the
eighteenth century. A thread of romance runs through the story.


STEVENSON, R.L.
               Treasure Island.
               Illustrated by Wal Paget.
               Scribner. 1.25

Stevenson's fascinating tale of adventure is already a classic.
Nothing of the sort, perhaps, since Robinson Crusoe, has so appealed
to both old boys and young ones.


THANET, OCTAVE (Pseudonym of Alice French).
               We All.
               Appleton. 1.50

A good picture of boy and girl life on an Arkansas plantation. An
absurd Ku-klux incident and an exciting experience with counterfeiters
add to the volume's interest.


THOMPSON, A.R.                                                     (p. 196)
               Shipwrecked in Greenland.
               Little. 1.50

     With photographic illustrations of great interest. There is just
     enough story to hold together the very entertaining chapters of
     adventure--"based in part upon the experiences of that
     unfortunate expedition which, on board the steamer Miranda, came
     to grief off the coast of Greenland in the Summer of 1894."
     Manners and customs, flora and fauna, Eskimos and cameras,
     icebergs and polar bears, make this a capital book for boys and
     boys' sisters.--_The Nation._


TWAIN, MARK (Pseudonym of S.L. CLEMENS).
               The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
               Harper. 1.75

     Most of the adventures recorded in this book really occurred; one
     or two were experiences of my own, the rest those of boys who
     were schoolmates of mine. Huck Finn is drawn from life; Tom
     Sawyer also, but not from an individual--he is a combination of
     the characteristics of three boys whom I knew, and therefore
     belongs to the composite order of architecture. The odd
     superstitions touched upon were all prevalent among children and
     slaves in the West at the period of this story.--_Preface._

Boys love it, and broad-minded parents will put the volume in their
children's hands before they borrow it.


VAILE, C.M.
               The Orcutt Girls.
               Wilde. 1.50

Two sisters--ambitious in the best sense--by means of exertion manage,
by boarding themselves, to attend Merton Academy for one term. A   (p. 197)
good picture of this phase of New England life of long ago. The
tale is said to have a foundation of fact.


WIGGIN, K.D. (S.).
               Polly Oliver's Problem.
               Houghton. 1.00

Polly bravely takes care of her invalid mother, and later when left
alone helps to support herself by her beautiful gift for
story-telling. The book has a bright and helpful influence.


WIGGIN, K.D. (S.).
               Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.
               Houghton. 1.25

Rebecca is a quaint and lovable girl whose nature, full of enthusiasm,
originality, and imagination, charms all who encounter her. Mrs.
Wiggin's delightful sense of humor pervades the sketch.


WILKINS, M.E. (MRS. M.E. (W.) FREEMAN).
               In Colonial Times.
               Lothrop. .50

Little five-year-old Ann is made the bound girl of Samuel Wales, of
Braintree. After some hard experiences Ann tries to run away, but in
time she learns to love the really kind-hearted people to whose care
she has fallen, and in the end becomes the adopted daughter of Mrs.
Polly Wales. The Squire's Sixpence is a simple school story of
long-ago days.




_FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE_                                            (p. 198)

  _"God gives thee youth but once. Keep thou
  The Childlike heart that will His kingdom be;
  The soul pure-eyed that, wisdom-led, e'en now
  His blessed face shall see."_



AMUSEMENTS AND HANDICRAFT

     Let them freely feast, sing and dance, have their puppet-plays,
     hobby-horses, tabors, crowds, bagpipes, etc., play at ball, and
     barley-breaks, and what sports and recreations they like best.
     BURTON'S _Anatomy of Melancholy_.


ADAMS, J.H.
               Harper's Indoor Book for Boys.
               Harper. 1.75

This volume contains directions for work much of which is beyond the
capacity of a boy of fourteen, but it is well for him to have
something to which he can look forward. Instructions are given in
wood-carving, metal-work, clay-modelling, bookbinding, and other
occupations. The making of simple household articles and the use of
paints are taught. There are many working diagrams.


ADAMS, J.H., and Others.
               Harper's Outdoor Book for Boys.
               Harper. 1.75

An excellent handybook which provides the necessary information for
making many worthwhile articles in which boys delight, such as     (p. 199)
windmills, water-wheels, aeroplanes, boats, rafts, toboggans, and
snow-shoes; illustrated with working diagrams. There are also
directions for camping out. The compiler of this List hopes that the
article on trapping small animals may be passed over, as the little
creatures so often suffer in boyish attempts to catch them.


BLACK, ALEXANDER.
               Photography Indoors and Out.
               Houghton. .75

     This book is addressed particularly to those amateurs who, while
     they acquire their chief pleasure from the pictures as pictures,
     have sufficient respect for the study and a strong enough purpose
     toward good work to seek real knowledge of the elements of
     photography.--_Preface._

Mr. Black gives a brief history of the development of the art, and
much thorough information for those ambitious to learn. The text is
perhaps somewhat advanced for young people of fourteen.



BIOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND GOVERNMENT

  Land of our Birth, we pledge to thee
  Our love and toil in the years to be,
  When we are grown and take our place,
  As men and women with our race.

  Father in Heaven who lovest all,
  Oh help Thy children when they call;
  That they may build from age to age,
  An undefiled heritage!
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  Teach us the strength that cannot seek,                          (p. 200)
  By deed or thought, to hurt the weak;
  That, under Thee, we may possess
  Man's strength to comfort man's distress.

  Teach us Delight in simple things,
  And Mirth that has no bitter springs;
  Forgiveness free of evil done,
  And Love to all men 'neath the sun!

  Land of our Birth, our Faith our Pride,
  For whose dear sake our fathers died;
  O Motherland, we pledge to thee,
  Head, heart, and hand through the years to be!
                                        KIPLING.


BARING-GOULD, SABINE, and ARTHUR GILMAN.
               The Story of Germany.
               Putnam. 1.50

     The present volume traces the life of this powerful nation from
     the time when imperial Rome was baffled by her valiant Hermann
     down to the hour when France fell before her, and the idea of
     Empire ... became, under William the First, a power making for
     peace and strength.... The story of such a people as the Germans
     could not fail to possess intense interest for anyone; but for us
     of another branch of the Teutonic family, it has the additional
     charm that it is the history of our blood-relations.
                                        ARTHUR GILMAN.

While not intended primarily for children, this
book will be both enjoyed and appreciated by
many boys and girls of fourteen. The illustrations
are taken, to a great extent, from old sources.


BOLTON, S.E. (K.).
               Famous American Authors.
               Crowell. .75

The careers of eighteen well-known men of letters are described.   (p. 201)
Among the number are Emerson, Prescott, Hawthorne, Higginson, Gilder,
and Clemens.


CHAMPLIN, J.D.
               Young Folks' History of the War for the Union.
               Holt. 2.50

     It is, in short, a well-written and entertaining history of the
     War of the Rebellion, very fair and impartial in tone.--_The
     Nation._

A mature boy or girl of fourteen will find this reliable work useful.
The larger part of the illustrations are taken from contemporary
drawings, and there are many maps.


CHAPIN, A.A.
               Masters of Music; Their Lives and Works.
               Dodd 1.50

Twenty famous musicians are very interestingly characterized; among
them Palestrina, Mozart, Rossini, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, and Wagner.


FAMOUS ADVENTURES AND PRISON ESCAPES OF THE CIVIL WAR.
               Century. 1.50

The War Diary of a Union Woman in the South, edited by G.W. Cable,
relates experiences of the Siege of Vicksburg. Among other accounts
there is a description of Mosby's guerillas, and the tunnel escape
from Libby Prison is told by one of the Union officers who got away
and was retaken.


FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN.                                                (p. 202)
               Autobiography.
               Houghton. .60

Notwithstanding its brevity, this autobiography has doubtless been a
greater incentive to ambitious boys than any other. It is perhaps
worth noting that a prominent Japanese merchant of Boston, when a boy
in his native land, after reading the book, determined to seek his
fortune in Franklin's country, and testifies to it as one of the chief
factors in his successful career. This useful edition contains a
sketch of the great man's life from the point where his own writing
ends, drawn chiefly from his letters. There are notes and a
chronological historical table.


HART, A.B., and ELIZABETH STEVENS (Editors).
               The Romance of the Civil War.
               Macmillan. .60

     This fourth volume of Source Readers attempts to put before
     teachers and children the actualities of the Civil War period. It
     contains something of the spirit of North and South at the
     beginning of the war, and much about the life of the soldier and
     the citizen while it was going on, with some of the battle smoke
     and dust.... In this book the fathers are speaking to their
     children.--_Preface._


LARCOM, LUCY.
               A New England Girlhood.
               Houghton. .60

An account of Miss Larcom's youth up to the age of twenty-nine, which
includes her experiences as a Lowell mill-hand. It is not only a
record of the efforts of an aspiring young woman, but a picture of (p. 203)
one phase of New England life.


LOSSING, B.J.
               The Story of the United States Navy, for Boys.
               Harper. 1.75

     This little work was prepared at the suggestion of Captain S.B.
     Luce, U.S.N., the commander of the training-ship Minnesota.
     Desirous of having it correct in every particular, I submitted
     the manuscript to the Navy Department. It was returned to me with
     a letter from Commodore Earl English, U.S.N., Chief of the
     Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, to whom it was referred, in
     which he wrote: I am much pleased with your beautiful and
     instructive Story of the Navy, and I congratulate you on having
     performed a labor which will contribute so much to the pleasure
     and instruction of the youth of our country. Such a
     bright-spirited work will refresh the memory of the noble deeds
     of our departed naval heroes in the minds of the
     people.--_Preface._

The illustrations are satisfactory.


MYERS, P.V.N.
               General History.
               Ginn. 1.50

One of the best world histories for young people.

     In the present issue the book contains several fresh chapters, an
     entirely new series of colored maps, many new illustrations, and
     carefully selected lists of books for further reading at the end
     of each chapter, together with suggested topics for special
     study. The new text brings the narration of events down to the
     Peace of Portsmouth and the elections to the first Russian
     Parliament, and aims to include all the latest important results
     of discovery and scholarly research in the different historical
     fields and periods.--_Preface._


NICOLAY, HELEN.                                                    (p. 204)
               The Boys' Life of Abraham Lincoln.
               Century. 1.50

This biography, condensed from Nicolay and Hay's Short Life of
Lincoln, in part rewritten, is the best of the many prepared for young
readers.


VAN BERGEN, ROBERT.
               The Story of Russia.
               American Book. .65

The compiler knows of no altogether satisfactory history of this
country for young people. The present volume, prepared for school use,
is very informing and will serve. It ends with the humiliation of a
great people, and the Treaty of Peace made at Portsmouth in 1905.
There are maps and illustrations.


WASHINGTON, GEORGE.
               Rules of Conduct, Diary of Adventure, Letters, and Farewell
               Addresses.
               Houghton. .25

Comprises the best of what Washington has left to us in written form.



DRAMA

  Then to the well-trod stage anon,
  If _Jonsons_ learned Sock be on,
  Or sweetest Shakespear fancies childe,
  Warble his native Wood-notes wilde.
                             MILTON


SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM.
               Julius Caesar.
               Edited by W.J. Rolfe.
               American Book. .56

     The Tragedie of Julius Caesar was first published in the       (p. 205)
     Folio of 1623.... The date at which the drama was written has
     been variously fixed by the critics.... Halliwell has shown that
     it was written "in or before the year 1601." ... The only source
     from which Shakespeare appears to have derived his materials was
     Sir Thomas North's version of Plutarch's Lives.... Shakespeare
     has in this play and elsewhere shown the same penetration into
     political character and the springs of public events as into
     those of every-day life.--_Introduction._

     The merit I see in Mr. Rolfe's school editions of Shakspere's
     Plays over those most widely used in England is that Mr. Rolfe
     edits the plays as works of a poet, and not only as productions
     in Tudor English.
                                        F.J. FURNIVALL.


SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM.
               Macbeth.
               Edited by W.J. Rolfe.
               American Book. .56

     Macbeth was first printed in the folio of 1623.... It was written
     between 1604 and 1610.... Dr. Simon Forman ... saw the play
     performed "at the Globe, 1610, the 20th of April, Saturday." It
     may then have been a new play, but it is more probable, as nearly
     all the critics agree, that it was written in 1605 or 1606. The
     accession of James made Scottish subjects popular in England, and
     the tale of Macbeth and Banquo would be one of the first to be
     brought forward, as Banquo was held to be an ancestor of the new
     king. Shakespeare drew the materials for the plot of Macbeth from
     Holinshed's Chronicles of Englande, Scotlande, and Ireland....
     The story of the drama is almost wholly apocryphal. The more
     authentic history is thus summarized by Sir Walter Scott: ... As
     a king, the tyrant so much exclaimed against was, in reality, a
     firm, just, and equitable prince.--_Introduction._

     No one can examine these volumes and fail to be impressed     (p. 206)
     with the conscientious accuracy and scholarly completeness with
     which they are edited.
                                        H.H. FURNESS.


SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM.
               The Merchant of Venice.
               Edited by W.J. Rolfe.
               American Book. .56

     The plot of The Merchant of Venice is composed of two distinct
     stories: that of the bond, and that of the caskets. Both these
     fables are found in the Gesta Romanorum, a Latin compilation of
     allegorical tales, which had been translated into English as
     early as the time of Henry VI.... The Merchant of Venice is one
     of Shakespeare's most perfect works: popular to an extraordinary
     degree.... Shylock the Jew is one of the inimitable masterpieces
     of characterization which are to be found only in
     Shakespeare.--_Introduction._


SHAKESPEARE. WILLIAM.
               A Midsummer-Night's Dream.
               Doubleday. 5.00

     The Midsummer-Night's Dream is the first play which exhibits the
     imagination of Shakespeare in all its fervid and creative power;
     for though ... it may be pronounced the offspring of youth and
     inexperience, it will ever in point of fancy be considered as
     equal to any subsequent drama of the poet.
                                        DRAKE.

     To the King's Theatre, where we saw Midsummer's Night's dream,
     which I had never seen before, nor shall ever again, for it is
     the most insipid ridiculous play that ever I saw in my life.
     PEPYS' _Diary_.

Some people feel sure that it is a mistake to interfere with the play
of a child's imagination by giving him illustrated editions of     (p. 207)
great works. This opinion would be shaken by seeing these wonderful
pictures, by means of which we are indeed wafted to dreamland. There
are forty plates in color, and other illustrations.



FINE ARTS

     Then marble, soften'd into life, grew warm.
                                        POPE.


HURLL, E.M.
               Greek Sculpture.
               Houghton. .75

The Riverside Art Series contains twelve small volumes on Ancient and
Modern Art, of which four only are included in this limited list. The
very satisfactory illustrations are taken from photographs, and the
major part of each book is devoted to interpretations of the pictures.
This volume contains sixteen examples of Greek marbles, with an
introduction, which includes other information, on some
characteristics of Greek sculpture.

     Greek sculpture can be sympathetically understood only by
     catching something of the spirit which produced it. One must
     shake off the centuries and regard life with the childlike
     simplicity of the young world: one must give imagination free
     rein.--_Introduction._


HURLL, E.M.
               Michelangelo.
               Houghton. .75

We are given fifteen pictures by this great man, and his portrait. (p. 208)
There is an introduction on Michelangelo's character as an artist, an
outline table of the principal events in his life, and a list of some of
his famous Italian contemporaries, with other information.

  This is the rugged face
  Of him who won a place
  Above all kings and lords;
  Whose various skill and power
  Left Italy a dower
  No numbers can compute, no tongue translate in words.
  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .
  So stood this Angelo
  Four hundred years ago;
  So grandly still he stands,
  Mid lesser worlds of art,
  Colossal and apart,
  Like Memnon breathing songs across the desert sands.
                                        CHRISTOPHER P. CRANCH.


HURLL, E.M.
               Raphael.
               Houghton. .75

This volume contains a collection of fifteen pictures and a portrait
of himself by the master, an introduction on Raphael's character as an
artist, an outline table of the principal events in his life, and a
list of some of his famous contemporaries, as well as other
information.

     All confessed the influence of his sweet and gracious nature,
     which was so replete with excellence and so perfect in all the
     charities, that not only was he honored by men, but even by the
     very animals, who would constantly follow his steps, and always
     loved him.
                                        VASARI.


HURLL, E.M.                                                        (p. 209)
               Tuscan Sculpture.
               Houghton. .75

This book comprises sixteen examples of fifteenth-century work, with
an introduction, also containing other information, on some
characteristics of Tuscan sculpture of this period.

     The Italian sculptors of the earlier half of the fifteenth
     century are more than mere forerunners of the great masters of
     its close, and often reach perfection within the narrow limits
     which they chose to impose on their work. Their sculpture shares
     with the paintings of Botticelli and the churches of Brunelleschi
     that profound expressiveness, that intimate impress of an
     indwelling soul, which is the peculiar fascination of the art of
     Italy in that century.
                                        WALTER PATER.



GEOGRAPHY, TRAVEL, AND DESCRIPTION

     As the Spanish proverb says: "He who would bring home the wealth
     of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him." So
     it is in travelling: A man must carry knowledge with him if he
     would bring home knowledge.
                                        Dr. JOHNSON.


BRASSEY, A. (A.).
               A Voyage in the Sunbeam.
               Longmans. .75

This abridgment of the original book tells in pleasant narrative style
of the Sunbeam's voyage around the world, which lasted from July
first, 1876, to May twenty-sixth, 1877.


FINNEMORE, JOHN.                                                   (p. 210)
               Italy.
               Illustrated by Alberto Pisa and Others.
               Macmillan. .75

We travel over the Alps, and through the country to Naples and Sicily.
The wonderful cities of this historic land are described, and a brief
account given of its many poor but happy people. There are twelve
illustrations in color.


HIGGINSON, T.W. (Editor).
               Young Folks' Book of American Explorers.
               Longmans. 1.20

     It has always seemed to me that the narratives of the early
     discoverers and explorers of the American coast were as
     interesting as Robinson Crusoe, and were, indeed, very much like
     it. This has led me to make a series of extracts from these
     narratives, selecting what appeared to me the most interesting
     parts, and altering only the spelling.... One great thing which I
     have wished my readers to learn is the charm of an original
     narrative.... The explorers of various nations are represented in
     this book. There are Northmen, Italians, Englishmen, Frenchmen,
     Spaniards, and Dutchmen.--_Preface._

These original accounts cover the field of American exploration from
the discovery of the country by the Northmen in 985 to the settlement
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1629.


KING, C.F.
               Roundabout Rambles in Northern Europe.
               Lothrop. 1.25

This very fully illustrated volume gives a conversational account of a
trip through Great Britain, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and  (p. 211)
Russia. It is an excellent book for children to use while travelling.
Mr. King has also prepared several about our own country.


LUMMIS, C.F.
               Some Strange Corners of Our Country.
               Century. 1.50

Mr. Lummis describes the wonders of the Southwest,--the Grand Canon,
the Petrified Forest of Arizona, and the Desert. He tells of the
Moquis in their seven seldom visited Pueblo cities, of the Navajos and
other Indian tribes, with their strange customs, dances, and magic.



HYGIENE

     Life is not mere living, but the enjoyment of health.
                                        MARTIAL.


WOOD-ALLEN, M. (S.).
               The Man Wonderful, or The Marvels of Our Bodily Dwelling.
               Educational. 1.00

     The author in this volume has united metaphor with scientific
     facts.... She has laid under contribution the latest scientific
     authorities, and believes that this book will be found abreast of
     the science of to-day, holding ever to truth as it now presents
     itself, and never sacrificing facts to the allegory.--_Preface._

Dr. Wood-Allen uses the simile of a house in explaining in a clear and
interesting manner much about our body and its functions. Part Second
is devoted to the articles we make use of: those which are         (p. 212)
beneficial, and especially those which are more or less harmful; as
tea, coffee, tobacco, and alcohol.



MYTHOLOGY, FOLK-LORE, LEGENDS, AND FAIRY TALES

  "I, Phoebus, sang those songs that gained so much renown,
  I, Phoebus, sang them; Homer only wrote them down."


BULFINCH, THOMAS.
               The Age of Fable.
               Edited by E.E. Hale.
               Lothrop. 1.25

     This book is an enlarged and revised edition of a book published,
     with the same title, by the late Thomas Bulfinch, of Boston, in
     the year 1855.... What Mr. Bulfinch wanted to do, and succeeded
     in doing, was to connect the old stories with modern literature.
     His book, therefore, not only interests young people in the
     classical authors, but it turns their attention to many of the
     best authors of their own language and of our time.--_Preface._

In the revision the list of poets cited has been increased from forty
to sixty-three, and the portion treating of Northern, Oriental, and
Egyptian mythologies, rewritten. The illustrations are from classical
sources.



POETRY, COLLECTIONS OF POETRY AND PROSE, AND STORIES ADAPTED FROM  (p. 213)
GREAT AUTHORS

  And, as imagination bodies forth
  The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
  Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
  A local habitation and a name.
                                        SHAKSPERE.


NORTON, C.E. (Editor).
               Heart of Oak Books. Volume VII.
               Masterpieces of Literature.
               Heath. .60

     The youth who shall become acquainted with the contents of these
     volumes will share in the common stock of the intellectual life
     of the race to which he belongs; and will have the door opened to
     him of all the vast and noble resources of that life.--_Preface._


SCOTT, WALTER.
               The Lady of the Lake.
               Edited by W.J. Rolfe.
               Houghton. .75

     The ancient manners, the habits and customs of the aboriginal
     race by whom the Highlands of Scotland were inhabited, had always
     appeared to me peculiarly adapted to poetry. The change in their
     manners, too, had taken place almost within my own time, or at
     least I had learned many particulars concerning the ancient state
     of the Highlands from the old men of the last generation. I had
     always thought the old Scottish Gael highly adapted for poetical
     composition.... I had also read a great deal, seen much, and
     heard more, of that romantic country where I was in the habit of
     spending some time every Autumn; and the scenery of Loch      (p. 214)
     Katrine was connected with the recollection of many a dear friend
     and merry expedition of former days. This poem, the action of
     which lay among scenes so beautiful and so deeply imprinted on my
     recollections, was a labor of love, and it was no less so to
     recall the manners and incidents introduced. The frequent custom
     of James IV, and particularly of James V, to walk through their
     kingdom in disguise, afforded me the hint of an incident which
     never fails to be interesting if managed with the slightest
     address or dexterity.--_Introduction to the Edition of 1830._

The Lady of the Lake was first published in 1810. This edition has
many notes by Mr. Rolfe.


SCOTT, WALTER.
               The Lay of the Last Minstrel.
               Edited by W.J. Rolfe.
               Houghton. .75

     The Poem, now offered to the Public, is intended to illustrate
     the customs and manners which anciently prevailed on the Borders
     of England and Scotland.... The date of the Tale itself is about
     the middle of the sixteenth century, when most of the personages
     actually flourished. The time occupied by the action is Three
     Nights and Three Days.--_Original Preface._

The Lay of the Last Minstrel was first published in 1805. This edition
has many notes by Mr. Rolfe.


SCOTT, WALTER.
               Marmion.
               Edited by W.J. Rolfe.
               Houghton. .75

     The present story turns upon the private adventures of a
     fictitious character, but is called a Tale of Flodden Field,
     because the hero's fate is connected with that memorable      (p. 215)
     defeat and the causes which led to it.... The poem opens about
     the commencement of August, and concludes with the defeat of
     Flodden, 9th September, 1513.--_Original Preface._

Marmion was first published in 1818. This edition has many notes by
Mr. Rolfe.


SCUDDER, H.E. (Editor).
               American Poems.
               Houghton. 1.00

Longfellow, Whittier, Bryant, Holmes, Lowell, and Emerson, are
represented in this collection by poems with which every American boy
and girl should be familiar. The volume, which has biographical
sketches and notes by Mr. Scudder, was prepared in the interests of
young people, to encourage in them a taste for the best literature.
Evangeline, Snow-Bound, Sella, Grandmother's Story, The Vision of Sir
Launfal, and The Adirondacks, are included in the contents.



RELIGION AND ETHICS

     Hearing thy Master, or likewise the Preacher, wriggle not
     thyself, as seeming unable to contain thyself within thy
     skin.--_Youth's Behaviour. 1643._


HALE, E.E.
               How to Do It.
               Little. 1.00

Brimful of well-balanced advice on making life helpful and pleasant to
those around us and to ourselves by the avoidance of common errors and
the encouraging of agreeable virtues. The familiar friendly        (p. 216)
style renders this book, which could so easily be made dull, really
delightful to young people. How to Talk, How to Go into Society, How
to Travel, Life in Vacation, and Habits of Reading, are some of the
chapter headings.



SCIENCE, OUT-OF-DOOR BOOKS, AND STORIES OF ANIMALS

     To know that which before us lies in daily life is the prime of
     wisdom.
                                        MILTON.


ADAMS, J.H.
               Harper's Electricity Book for Boys.
               Harper. 1.75

A large part of this volume is somewhat beyond the grasp of the
average boy of fourteen, and parents should look it over carefully
before letting their children carry out the instructions, though we
are told that "there need be no concern whatever as to possible danger
if the book is read with reasonable intelligence. Mr. Adams has taken
pains to place danger-signals wherever special precautions are
advisable, and, as a father of boys who are constantly working with
electricity in his laboratory, he may be relied upon as a safe and
sure counsellor and guide."

Directions are given for making, among other things, push-buttons,
switches, annunciators, dynamos, simple telephones, and line and
wireless telegraphs. There is a chapter on electroplating. At the  (p. 217)
end of the volume is an article explaining electric light, heat, power,
and traction, by J.B. Baker, technical editor, United States Geological
Survey; also a dictionary of electrical terms. Many working diagrams
are included.


BAILEY, F.M.
               Handbook of Birds of the Western United States.
               Illustrated by Louis Agassiz Fuertes.
               Houghton. 3.50

     Systematically arranged. Descriptions technical but simplified,
     and illustrated with cuts in the text, which explain the
     technical terms and make it available for students. It has no
     color key, but field keys, fully illustrated in the text.
     Biographies popularly treated. Intended for students of the life
     and habits of the birds of our Western States. The only book of
     its character for that region.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.

There are thirty-three full-page plates by Mr. Fuertes, and over six
hundred small illustrations. For the use of beginners a brief field
color key to genera of some of the common Passerine birds is given in
an appendix.


BURROUGHS, JOHN.
               Wake-Robin.
               Houghton. 1.25

     This is mainly a book about the birds, or more properly an
     invitation to the study of Ornithology.... I have reaped my
     harvest more in the woods than in the study; what I offer, in
     fact, is a careful and conscientious record of actual
     observations and experiences, and is true as it stands        (p. 218)
     written, every word of it.... A more specific title for the
     volume would have suited me better, but not being able to satisfy
     myself in this direction, I cast about for a word thoroughly in
     the atmosphere and spirit of the book, which I hope I have found
     in "Wake-Robin"--the common name of the white Trillium, which
     blooms in all our woods, and which marks the arrival of all the
     birds.--_Preface._

The titles of some of the different articles are: In the Hemlocks, The
Adirondacks, Spring at the Capital, and The Bluebird.


CHAPMAN, E.M.
               Handbook of Birds of Eastern North America.
               Appleton. 3.00

     Illustrated with full-page plates from photographs, and many cuts
     in the text. Systematically arranged; non-technical descriptions;
     both field and color keys. A very complete book for general use,
     treating all the birds of the section named, with some account of
     habits, etc. It has introductory chapters on Ornithology, Methods
     of Study, List of Dates of Spring and Fall migration, and a color
     chart to help in identification.
                                        AUDUBON SOCIETY.


DITMARS, R.L.
               The Reptile Book.
               Doubleday. 4.00

Mr. Ditmars, Curator of Reptiles in the New York Zooelogical Park,
gives us a comprehensive treatise on the structure and habits of the
turtles, tortoises, crocodilians, lizards, and snakes, of the United
States and Northern Mexico. There are eight pages of plates in color
and one hundred and twenty-eight in black and white, from          (p. 219)
photographs from life, taken (with six exceptions) by the Author.

     In the present work the writer has sought to compile a popular
     review of a great fauna--the Reptiles of North America. He has
     excluded technical phraseology and tried to produce two results:
     1. A popular book, that may be comprehended by the beginner and,
     2. A book valuable in its details to the technical
     worker.--_Preface._


GIBSON, W.H.
               Sharp Eyes.
               Harper. 2.50

This rambler's calendar of fifty-two weeks among insects, birds, and
flowers, is made attractive to young children by the unusual quality
of the many illustrations.


GREENE, HOMER.
               Coal and the Coal Mines.
               Houghton. .75

     It has been the aim of the author to give reliable information
     free from minute details and technicalities. That information has
     been, for the most part, gathered through personal experience in
     the mines.--_Preface._

The composition and formation of coal, its discovery and introduction,
are dealt with, and a description of the mine and its dangers, and the
life of the workers therein, is given in this thoroughly satisfactory
little volume.


HARRINGTON, M.W.
               About the Weather.
               Appleton. .65

Treated from a broad scientific standpoint, much interesting       (p. 220)
information is conveyed about the laws which, discovered comparatively
recently, have proved of vital importance and utility to mankind. The
humidity and pressure of the air, the velocity of the wind, rain and
snow, sleet and hail-storms, tornadoes and cyclones, are among the
many topics discussed.


HOLLAND, W.J.
               The Moth Book.
               Doubleday. 4.00

An intelligent boy or girl of fourteen, with a real interest in the
subject, will enjoy this fine work on the moths of North America north
of Mexico, though it is written more from the standpoint of the
student than are most of the series to which it belongs. There are
fifteen hundred figures in the forty-eight colored plates, and three
hundred black and white text figures, illustrating a majority of the
larger species.


JORDAN, D.S., and B.W. EVERMANN.
               American Food and Game Fishes.
               Doubleday. 4.00

These two distinguished scientists have given in this treatise on
ichthyology a popular account of the species found in America north of
the Equator, with keys for ready identification, life-histories, and
methods of capture. There are ten lithographed plates in color, and
sixty-four in black and white from photographs from life taken by  (p. 221)
Mr. Dugmore, these being the first really successful photographs of
live fish ever secured.


KEELER, H.L.
               Our Native Trees, and How to Identify Them.
               Scribner. 2.00

     A guide to the identification of the trees of the United States,
     with three hundred and forty illustrations, more than half of
     them from photographs. The book is the work of one who is a
     tree-lover as well as a botanist, and besides being
     scientifically accurate the book has a distinct literary flavor.
     Invaluable as an aid to firsthand acquaintance with the
     trees.--_Prentice and Power._

The volume is not too large to be easily carried while walking.


LUCAS, F.A.
               Animals of the Past.
               Illustrated by C.R. Knight and Others.
               Doubleday. 2.00

     The object of this book is to tell some of the interesting facts
     concerning a few of the better known or more remarkable of these
     extinct inhabitants of the ancient world.--_Introduction._

     "Mr. Knight ... is the one modern artist who can picture
     prehistoric animals with artistic charm of presentation as well
     as with full scientific accuracy."

While Mr. Lucas did not, in this instance, write for children, they
greatly enjoy his descriptions, and are captivated by Mr. Knight's
pictures of the strange creatures. There is a very interesting chapter
on The Ancestry of the Horse.

  "Said the little Eohippus                                        (p. 222)
  I am going to be a horse
  And on my middle finger-nails
  To run my earthly course."


NEWCOMB, SIMON.
               Astronomy for Everybody.
               Doubleday. 2.00

When a work, by an authority as eminent as Professor Newcomb, is
interesting to young people, and is to a sufficient degree within
their comprehension, it should certainly be put into their hands, even
if, as in the present case, it was not specially prepared for them.


PARSONS, F.T. (S.) (formerly Mrs. W.S. DANA).
               How to Know the Ferns.
               Scribner. 1.50

This companion to How to Know the Wild Flowers gives in convenient
form a great deal of pleasantly told information as to the names,
haunts, and habits, of our common ferns. They are arranged in six
groups, the classification being based on the frond differences. In
almost all cases the nomenclature of Gray's Manual has been followed,
and in parentheses, that used in the Illustrated Flora of Britton and
Brown is given. Indices to the Latin and English names and to
technical terms are included. The many illustrations are helpful.


ROGERS, J.E.
               The Shell Book.
               Doubleday. 4.00

     Every person interested in shells has felt the need of a      (p. 223)
     manual of the shell-bearing animals of sea and land, comparable
     to the comprehensive manuals provided for those who wish to study
     birds or insects or trees.... The plan and nomenclature of this
     book follow the accepted standard, The Manual of Conchology, by
     Tryon and Pilsbry.--_Preface._

Miss Rogers has made an extensive study of conchology on the east and
west coasts of North America. The result is this popular guide to a
knowledge of the families of living mollusks, which is also an aid to
the identification of shells native and foreign. There is a chapter on
the maintenance of aquariums and snaileries. Eight of the plates are
in color, and ninety-six in black and white for the most part from
photographs by A.R. Dugmore.


ROGERS, J.E.
               The Tree Book.
               Doubleday. 4.00

Most of this volume is devoted to teaching us in an interesting manner
how to know the trees of North America. There are, in addition,
articles on Forestry, The Uses of Wood, and The Life of the Trees.
Sixteen of the plates are in color and one hundred and sixty in black
and white from photographs by Mr. Dugmore.


ST. JOHN, T.M.
               Wireless Telegraphy.
               St. John. 1.00

     Theoretical and practical information, together with complete
     directions for performing numerous experiments on wireless
     telegraphy with simple home-made apparatus.--_Title-page._


SHARP, D.L.                                                        (p. 224)
               A Watcher in the Woods.
               Illustrated by Bruce Horsfall.
               Century. .84

These talks about our small animal neighbors are full of descriptive
interest, and the accompanying black and white illustrations are
beautiful.

Mr. Burroughs says: Of all the nature books of recent years, I look
upon Mr. Sharp's as the best.


VOOGT, GOSEWINUS DE.
               Our Domestic Animals.
               Translated by Katharine P. Wormeley.
               Ginn. 3.50

While this large volume gives much information in regard to the
habits, intelligence, and usefulness, of those animals which have
helped man's civilization forward, the text is not nearly as
interesting as it might have been made. The many illustrations,
however, are very satisfactory.



STORIES

  Dreams, books, are each a world; and books, we know,
  Are a substantial world, both pure and good:
  Round these, with tendrils strong as flesh and blood,
  Our pastime and our happiness will grow.
                                        WORDSWORTH.


BULLEN, F.T.
               The Cruise of the Cachalot.
               Appleton. 1.50

     I've never read anything that equals it in its deep-sea       (p. 225)
     wonder and mystery; nor do I think that any book before has so
     completely covered the whole business of whale-fishing, and at
     the same time given such real and new sea pictures.
                                        RUDYARD KIPLING.

     In the following pages an attempt has been made--it is believed
     for the first time--to give an account of the cruise of a South
     Sea whaler from the seaman's standpoint.--_Preface._

  A strong nor'wester's blowing, Bill!
  Hark! don't ye hear it roar now?
  Lord help 'em, how I pities them
  Unhappy folks on shore now!
                                        WILLIAM PITT.


CHARLES, E. (R.).
               Chronicles of the Schoenberg-Cotta Family.
               Burt. .75

This diary of Reformation days is fictitious, but it serves to bring
most vividly before us Luther and the men of his time.


GARLAND, HAMLIN.
               The Long Trail.
               Harper. 1.25

     Develops from a conventional and unpromising opening into a vivid
     realistic story of an ambitious youth's perilous journey to the
     Klondike. Author writes from personal experience of the overland
     route, and principal characters reveal qualities of
     unselfishness, perseverance, and pluck.
                                        NEW YORK STATE LIBRARY.


GASKELL, E.C. (S.).
               Cranford.
               Illustrated by Hugh Thomson.
               Macmillan. 1.50

Mrs. Gaskell's masterpiece, which Lord Houghton described as       (p. 226)
"the finest piece of humoristic description that has been added to
British literature since Charles Lamb."

Calm and composure breathe from every page of this picture of life in
a small English town during the first half of the nineteenth century.
Have we not all in imagination visited Miss Jenkyns and Miss Matty,
played preference at Miss Betty Barker's, and helped the Honorable
Mrs. Jamieson into her sedan chair? Many girls of fourteen are quite
able to appreciate the book's charm.


IRVING, WASHINGTON.
               The Alhambra.
               Illustrated by Joseph Pennell.
               Macmillan. 1.50

It will be strange indeed if these fascinating and romantic tales fail
to stir the imagination of any young person who reads them and to
arouse in him the laudable ambition of some day seeing for himself the
three palaces, the mosque, the chapel, and the halls, of the
marvellous Alhambra.

     The work was the amusement of his leisure moments, filling the
     interval between the completion of one serious, and now all but
     unknown, history and the beginning of the next.... And thus his
     name has become so closely associated with the place that, just
     as Diedrich Knickerbocker will be remembered while New York
     stands, so Washington Irving cannot be forgotten so long as the
     Red Palace looks down upon the Vega and the tradition of the Moor
     lingers in Granada.
                                        E.R. PENNELL.


IRVING, WASHINGTON.                                                (p. 227)
               Bracebridge Hall.
               Illustrated by Randolph Caldecott.
               Macmillan. 1.50

     "The reader, if he has perused the volume of the Sketch Book,
     will probably recollect something of the Bracebridge family, with
     which I once passed a Christmas. I am now on another visit at the
     Hall, having been invited to a wedding which is shortly to take
     place.... The family mansion is an old manor-house, standing in a
     retired and beautiful part of Yorkshire. Its inhabitants have
     been always regarded through the surrounding country as 'the
     great ones of the earth,' and the little village near the hall
     looks up to the squire with almost feudal homage.... While
     sojourning in this stronghold of old fashions, it is my intention
     to make occasional sketches of the scenes and characters before
     me."

     The success of Old Christmas has suggested the republication of
     its sequel Bracebridge Hall, illustrated by the same able pencil,
     but condensed so as to bring it within reasonable size and
     price.--_Preface._


IRVING, WASHINGTON.
               Old Christmas.
               Illustrated by Randolph Caldecott.
               Macmillan. 1.50

No one could be better fitted to depict the old customs of an English
Christmas than Mr. Caldecott, and his pictures are a perfect
accompaniment to this portion of Washington Irving's Sketch Book.

  A man might then behold
  At Christmas, in each hall
  Good fires to curb the cold,
  And meat for great and small.

  The neighbors were friendly bidden,                              (p. 228)
  And all had welcome true,
  The poor from the gates were not chidden,
  When this old cap was new.
                                        _Old Song._


IRVING, WASHINGTON.
               Rip Van Winkle, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
               Illustrated by G.H. Boughton.
               Macmillan. 1.50

Irving's two most popular sketches, in which young people delight.

     The spirits of this region must have met Washington Irving more
     than half way, and the rest was like play to him. How real and
     living are all the people of his fancy! Of all the author's
     work--serious and humorous ... Rip Van Winkle took the most
     immediate and lasting grip of his public.
                                        G.H. BOUGHTON.


IRVING, WASHINGTON.
               Rip Van Winkle.
               Illustrated by Arthur Rackham.
               Doubleday. 5.00

Five dollars seems to most of us a large sum to pay for a child's
book, but after seeing Mr. Rackham's remarkable work I think we shall
all agree that there can be no better way of spending our book-money
than in purchasing this fine edition of the famous tale, with its
fifty full-page pictures in color.


KING, CHARLES.
               Cadet Days.
               Harper. 1.25

Boys, especially those with military tendencies, will enjoy        (p. 229)
Captain King's description of life at West Point.


KINGSLEY, CHARLES.
               Westward Ho!
               Illustrated by C.E. Brock.
               Macmillan. 1.50

A glorious tale of the voyages and adventures of Sir Amyas Leigh, a
Devon knight of Elizabethan days.

  Oh, where be these gay Spaniards,
  Which make so great a boast O?
  Oh, they shall eat the grey-goose feather,
  And we shall eat the roast O!
                                        _Cornish Song._


SCOTT, WALTER.
               Ivanhoe.
               Macmillan. 1.25

Scott's masterpiece contains, within the compass of a single volume,
sufficient material for five or six books of romance. Incident follows
upon incident, and holds the reader, young or old, with entranced
attention. The period is that of King Richard I.


SCOTT, WALTER.
               Kenilworth.
               Macmillan. 1.25

The tragic Elizabethan story of Leicester and Amy Robsart. It is not
beyond the comprehension of most young people of fourteen.


SCOTT, WALTER.                                                     (p. 230)
               The Talisman.
               Macmillan. 1.25

     The scene of The Talisman is in Palestine with Richard Coeur de
     Lion and his allies of the Third Crusade. From the contest on the
     desert between the Saracen cavalier and the Knight of the
     Sleeping Leopard to the final Battle of the Standard it is full
     of interest.
                                        CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH.


STEVENSON, R.L.
                Kidnapped.
                Scribner. 1.50

     Being Memoirs of the Adventures of David Balfour in the Year
     1751: How he was Kidnapped and Cast away; his Sufferings in a
     Desert Isle; his Journey in the Wild Highlands; his acquaintance
     with Alan Breck Stewart and other notorious Highland Jacobites;
     with all that he Suffered at the hands of his Uncle, Ebenezer
     Balfour of Shaws, falsely so-called.--_Title-page._


VAILE, C.M.
               Sue Orcutt.
               Wilde. 1.50

In this sequel to The Orcutt Girls Sue continues her education, doing
a little literary work meanwhile. Instead of writing, however, as she
had planned, her happy marriage opens the way for home occupations.
The thread of pleasant romance will, of course, add to the book's
attraction for girl readers.


WALLACE, DILLON.
               Ungava Bob.
               Revell. 1.50

The thrilling adventures of a young trapper in the Labrador and Ungava
regions. Incidentally much information is given in an interesting  (p. 231)
way. Mr. Wallace is well qualified from personal experience to write of
this Northern country.


WIGGIN, K.D. (S.).
               @The Birds' Christmas Carol.
               Houghton. .50

It is only partially true to call this story a sad one, for it is
filled from cover to cover with the Christ-like spirit of love and
helpfulness. It tells of little Carol Bird, a patient crippled child,
who brought sunshine to all those about her, and who touches every
heart. The account of the Christmas dinner which Carol herself gave
for the nine little Ruggles children is very amusing. After the happy
day, while Christmas hymns were sounding, the dear little girl slipped
away to her "ain countree."


YONGE, C.M.
               The Dove in the Eagle's Nest.
               Macmillan. 1.25

Life in the rude days of the Emperor Maximilian I, with scenes in
burgh and castle. Under a woman's influence, Schloss Adlerstein is
changed from a robber stronghold to an abode of peace.




_AUTHOR AND TITLE INDEX_                                           (p. 233)

  _How index-learning turns no student pale,
  Yet holds the eel of science by the tail._
                                        POPE.


A B C of Electricity, The.
          Meadowcroft............................................. 159
Aanrud.
          Lisbeth Longfrock........................................ 70
Abbott.
          A Boy on a Farm.......................................... 47
About the Weather.
          Harrington.............................................. 219
Adams.
          Harper's Electricity Book for Boys...................... 216
          Harper's Indoor Book for Boys........................... 198
Adams and Others.
          Harper's Outdoor Book for Boys.......................... 198
Adelborg.
          Clean Peter and the Children of Grubbylea................ 34
Adventure in Thule, An.
          Black, William. _See_ The Four MacNicols.
Adventures of a Brownie, The.
          Mulock................................................... 66
Adventures of Odysseus, The.
          Marvin, Mayor, and Stawell.............................. 126
Adventures of Reynard the Fox, The................................. 60
Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The.
          Twain................................................... 196
Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls and a Golliwogg, The.
          Upton.................................................... 38
Adventures of Ulysses, The.
          Lamb.................................................... 152
AEneid for Boys and Girls, The.
          Church.................................................. 125
AEsop.
          The Fables of AEsop...................................... 61
Age of Fable, The.
          Bulfinch................................................ 212
Aiken and Barbauld.
          Eyes and No Eyes, and Other Stories...................... 69
Aladdin.
          Crane.................................................... 42
Alcott.
          Little Men.............................................. 189
          Little Women............................................ 161
          Under the Lilacs........................................ 109
Alden.
          The Moral Pirates....................................... 133
Aldrich.
          The Story of a Bad Boy.................................. 161
Alhambra, The.
          Irving.................................................. 226
Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.
          Crane.................................................... 42
Alice in Wonderland.
          Carroll.................................................. 62
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
          Carroll.................................................. 62
Allen, M. (S.) Wood-. _See_ Wood-Allen.
American Animals.
          Stone, Witmer, and Cram................................. 160
American Food and Game Fishes.
          Jordan and Evermann..................................... 220
American Indians.
          Starr................................................... 181
American Poems.
          Scudder................................................. 215
Andersen.
          Fairy Tales from Hans Christian Andersen................. 98
          Stories.................................................. 77
Andrews.
          Each and All............................................. 50
          The Seven Little Sisters Who Live on the Round Ball
            That Floats in the Air................................. 41
          The Stories Mother Nature Told Her Children.............. 56
          Ten Boys Who Lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now ..... 74
Animal Life of Our Sea-shore, The.
          Heilprin................................................ 186
Animals at the Fair, The.
          Blaisdell................................................ 54
Animals of the Past.
          Lucas, F.A.............................................. 221
Anne's Terrible Good Nature, and Other Stories for
  Children.
          Lucas, E.V.............................................. 136
Another Book of Verses for Children.
          Lucas, E.V............................................... 85
Arabella and Araminta Stories, The.
          Smith, Gertrude.......................................... 31
Arkansaw Bear, The.
          Paine.................................................... 83
Arnold.
          Stories of Ancient Peoples.............................. 142
Asbjoernsen.
          Fairy Tales from the Far North........................... 77
Astronomy for Everybody.
          Newcomb................................................. 222
Autobiography.
          Franklin................................................ 202
Ayrton.
          Child-Life in Japan...................................... 76
Aztec Treasure House, The.
          Janvier................................................. 165

Baby Bunting. Caldecott. _See_ his Hey Diddle Diddle.
Baby's Opera, The.
          Crane.................................................... 26
Baby's Own Alphabet, The.
          Crane.................................................... 28
Bailey.
          Handbook of Birds of the Western United States.......... 217
Baker.
          The Boy's Book of Inventions............................ 156
          Boy's Second Book of Inventions......................... 185
Baldwin.
          The Story of Roland..................................... 124
          The Story of Siegfried.................................. 124
          A Story of the Golden Age................................ 99
Ball.
          Starland................................................ 129
Bamford.
          Up and Down the Brooks.................................. 157
Bannerman.
          The Story of Little Black Sambo.......................... 23
Barbauld. _See_ Aiken and Barbauld.
Barbour.
          For the Honor of the School............................. 189
          Four in Camp............................................ 190
Baring-Gould and Gilman.
          The Story of Germany.................................... 200
Barnes.
          The Hero of Erie........................................ 142
Baylor.
          Juan and Juanita........................................ 109
Beale.
          Stories from the Old Testament for Children.............. 55
Beautiful Joe.
          Saunders................................................. 88
Beauty and the Beast.
          Crane.................................................... 43
Bee People, The.
          Morley................................................... 87
Belger. _See_ Baylor.
Ben Comee.
          Canavan................................................. 162
Bennett.
          Master Skylark.......................................... 162
Benton.
          A Little Cook-Book for a Little Girl..................... 92
          Saturday Mornings........................................ 92
Betty Leicester.
          Jewett, S.O............................................. 136
Bible for Young People, The........................................ 47
Bimbi.
          Ouida.................................................... 91
Biographical Stories. Hawthorne. _See_ his Grandfather's Chair.
Bird Book, The.
          Eckstorm................................................ 158
Bird-Life.
          Chapman, F.M............................................ 157
Bird Neighbors.
          Blanchan................................................ 130
Birds' Christmas Carol, The.
          Wiggin.................................................. 231
Birds That Hunt and are Hunted.
          Blanchan................................................ 185
Black, Alexander.
          Photography Indoors and Out............................. 199
Black Beauty.
          Sewell................................................... 88
Black, William.
          The Four MacNicols, and An Adventure in Thule........... 133
Blaisdell.
          The Animals at the Fair.................................. 54
Blanchan.
          Bird Neighbors.......................................... 130
          Birds That Hunt and are Hunted.......................... 185
          Nature's Garden......................................... 130
Blind Brother, The.
          Greene.................................................. 194
Blue Fairy Book, The.
          Lang, Andrew............................................. 65
Blue Poetry Book, The.
          Lang, Andrew............................................ 182
Bolton.
          Famous American Authors................................. 200
          Lives of Girls Who Became Famous........................ 172
Bond.
          The Scientific American Boy............................. 141
Book of Cheerful Cats and Other Animated Animals, A.
          Francis.................................................. 28
Book of Famous Verse, A.
          Repplier................................................ 183
Book of Legends, The.
          Scudder.................................................. 53
Book of Nature Myths, The.
          Holbrook................................................. 51
Book of Nursery Rhymes, A.
          Welsh.................................................... 30
Book of Saints and Friendly Beasts, The.
          Brown.................................................... 61
Book of the Ocean, The.
          Ingersoll............................................... 159
Book of Verses for Children, A.
          Lucas, E.V............................................... 67
Boots and Saddles.
          Custer.................................................. 143
Boston Town.
          Scudder................................................. 145
Boutet de Monvel.
          Joan of Arc.............................................. 59
Boy Craftsman, The.
          Hall..................................................... 93
Boy Emigrants, The.
          Brooks, Noah............................................ 162
Boy Life of Napoleon, The.
          Foa..................................................... 144
Boy on a Farm, A.
          Abbott................................................... 47
Boyesen.
          The Modern Vikings...................................... 109
Boys' and Girls' Plutarch, The.
          White, J.S.............................................. 176
Boy's Book of Explorations, The.
          Jenks, Tudor............................................ 179
Boy's Book of Inventions, The.
          Baker................................................... 156
Boy's Froissart, The.
          Lanier.................................................. 174
Boys' Life of Abraham Lincoln, The.
          Nicolay................................................. 204
Boys of Other Countries.
          Taylor, Bayard........................................... 98
Boys of '76, The.
          Coffin.................................................. 117
Boy's Percy, The.
          Lanier.................................................. 182
Boy's Second Book of Inventions.
          Baker................................................... 185
Bracebridge Hall.
          Irving.................................................. 227
Brassey.
          A Voyage in the Sunbeam................................. 209
Brooke.
          The Golden Goose Book.................................... 33
Brooks, E.S.
          The Century Book for Young Americans.................... 114
          The Century Book of Famous Americans.................... 115
          The True Story of Benjamin Franklin..................... 115
          The True Story of Christopher Columbus................... 93
          The True Story of George Washington...................... 94
          The True Story of Lafayette............................. 116
Brooks, Noah.
          The Boy Emigrants....................................... 162
          The Story of Marco Polo................................. 148
Brown.
          The Book of Saints and Friendly Beasts................... 61
          In the Days of Giants.................................... 61
Browne.
          Granny's Wonderful Chair and Its Tales of Fairy Times.... 51
Brownies: Their Book, The.
          Cox...................................................... 45
Buccaneers and Pirates of Our Coasts.
          Stockton................................................ 147
Building the Nation.
          Coffin.................................................. 143
Bulfinch.
          The Age of Fable........................................ 212
Bull.
          Fridtjof Nansen......................................... 149
Bullen.
          The Cruise of the Cachalot.............................. 224
Bunyan.
          The Pilgrim's Progress................................... 68
Burgess.
          Goops and How To Be Them................................. 35
          More Goops and How Not To Be Them........................ 35
Burnett.
          Little Lord Fauntleroy................................... 89
Burroughs.
          Squirrels and Other Fur-Bearers......................... 131
          Wake-Robin.............................................. 217
Butterfly Book, The.
          Holland................................................. 158

Cadet Days.
          King, Charles........................................... 228
Caldecott.
          The Farmer's Boy......................................... 23
          A Frog He Would a-Wooing Go.............................. 24
          Hey Diddle Diddle, and Baby Bunting...................... 25
          The House that Jack Built................................ 25
          The Milkmaid............................................. 25
          The Queen of Hearts...................................... 25
          Ride a-Cock Horse to Banbury Cross, and
            A Farmer Went Trotting upon His Grey Mare.............. 26
          Sing a Song for Sixpence................................. 26
Camps and Firesides of the Revolution.
          Hart and Hill, Mabel.................................... 145
Canavan.
          Ben Comee............................................... 162
Canfield, and Others.
          What Shall We Do Now?.................................... 73
Captains Courageous.
          Kipling................................................. 166
Captains of Industry.
          Parton.................................................. 174
Careers of Danger and Daring.
          Moffett................................................. 187
Carove.
          The Story without an End................................. 71
Carpenter.
          South America........................................... 149
Carroll.
          Alice in Wonderland...................................... 62
          Alice's Adventures in Wonderland......................... 62
          Through the Looking-Glass................................ 63
Carruth.
          Letters to American Boys................................ 184
Castle Blair.
          Shaw.................................................... 168
Catherwood.
          The Heroes of the Middle West............................ 94
Cave Boy of the Age of Stone, The.
          McIntyre................................................. 90
Celtic Fairy Tales.
          Jacobs................................................... 80
Century Book for Young Americans, The.
          Brooks, E.S............................................. 114
Century Book of Famous Americans, The.
          Brooks, E.S............................................. 115
Cervantes.
          Don Quixote of the Mancha............................... 127
Champlin.
          The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Common Things............ 87
          The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Literature and Art...... 177
          The Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Persons and Places....... 94
          Young Folks' History of the War for the Union........... 201
Chapin.
          Masters of Music; Their Lives and Works................. 201
          The Story of the Rhinegold............................... 99
          Wonder Tales from Wagner................................ 100
Chapman, A.B. _See_ Hart and Chapman.
Chapman, F.M.
          Bird-Life............................................... 157
          Handbook of Birds of Eastern North America.............. 218
Charles.
          Chronicles of the Schoenberg-Cotta Family............... 225
Chaucer for Children.
          Haweis.................................................. 105
Chenoweth.
          Stories of the Saints................................... 116
Child-Life.
          Whittier................................................. 54
Child-Life in Japan.
          Ayrton................................................... 76
Childhood of Ji-shib, the Ojibwa, The.
          Jenks, A.E.............................................. 111
Childhood of the World, The.
          Clodd................................................... 157
Children of the Cold, The.
          Schwatka................................................. 97
Children's Book, The.
          Scudder.................................................. 48
Children's Farm, The............................................... 21
Children's Series of the Modern Reader's Bible. Moulton.
          Bible Stories. New Testament............................. 55
          Bible Stories. Old Testament............................. 55
Children's Stories in American History.
          Wright, H.C.............................................. 76
Children's Stories of the Great Scientists.
          Wright, H.C............................................. 176
Child's Garden of Verses, A.
          Stevenson. Illustrated by Charles Robinson............... 30
Child's Garden of Verses, A.
          Stevenson. Illustrated by J.W. Smith..................... 29
Child's History of England, A.
          Dickens................................................. 143
Child's Rainy Day Book, The.
          White, Mary.............................................. 50
Chilhowee Boys.
          Morrison................................................ 137
Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes.
          Headland................................................. 36
Chronicles of the Schoenberg-Cotta Family.
          Charles................................................. 225
Church.
          The AEneid for Boys and Girls........................... 125
          The Iliad for Boys and Girls............................ 125
          Stories of the East from Herodotus...................... 172
          Three Greek Children.................................... 134
          A Young Macedonian in the Army of Alexander the Great... 190
Cinderella.
          Crane.................................................... 43
Clean Peter and the Children of Grubbylea.
          Adelborg................................................. 34
Clemens. _See_ Twain.
Clement.
          Stories of Art and Artists.............................. 143
Clodd.
          The Childhood of the World.............................. 157
Coal and the Coal Mines.
          Greene.................................................. 219
Coffin.
          The Boys of '76......................................... 117
          Building the Nation..................................... 143
          Old Times in the Colonies............................... 117
Collodi.
          Pinocchio, The Adventures of a Marionette................ 63
Colonial Children.
          Hart and Hazard, B.E.................................... 118
Colonization of America, The.
          Gilman................................................... 95
Coolidge.
          What Katy Did........................................... 134
          What Katy Did at School................................. 163
Cooper.
          The Deerslayer.......................................... 163
          The Last of the Mohicans................................ 163
          The Pilot............................................... 190
          The Spy................................................. 191
Cotes.
          The Story of Sonny Sahib................................ 191
Country of the Dwarfs, The.
          Du Chaillu............................................... 96
Cowper.
          The Diverting History of John Gilpin..................... 44
Cox.
          The Brownies: Their Book................................. 45
Cragin.
          Our Insect Friends and Foes............................. 131
Craik, Mrs. D.M. (M.) _See_ Mulock.
Craik, G.M.
          So-Fat and Mew-Mew....................................... 38
Cram. _See_ Stone, Witmer, and Cram.
Crane.
          Aladdin.................................................. 42
          Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves........................... 42
          The Baby's Opera......................................... 26
          The Baby's Own Alphabet.................................. 28
          Beauty and the Beast..................................... 43
          Cinderella............................................... 43
          The Fairy Ship........................................... 27
          The Frog Prince.......................................... 43
          Goody Two Shoes.......................................... 48
          Jack and the Bean-Stalk.................................. 43
          Mother Hubbard........................................... 21
          The Sleeping Beauty...................................... 44
          This Little Pig.......................................... 22
Cranford.
          Gaskell................................................. 225
Creighton.
          A First History of France............................... 117
Crichton.
          Peep-in-the-World....................................... 110
Cruikshank.
          The Cruikshank Fairy Book................................ 64
Cruikshank Fairy Book, The.
          Cruikshank............................................... 64
Cruise of the Cachalot, The.
          Bullen.................................................. 224
Custer.
          Boots and Saddles....................................... 143

Daddy Darwin's Dovecot. Ewing. _See_ her Jackanapes. Dale
  and Fraser, Sheepmen. Hamp.
Dana, R.H.
          Two Years Before the Mast............................... 178
Dana, Mrs. W.S. _See_ Parsons.
Darton.
          Tales of the Canterbury Pilgrims........................ 153
Deerslayer, The.
          Cooper.................................................. 163
Defoe.
          Robinson Crusoe......................................... 135
Deming.
          Indian Child-Life........................................ 32
Diaz.
          The William Henry Letters............................... 110
Dickens.
          A Child's History of England............................ 143
Dickerson.
          The Frog Book........................................... 185
Discovery and Exploration of America, The.
          Gilman................................................... 74
Ditmars.
          The Reptile Book........................................ 218
Diverting History of John Gilpin, The.
          Cowper................................................... 44
Dix.
          Merrylips............................................... 191
          Soldier Rigdale......................................... 192
Dixon.
          Fairy Tales from the Arabian Nights..................... 100
Docas, the Indian Boy of Santa Clara.
          Snedden.................................................. 71
Dodge.
          Hans Brinker............................................ 135
Dodgson. _See_ Carroll.
Dole.
          The Young Citizen....................................... 144
Don Quixote of the Mancha.
          Cervantes............................................... 127
Doubleday. _See_ Blanchan.
Dove in the Eagle's Nest, The.
          Yonge................................................... 231
Drake.
          Indian History for Young Folks.......................... 172
          On Plymouth Rock......................................... 74
Drummond.
          The Monkey That Would Not Kill........................... 89
Du Chaillu.
          The Country of the Dwarfs................................ 96
          The Land of the Long Night.............................. 149
          Wild Life Under the Equator.............................. 97
Duncan.
          Mary's Garden and How It Grew........................... 106

Each and All.
          Andrews.................................................. 50
Early Story of Israel, The.
          Thomas.................................................. 129
Earth in Past Ages, The.
          Herrick................................................. 107
Eastman.
          Indian Boyhood.......................................... 178
Eckstorm.
          The Bird Book........................................... 158
Eckstorm.
          The Woodpeckers......................................... 132
Edgeworth.
          Tales from Maria Edgeworth.............................. 110
Eggleston, Edward.
          The Hoosier School-Boy.................................. 135
          Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans.......... 60
Eggleston, G.C.
          The Last of the Flatboats............................... 164
Egypt.
          Kelly................................................... 150
Elizabeth's Charm-String.
          Forbes.................................................. 164
England.
          Finnemore............................................... 121
Evermann. _See_ Jordan and Evermann.
Every-Day Life in the Colonies.
          Stone, G.L., and Pickett................................. 76
Ewing.
          Jackanapes. Daddy Darwin's Dovecot.
            The Story of a Short Life............................. 192
Eyes and No Eyes, and Other Stories.
          Aiken and Barbauld....................................... 69

Fables of AEsop, The.
          AEsop.................................................... 61
Fairy Ship, The.
          Crane.................................................... 27
Fairy Tales from Hans Christian Andersen.
          Andersen................................................. 98
Fairy Tales from the Arabian Nights.
          Dixon................................................... 100
Fairy Tales from the Far North.
          Asbjoernsen.............................................. 77
Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm.
          Grimm.................................................... 78
Famous Adventures and Prison Escapes of the Civil War............. 201
Famous American Authors.
          Bolton.................................................. 200
Fanciful Tales.
          Stockton................................................ 103
Farmer Went Trotting upon His Grey Mare, A. Caldecott. _See_
  his Ride a-Cock Horse to Banbury Cross.
Farmer's Boy, The.
          Caldecott................................................ 23
Feats on the Fiord.
          Martineau............................................... 166
Fickett. _See_ Stone, G.L., and Fickett.
Fighting a Fire.
          Hill, C.T............................................... 119
Finnemore.
          England................................................. 121
          France.................................................. 149
          The Holy Land........................................... 121
          India................................................... 178
          Italy................................................... 210
          Japan................................................... 179
          Switzerland.............................................. 97
First Book in Geology, A.
          Shaler.................................................. 189
First Book of Birds, The.
          Miller................................................... 87
First History of France, A.
          Creighton............................................... 117
Flaherty. _See_ Gayley and Flaherty.
Flamingo Feather, The.
          Munroe.................................................. 167
Flower Legends for Children.
          Murray................................................... 52
Foa.
          The Boy Life of Napoleon................................ 144
For the Honor of the School.
          Barbour................................................. 189
Forbes.
          Elizabeth's Charm-String................................ 164
Four in Camp.
          Barbour................................................. 190
Four MacNicols, The, and An Adventure in Thule.
          Black, William.......................................... 133
France.
          Finnemore............................................... 149
Francillon.
          Gods and Heroes.......................................... 78
Francis.
          A Book of Cheerful Cats and Other Animated Animals....... 28
Franklin.
          Autobiography........................................... 202
Freeman. _See_ Wilkins.
French, Alice. _See_ Thanet.
French, Allen.
          Heroes of Iceland....................................... 193
          Pelham and His Friend Tim............................... 193
French, H.W.
          The Lance of Kanana..................................... 164
Frere.
          Old Deccan Days.......................................... 78
Fridtjof Nansen.
          Bull.................................................... 149
Frog Book, The.
          Dickerson............................................... 185
Frog He Would a-Wooing Go, A.
          Caldecott................................................ 24
Frog Prince, The.
          Crane.................................................... 43
Frozen North, The.
          Horton.................................................. 150

Gabriel and the Hour Book.
          Stein. 168
Games Book for Boys and Girls, The................................. 59
Garland.
          The Long Trail.......................................... 225
Gaskell.
          Cranford................................................ 225
Gayley and Flaherty.
          Poetry of the People.................................... 104
Geikie.
          Physical Geography...................................... 158
General History.
          Myers................................................... 203
George Washington.
          Scudder................................................. 175
German Household Tales.
          Grimm.................................................... 79
Gibson.
          Sharp Eyes.............................................. 219
Gillie.
          The Kinsfolk and Friends of Jesus....................... 184
          The Story of Stories.................................... 156
Gilman.
          The Colonization of America.............................. 95
          The Discovery and Exploration of America................. 74
          The Making of the American Nation....................... 117
Gilman. _See also_ Baring-Gould and Gilman.
Gladwin. _See_ Zollinger.
Gods and Heroes.
          Francillon............................................... 78
Gold-seeking on the Dalton Trail.
          Thompson................................................ 169
Golden Goose Book, The.
          Brooke................................................... 33
Golden Numbers.
          Wiggin and Smith........................................ 155
Golden Porch, The.
          Hutchinson.............................................. 125
Good.
          Magical Experiments..................................... 186
Good Health.
          Jewett, F.G............................................. 123
Goodwin. _See_ Sage.
Goody Two Shoes.
          Crane.................................................... 48
Goops and How To Be Them.
          Burgess.................................................. 35
Goss.
          Jed..................................................... 193
Gould, S. Baring-. _See_ Baring-Gould.
Grandfather's Chair, and Biographical Stories.
          Hawthorne............................................... 118
Granny's Wonderful Chair and Its Tales of Fairy Times.
          Browne................................................... 51
Grasshopper Land.
          Morley.................................................. 187
Gray Lady and the Birds.
          Wright, M.O............................................. 108
Greek History for Young Readers.
          Zimmern................................................. 176
Greek Sculpture.
          Hurll................................................... 207
Green Fairy Book, The.
          Lang, Andrew............................................ 102
Greene.
          The Blind Brother....................................... 194
          Coal and the Coal Mines................................. 219
Griffis.
          Young People's History of Holland....................... 173
Grimm.
          Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm........................ 78
          German Household Tales................................... 79
Guerber.
          The Story of the Greeks.................................. 74
          The Story of the Romans.................................. 75
Gulliver's Travels.
          Swift................................................... 106
Gypsy Breynton.
          Phelps.................................................. 137
Gypsy's Cousin Joy.
          Phelps.................................................. 138

Hale, E.E.
          How To Do It............................................ 215
          The Man Without a Country............................... 194
Hale, L.P.
          The Peterkin Papers..................................... 111
Half-Hours with the Stars.
          Proctor................................................. 133
Hall.
          The Boy Craftsman........................................ 93
Hamp.
          Dale and Fraser, Sheepmen............................... 194
Handbook of Birds of Eastern North America.
          Chapman, F.M............................................ 218
Handbook of Birds of the Western United States.
          Bailey.................................................. 217
Hans Brinker.
          Dodge................................................... 135
Harper's Electricity Book for Boys.
          Adams................................................... 216
Harper's Indoor Book for Boys.
          Adams................................................... 198
Harper's Outdoor Book for Boys.
          Adams, and Others....................................... 198
Harrington.
          About the Weather....................................... 219
Harris.
          Nights with Uncle Remus................................. 125
          On the Plantation....................................... 194
          Uncle Remus; His Songs and His Sayings.................. 101
Hart and Chapman, A.B.
          How Our Grandfathers Lived.............................. 173
Hart and Hazard, B.E.
          Colonial Children....................................... 118
Hart and Hill, Mabel.
          Camps and Firesides of the Revolution................... 145
Hart and Stevens.
          The Romance of the Civil War............................ 202
Hasluck.
          Knotting and Splicing Ropes and Cordage................. 171
Haweis.
          Chaucer for Children.................................... 105
Hawthorne.
          Grandfather's Chair and Biographical Stories............ 118
          Tanglewood Tales........................................ 101
          A Wonder Book............................................ 79
Hazard, B.E. _See_ Hart and Hazard.
Hazard, Bertha.
          Three Years with the Poets............................... 45
Headland.
          Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes.............................. 36
Heart of Oak Books. Volumes I-VII. Norton.
          Volume I. Rhymes, Jingles, and Fables.................... 37
          Volume II. Fables and Nursery Tales...................... 53
          Volume III. Fairy Tales, Ballads, and Poems.............. 83
          Volume IV. Fairy Stories and Classic Tales.............. 128
          Volume V. Masterpieces of Literature.................... 155
          Volume VI. Masterpieces of Literature................... 183
          Volume VII. Masterpieces of Literature.................. 213
Heidi.
          Spyri................................................... 113
Heilprin.
          The Animal Life of Our Sea-shore........................ 186
Hemstreet.
          The Story of Manhattan.................................. 119
Hero of Erie, The.
          Barnes.................................................. 142
Heroes. The.
          Kingsley................................................. 81
Heroes of Asgard, The.
          Keary.................................................... 81
Heroes of Iceland.
          French, Allen........................................... 193
Heroes of the Middle West, The.
          Catherwood............................................... 94
Herrick.
          The Earth in Past Ages.................................. 107
Hey Diddle Diddle, and Baby Bunting.
          Caldecott................................................ 25
Higginson.
          Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic.......... 151
          Young Folks' Book of American Explorers................. 210
          Young Folks' History of the United States............... 174
Hill, C.T.
          Fighting a Fire......................................... 119
Hill, Mabel.
          Lessons for Junior Citizens.............................. 95
  _See also_ Hart and Hill.
History of the Robins, The.
          Trimmer.................................................. 49
Hodges.
          When the King Came....................................... 86
Hodgson.
          Rama and the Monkeys.................................... 101
Holbrook.
          The Book of Nature Myths................................. 51
          Northland Heroes......................................... 79
Holland.
          The Butterfly Book...................................... 158
          The Moth Book........................................... 220
Holland.
          Jungman................................................. 122
Hollow Tree and Deep Woods Book, The.
          Paine.................................................... 66
Holmes.
          The One Hoss Shay, and Companion Poems.................. 128
Holy Land, The.
          Finnemore............................................... 121
Hoosier School-Boy, The.
          Eggleston, Edward....................................... 135
Hope.
          The World............................................... 122
Hopkins.
          The Sandman: His Farm Stories............................ 38
          The Sandman: His Ship Stories............................ 57
Horne and Scobey.
          Stories of Great Artists................................. 75
          Stories of Great Musicians............................... 75
Horton.
          The Frozen North........................................ 150
Houghton.
          The Russian Grandmother's Wonder Tales................... 80
House that Jack Built, The.
          Caldecott................................................ 25
How Our Grandfathers Lived.
          Hart and Chapman, A.B................................... 173
How To Do It.
          Hale, E.E............................................... 215
How to Know the Ferns.
          Parsons................................................. 222
How to Know the Wild Flowers.
          Parsons................................................. 188
How to Make Baskets.
          White, Mary............................................. 142
How Two Boys Made Their Own Electrical Apparatus.
          St. John................................................ 160
Howard.
          The Insect Book......................................... 186
Hughes.
          Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby........................ 165
Hurll.
          Greek Sculpture......................................... 207
          Michelangelo............................................ 207
          Raphael................................................. 208
          Tuscan Sculpture........................................ 209
Hutchinson.
          The Golden Porch........................................ 125
Iliad for Boys and Girls, The.
          Church.................................................. 125
In Colonial Times.
          Wilkins................................................. 197
In the Days of Alfred the Great.
          Tappan.................................................. 120
In the Days of Giants.
          Brown.................................................... 61
In the Days of Queen Elizabeth.
          Tappan.................................................. 120
In the Days of Queen Victoria.
          Tappan.................................................. 176
In the Days of William the Conqueror.
          Tappan.................................................. 121
India.
          Finnemore............................................... 178
Indian Boyhood.
          Eastman................................................. 178
Indian Child-Life.
          Deming................................................... 32
Indian Fairy Tales.
          Jacobs................................................... 81
Indian History for Young Folks.
          Drake................................................... 172
Ingersoll.
          The Book of the Ocean................................... 159
Inman.
          The Ranche on the Oxhide................................ 165
Insect Book, The.
          Howard.................................................. 186
Iron Star, The.
          True.................................................... 169
Irving.
          The Alhambra............................................ 226
          Bracebridge Hall........................................ 227
          Old Christmas........................................... 227
          Rip Van Winkle.......................................... 228
          Rip Van Winkle, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow......... 228
Island Story, An.
          Marshall................................................. 95
Italy.
          Finnemore............................................... 210
Ivanhoe.
          Scott................................................... 229

Jack and the Bean-Stalk.
          Crane.................................................... 43
Jackanapes. Daddy Darwin's Dovecot. The Story of a Short Life.
          Ewing................................................... 192
Jackson.
          Nelly's Silver Mine..................................... 135
Jacobs.
          Celtic Fairy Tales....................................... 80
          Indian Fairy Tales....................................... 81
Janvier.
          The Aztec Treasure House................................ 165
Japan.
          Finnemore............................................... 179
Japanese Fairy Tales.
          Williston................................................ 66
Japanese Garland, A.
          Peltier................................................. 122
Jed.
          Goss.................................................... 193
Jenks, A.E.
          The Childhood of Ji-shib', the Ojibwa................... 111
Jenks, Tudor.
          The Boy's Book of Explorations.......................... 179
Jewett, P.G.
          Good Health............................................. 123
Jewett, S.O.
          Betty Leicester......................................... 136
          Play Days................................................ 89
Joan of Arc.
          Boutet de Monvel......................................... 59
Johnson.
          Phaeton Rogers.......................................... 136
Jolly Good Times.
          Smith, M.P. (W.)........................................ 112
Jolly Good Times at Hackmatack.
          Smith, M.P. (W.)........................................ 138
Jolly Good Times at School.
          Smith, M.P. (W.)........................................ 112
Jordan and Evermann.
          American Food and Game Fishes........................... 220
Juan and Juanita.
          Baylor.................................................. 109
Judd.
          Wigwam Stories........................................... 64
Julius Caesar.
          Shakespeare............................................. 204
Jungle Book, The.
          Kipling................................................. 102
Jungman.
          Holland................................................. 122
Just So Stories.
          Kipling.................................................. 52

Kaler. _See_ Otis.
Keary.
          The Heroes of Asgard..................................... 81
Keeler.
          Our Native Trees, and How to Identify Them.............. 221
Kelly.
          Egypt................................................... 150
Kenilworth.
          Scott................................................... 229
Kidnapped.
          Stevenson............................................... 230
Kieffer.
          The Recollections of a Drummer-Boy...................... 174
King, C.F.
          Roundabout Rambles in Northern Europe................... 210
King, Charles.
          Cadet Days.............................................. 228
King of the Golden River, The.
          Ruskin.................................................. 103
Kingsley.
          The Heroes............................................... 81
          The Water-Babies......................................... 82
          Westward Ho!............................................ 229
Kinsfolk and Friends of Jesus, The.
          Gillie.................................................. 184
Kipling.
          Captains Courageous..................................... 166
          The Jungle Book......................................... 102
          Just So Stories.......................................... 52
          Puck of Pook's Hill..................................... 181
          The Second Jungle Book.................................. 126
Knightly Legends of Wales, or The Boy's Mabinogion.
          Lanier.................................................. 152
Knights of Art.
          Steedman................................................ 147
Knotting and Splicing Ropes and Cordage.
          Hasluck................................................. 171

Lady Hollyhock and Her Friends.
          Walker................................................... 40
Lady of the Lake, The.
          Scott................................................... 213
La Fontaine.
          La Fontaine's Fables..................................... 64
          Select Fables from La Fontaine........................... 33
La Fontaine's Fables.
          La Fontaine.............................................. 64
Lagerloef.
          The Wonderful Adventures of Nils......................... 82
Lamb.
          The Adventures of Ulysses............................... 152
          Mrs. Leicester's School................................. 112
          Tales from Shakespeare.................................. 154
Lance of Kanana, The.
          French, H.W............................................. 164
Land of the Long Night, The.
          Du Chaillu.............................................. 149
Lang, Andrew.
          The Blue Fairy Book...................................... 65
          The Blue Poetry Book.................................... 182
          The Green Fairy Book.................................... 102
          The Nursery Rhyme Book................................... 29
          The Red Book of Animal Stories.......................... 132
          The Red Fairy Book....................................... 82
Lang, Jeanie.
          The Story of General Gordon............................. 145
Lang, John.
          The Story of Captain Cook............................... 179
Lanier.
          The Boy's Froissart..................................... 174
          The Boy's Percy......................................... 182
          Knightly Legends of Wales, or The Boy's Mabinogion...... 152
Larcom.
          A New England Girlhood.................................. 202
Last of the Flatboats, The.
          Eggleston, G.C.......................................... 164
Last of the Mohicans, The.
          Cooper.................................................. 163
Lay of the Last Minstrel, The.
          Scott................................................... 214
Lays of Ancient Rome.
          Macaulay................................................ 154
Lear.
          Nonsense Books........................................... 37
Lee.
          When I was a Boy in China............................... 180
Legend of Sleepy Hollow, The. Irving. _See_ his Rip Van Winkle.
Lessons for Junior Citizens.
          Hill, Mabel.............................................. 95
Letters to American Boys.
          Carruth................................................. 184
Lisbeth Longfrock.
          Aanrud................................................... 70
Little Ann, and Other Poems.
          Taylor, Jane and Ann..................................... 46
Little Cook-Book for a Little Girl, A.
          Benton................................................... 92
Little Duke, The.
          Yonge................................................... 113
Little Girl of Long Ago, A.
          White, E.O............................................... 58
Little Jarvis.
          Seawell................................................. 138
Little Lame Prince, The.
          Mulock................................................... 83
Little Lord Fauntleroy.
          Burnett.................................................. 89
Little Men.
          Alcott.................................................. 189
Little Pussy Willow.
          Stowe................................................... 139
Little Women.
          Alcott.................................................. 161
Lives of Girls Who Became Famous.
          Bolton.................................................. 172
Long Trail, The.
          Garland................................................. 225
Longfellow.
          The Song of Hiawatha..................................... 85
Lorenzini. _See_ Collodi.
Lossing.
          The Story of the United States Navy, for Boys........... 203
Lucas, E.V.
          A Book of Verses for Children............................ 67
          Anne's Terrible Good Nature, and Other Stories for
            Children.............................................. 136
          Another Book of Verses for Children...................... 85
          Old-Fashioned Tales...................................... 90
Lucas, F.A.
          Animals of the Past..................................... 221
Lummis.
          Some Strange Corners of Our Country..................... 211
Macaulay.
          Lays of Ancient Rome.................................... 154
Macbeth.
          Shakespeare............................................. 205
McIntyre.
          The Cave Boy of the Age of Stone......................... 90
MacLeod.
          Stories from the Faerie Queene.......................... 128
McMaster.
          A Primary History of the United States.................. 119
McMurry.
          Pioneers of the Rocky Mountains and the West............. 95
Magical Experiments.
          Good.................................................... 186
Making of the American Nation, The.
          Gilman.................................................. 117
Man Without a Country, The.
          Hale, E.E............................................... 194
Man Wonderful, or the Marvels of Our Bodily Dwelling, The.
          Wood-Allen.............................................. 211
Marmion.
          Scott................................................... 214
Marryat.
          Masterman Ready......................................... 136
Marshall.
          An Island Story.......................................... 95
          Stories of William Tell and His Friends.................. 96
Martineau.
          Feats on the Fiord...................................... 166
          The Peasant and the Prince.............................. 166
Marvin, Mayor, and Stawell.
          The Adventures of Odysseus.............................. 126
Mary's Garden and How It Grew.
          Duncan.................................................. 106
Master Skylark.
          Bennett................................................. 162
Masterman Ready.
          Marryat................................................. 136
Masters of Music; Their Lives and Works.
          Chapin.................................................. 201
Matthews.
          Tom Paulding............................................ 167
May. _See_ Craik, G.M.
Mayor. _See_ Marvin, Mayor, and Stawell.
Meadowcroft.
          The A B C of Electricity................................ 159
Men of Iron.
          Pyle.................................................... 167
Merchant of Venice, The.
          Shakespeare............................................. 206
Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, The.
          Pyle.................................................... 126
Merrylips.
          Dix..................................................... 191
Michelangelo.
          Hurll................................................... 207
Midsummer-Night's Dream, A.
          Shakespeare............................................. 206
Milkmaid, The.
          Caldecott................................................ 25
Miller.
          The First Book of Birds.................................. 87
          The Second Book of Birds................................ 107
Milly and Oily.
          Ward, M.A. (A.).......................................... 57
Mr. Wind and Madam Rain.
          Musset................................................... 66
Mrs. Leicester's School.
          Lamb.................................................... 112
Modern Vikings, The.
          Boyesen................................................. 109
Moffett.
          Careers of Danger and Daring............................ 187
Monkey That Would Not Kill, The.
          Drummond................................................. 89
Moral Pirates, The.
          Alden................................................... 133
More Good Times at Hackmatack.
          Smith, M.P. (W.)........................................ 168
More Goops and How Not To Be Them.
          Burgess.................................................. 35
Morley.
          The Bee People........................................... 87
          Grasshopper Land........................................ 187
          A Song of Life.......................................... 159
          Wasps and Their Ways.................................... 132
Morrison.
          Chilhowee Boys.......................................... 137
Moth Book, The.
          Holland................................................. 220
Mother Hubbard.
          Crane.................................................... 21
Moulton.
          Children's Series of the Modern Reader's Bible.
          Bible Stories. New Testament............................. 55
          Bible Stories. Old Testament............................. 55
Mulock.
          The Adventures of a Brownie.............................. 66
          The Little Lame Prince................................... 83
Munroe.
          The Flamingo Feather.................................... 167
Murray.
          Flower Legends for Children.............................. 52
Murtfeldt and Weed.
          Stories of Insect Life. Volume II........................ 88
  For Volume I. _see_ Weed.
Musset.
          Mr. Wind and Madam Rain.................................. 66
Myers.
          General History......................................... 203
Myths of the Red Children.
          Wilson, G.L.............................................. 53

Nash.
          Polly's Secret.......................................... 195
Natural History for Young People, A.
          Wood.................................................... 108
Nature's Garden.
          Blanchan................................................ 130
Nelly's Silver Mine.
          Jackson................................................. 135
New England Girlhood, A.
          Larcom.................................................. 202
Newcomb.
          Astronomy for Everybody................................. 222
Nicolay.
          The Boys' Life of Abraham Lincoln....................... 204
Nights with Uncle Remus.
          Harris.................................................. 125
Nonsense Books.
          Lear..................................................... 37
Nordhoff.
          Sailor Life on a Man-of-War............................. 150
Northland Heroes.
          Holbrook................................................ 179
Norton. Heart of Oak Books. Volumes I-VII.
          Volume I. Rhymes, Jingles, and Fables.................... 37
          Volume II. Fables and Nursery Tales...................... 53
          Volume III. Fairy Tales, Ballads, and Poems.............. 83
          Volume IV. Fairy Stories and Classic Tales.............. 128
          Volume V. Masterpieces of Literature.................... 155
          Volume VI. Masterpieces of Literature................... 183
          Volume VII. Masterpieces of Literature.................. 213
Nursery Rhyme Book, The.
          Lang, Andrew............................................. 29

Old Christmas.
          Irving.................................................. 227
Old Deccan Days.
          Frere.................................................... 78
Old-Fashioned Tales.
          Lucas, E.V............................................... 90
Old Indian Legends.
          Zitkala-Sa............................................... 85
Old, Old Fairy Tales, The.
          Valentine................................................ 84
Old Songs for Young America.
          Ostertag................................................. 45
Old Times in the Colonies.
          Coffin.................................................. 117
On Plymouth Rock.
          Drake.................................................... 74
On the Plantation.
          Harris.................................................. 194
One Hoss Shay, The, and Companion Poems.
          Holmes.................................................. 128
Orcutt Girls, The.
          Vaile................................................... 196
Oregon Trail, The.
          Parkman................................................. 180
Ostertag.
          Old Songs for Young America.............................. 45
Otis.
          Toby Tyler; or Ten Weeks with a Circus................... 90
Ouida.
          Bimbi.................................................... 91
Our Children's Songs............................................... 45
Our Domestic Animals.
          Voogt................................................... 224
Our Insect Friends and Foes.
          Cragin.................................................. 131
Our Native Trees, and How to Identify Them.
          Keeler.................................................. 221
Our Young Folks' Josephus.
          Shepard................................................. 146

Page.
          Two Little Confederates................................. 137
Paine.
          The Arkansaw Bear........................................ 83
          The Hollow Tree and Deep Woods Book...................... 66
Parkman.
          The Oregon Trail........................................ 180
Parsons.
          How to Know the Ferns................................... 222
          How to Know the Wild Flowers............................ 188
          Plants and Their Children................................ 70
Parton.
          Captains of Industry.................................... 174
Patterson.
          The Spinner Family...................................... 107
Paul Jones.
          Seawell................................................. 146
Peary.
          The Snow Baby............................................ 71
Peasant and the Prince, The.
          Martineau............................................... 166
Peep-in-the-World.
          Crichton................................................ 110
Pelham and His Friend Tim.
          French, Allen........................................... 193
Peltier.
          A Japanese Garland...................................... 122
Peterkin Papers, The.
          Hale, L.P............................................... 111
Phaeton Rogers.
          Johnson................................................. 136
Phelps.
          Gypsy Breynton.......................................... 137
          Gypsy's Cousin Joy...................................... 138
Photography Indoors and Out.
          Black, Alexander........................................ 199
Physical Geography.
          Geikie.................................................. 158
Pilgrim's Progress, The.
          Bunyan................................................... 68
Pilot, The.
          Cooper.................................................. 190
Pinocchio, The Adventures of a Marionette.
          Collodi.................................................. 63
Pioneers of the Rocky Mountains and the West.
          McMurry.................................................. 95
Plants and Their Children.
          Parsons.................................................. 70
Play Days.
          Jewett, S.O.............................................. 89
Plummer.
          Roy and Ray in Canada................................... 180
          Roy and Ray in Mexico................................... 151
Poetry of the People.
          Gayley and Flaherty..................................... 104
Polly Oliver's Problem.
          Wiggin.................................................. 197
Polly's Secret.
          Nash.................................................... 195
Pope. _See_ Peltier.
Posy Ring, The.
          Wiggin and Smith......................................... 67
Potter.
          The Tale of Benjamin Bunny............................... 39
          The Tale of Peter Rabbit................................. 30
          The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin.............................. 39
Price.
          Wandering Heroes........................................ 120
Primary History of the United States, A.
          McMaster................................................ 119
Prince and the Pauper, The.
          Twain................................................... 169
Proctor.
          Half-Hours with the Stars............................... 133
Psalms of David, The............................................... 68
Puck of Pook's Hill.
          Kipling................................................. 181
Pyle.
          Men of Iron............................................. 167
          The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood...................... 126
          The Story of Jack Ballister's Fortunes.................. 195
          The Story of King Arthur and His Knights................ 102
          The Wonder Clock......................................... 84

Queen of Hearts, The.
          Caldecott................................................ 25

Rainy Day Diversions.
          Wells................................................... 171
Rama and the Monkeys.
          Hodgson................................................. 101
Rame. _See_ Ouida.
Ranche on the Oxhide, The.
          Inman................................................... 165
Raphael.
          Hurll................................................... 208
Raspe.
          Tales from the Travels of Baron Munchausen.............. 105
Real Electric Toy-making for Boys.
          St. John................................................ 188
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.
          Wiggin.................................................. 197
Recollections of a Drummer-Boy, The.
          Kieffer................................................. 174
Red Book of Animal Stories, The.
          Lang, Andrew............................................ 132
Red Fairy Book, The.
          Lang, Andrew............................................. 82
Repplier.
          A Book of Famous Verse.................................. 183
Reptile Book, The.
          Ditmars................................................. 218
Rhymes of Real Children.
          Sage..................................................... 37
Ride a-Cock Horse to Banbury Cross, and A Farmer Went Trotting
  upon His Grey Mare.
          Caldecott................................................ 26
Rip Van Winkle.
          Irving.................................................. 228
Rip Van Winkle, and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
          Irving.................................................. 228
Robinson Crusoe.
          Defoe................................................... 135
Rogers.
          The Shell Book.......................................... 222
          The Tree Book........................................... 223
Roggie and Reggie Stories, The.
          Smith, Gertrude.......................................... 31
Romance of the Civil War, The.
          Hart and Stevens........................................ 202
Rose and the Ring, The.
          Thackeray............................................... 104
Roundabout Rambles in Northern Europe.
          King, C.F............................................... 210
Roy and Ray in Canada.
          Plummer................................................. 180
Roy and Ray in Mexico.
          Plummer................................................. 151
Rules of Conduct, Diary of Adventure, Letters, and Farewell Addresses.
          Washington.............................................. 204
Ruskin.
          The King of the Golden River............................ 103
Russian Grandmother's Wonder Tales, The.
          Houghton................................................. 80

Sage.
          Rhymes of Real Children.................................. 37
Sailor Life on a Man-of-War.
          Nordhoff................................................ 150
St. John.
          How Two Boys Made Their Own Electrical Apparatus........ 160
          Real Electric Toy-making for Boys....................... 188
          Wireless Telegraphy..................................... 223
Sandman: His Farm Stories, The.
          Hopkins.................................................. 38
Sandman: His Ship Stories, The.
          Hopkins.................................................. 57
Saturday Mornings.
          Benton................................................... 92
Saunders.
          Beautiful Joe............................................ 88
Schwatka.
          The Children of the Cold................................. 97
Scientific American Boy, The.
          Bond.................................................... 141
Scobey. _See_ Horne and Scobey.
Scott.
          Ivanhoe................................................. 229
          Kenilworth.............................................. 229
          The Lady of the Lake.................................... 213
          The Lay of the Last Minstrel............................ 214
          Marmion................................................. 214
          Tales of a Grandfather.................................. 175
          The Talisman............................................ 230
Scudder.
          American Poems.......................................... 215
          The Book of Legends...................................... 53
          Boston Town............................................. 145
          The Children's Book...................................... 48
          George Washington....................................... 175
Seawell.
          Little Jarvis........................................... 138
          Paul Jones.............................................. 146
          Twelve Naval Captains................................... 146
Second Book of Birds, The.
          Miller.................................................. 107
Second Jungle Book, The.
          Kipling................................................. 126
Segur.
          The Story of a Donkey.................................... 57
Select Fables from La Fontaine.
          La Fontaine.............................................. 33
Seven Little Sisters Who Live on the Round Ball That
  Floats in the Air, The.
          Andrews.................................................. 41
Sewell.
          Black Beauty............................................. 88
Shakespeare.
          Julius Caesar........................................... 204
          Macbeth................................................. 205
          The Merchant of Venice.................................. 206
          A Midsummer-Night's Dream............................... 206
Shaler.
          A First Book in Geology................................. 189
Sharp.
          A Watcher in the Woods.................................. 224
Sharp Eyes.
          Gibson.................................................. 219
Shaw.
          Castle Blair............................................ 168
Shell Book, The.
          Rogers.................................................. 222
Shepard.
          Our Young Folks' Josephus............................... 146
Ship of State, by Those at the Helm, The.......................... 175
Shipwrecked in Greenland.
          Thompson................................................ 196
Sing a Song for Sixpence.
          Caldecott................................................ 26
Sleeping Beauty, The.
          Crane.................................................... 44
Smith, E.B.
          The Story of Pocahontas and Captain John Smith........... 75
Smith, Gertrude.
          The Arabella and Araminta Stories........................ 31
          The Roggie and Reggie Stories............................ 31
Smith, M.P. (W.)
          Jolly Good Times........................................ 112
          Jolly Good Times at Hackmatack.......................... 138
          Jolly Good Times at School.............................. 112
          More Good Times at Hackmatack........................... 168
Smith, N.A.
          Three Little Marys...................................... 139
  _See also_ Wiggin and Smith.
Snedden.
          Docas, the Indian Boy of Santa Clara..................... 71
Snow Baby, The.
          Peary.................................................... 71
So-Fat and Mew-Mew.
          Craik, G.M............................................... 38
Soldier Rigdale.
          Dix..................................................... 192
Some Strange Corners of Our Country.
          Lummis.................................................. 211
Song of Hiawatha, The.
          Longfellow............................................... 85
Song of Life, A.
          Morley.................................................. 159
South America.
          Carpenter............................................... 149
Spinner Family, The.
          Patterson............................................... 107
Spy, The.
          Cooper.................................................. 191
Spyri.
          Heidi................................................... 113
Squirrels and Other Fur-Bearers.
          Burroughs............................................... 131
Starland.
          Ball.................................................... 129
Starr.
          American Indians........................................ 181
          Strange Peoples......................................... 151
Stawell. _See_ Marvin, Mayor, and Stawell.
Steedman.
          Knights of Art.......................................... 147
Stein.
          Gabriel and the Hour Book............................... 168
Stevens. _See_ Hart and Stevens.
Stevenson.
          A Child's Garden of Verses.
            Illustrated by Charles Robinson........................ 30
          A Child's Garden of Verses.
            Illustrated by J.W. Smith.............................. 29
          Kidnapped............................................... 230
Stevenson.
          Treasure Island......................................... 195
Stockton.
          Buccaneers and Pirates of Our Coasts.................... 147
          Fanciful Tales.......................................... 103
          The Story of Viteau..................................... 169
Stoddard.
          Two Arrows.............................................. 113
Stone, G.L., and Fickett.
          Every-Day Life in the Colonies........................... 76
Stone, Witmer, and Cram.
          American Animals........................................ 160
Stories.
          Andersen................................................. 77
Stories from the Arabian Nights................................... 103
Stories from the Faerie Queene.
          MacLeod................................................. 128
Stories from the Old Testament for Children.
          Beale.................................................... 55
Stories Mother Nature Told Her Children, The.
          Andrews.................................................. 56
Stories of Ancient Peoples.
          Arnold.................................................. 142
Stories of Art and Artists.
          Clement................................................. 143
Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans.
          Eggleston, Edward........................................ 60
Stories of Great Artists.
          Horne and Scobey......................................... 75
Stories of Great Musicians.
          Horne and Scobey......................................... 75
Stories of Insect Life.
          Volume I. Weed........................................... 70
Stories of Insect Life.
          Volume II. Murtfeldt and Weed............................ 88
Stories of the East from Herodotus.
          Church.................................................. 172
Stories of the Saints.
          Chenoweth............................................... 116
Stories of William Tell and His Friends.
          Marshall................................................. 96
Story Hour, The.
          Wiggin and Smith......................................... 49
Story of a Bad Boy, The.
          Aldrich................................................. 161
Story of a Donkey, The.
          Segur.................................................... 57
Story of a Short Life, The. Ewing. _See_ her Jackanapes.
Story of Captain Cook, The.
          Lang, John.............................................. 179
Story of General Gordon, The.
          Lang, Jeanie............................................ 145
Story of Germany, The.
          Baring-Gould and Gilman................................. 200
Story of Jack Ballister's Fortunes, The.
          Pyle.................................................... 195
Story of King Arthur and His Knights, The.
          Pyle.................................................... 102
Story of Little Black Sambo. The.
          Bannerman................................................ 23
Story of Manhattan, The.
          Hemstreet............................................... 119
Story of Marco Polo, The.
          Brooks, Noah............................................ 148
Story of Pocahontas and Captain John Smith, The.
          Smith, E.B............................................... 75
Story of Roland, The.
          Baldwin................................................. 124
Story of Russia, The.
          Van Bergen.............................................. 204
Story of Siegfried, The.
          Baldwin................................................. 124
Story of Sonny Sahib, The.
          Cotes................................................... 191
Story of Stories, The.
          Gillie.................................................. 156
Story of the Cid, The.
          Wilson, C.D............................................. 153
Story of the Golden Age, A.
          Baldwin.................................................. 99
Story of the Greeks, The.
          Guerber.................................................. 74
Story of the Rhinegold, The.
          Chapin................................................... 99
Story of the Romans, The.
          Guerber.................................................. 75
Story of the United States Navy, for Boys, The.
          Lossing................................................. 203
Story of Viteau, The.
          Stockton................................................ 169
Story without an End, The.
          Carove................................................... 71
Stowe.
          Little Pussy Willow..................................... 139
Strange Lands Near Home........................................... 122
Strange Peoples.
          Starr................................................... 151
Strong.
          Talks to Boys and Girls................................. 156
Sue Orcutt.
          Vaile................................................... 230
Swift.
          Gulliver's Travels...................................... 106
Swiss Family Robinson, The.
          Wyss.................................................... 113
Switzerland.
          Finnemore................................................ 97

Tale of Benjamin Bunny, The.
          Potter................................................... 39
Tale of Peter Rabbit, The.
          Potter................................................... 30
Tale of Squirrel Nutkin, The.
          Potter................................................... 39
Tales from Maria Edgeworth.
          Edgeworth............................................... 110
Tales from Shakespeare.
          Lamb.................................................... 154
Tales from the Travels of Baron Munchausen.
          Raspe................................................... 105
Tales of a Grandfather.
          Scott................................................... 175
Tales of the Canterbury Pilgrims.
          Darton.................................................. 153
Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic.
          Higginson............................................... 151
Talisman, The.
          Scott................................................... 230
Talks to Boys and Girls.
          Strong.................................................. 156
Tanglewood Tales.
          Hawthorne............................................... 101
Tappan.
          In the Days of Alfred the Great......................... 120
          In the Days of Queen Elizabeth.......................... 120
          In the Days of Queen Victoria........................... 176
          In the Days of William the Conqueror.................... 121
Taylor, Bayard.
          Boys of Other Countries.................................. 98
Taylor, C.M., Jr.
          Why My Photographs Are Bad.............................. 141
Taylor, Jane and Ann.
          Little Ann, and Other Poems.............................. 46
Ten Boys Who Lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now.
          Andrews.................................................. 74
Thackeray.
          The Rose and the Ring................................... 104
Thanet.
          We All.................................................. 195
This Little Pig.
          Crane.................................................... 22
Thomas.
          The Early Story of Israel............................... 129
Thompson.
          Gold-seeking on the Dalton Trail........................ 169
          Shipwrecked in Greenland................................ 196
Three Greek Children.
          Church.................................................. 134
Three Little Marys.
          Smith, N.A.............................................. 139
Three Years with the Poets.
          Hazard, Bertha........................................... 45
Through the Looking-Glass.
          Carroll.................................................. 63
Toby Tyler; or Ten Weeks with a Circus.
          Otis..................................................... 90
Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby.
          Hughes.................................................. 165
Tom Paulding.
          Matthews................................................ 167
Toward the Rising Sun............................................. 123
Treasure Island.
          Stevenson............................................... 195
Tree Book, The.
          Rogers.................................................. 223
Trimmer.
          The History of the Robins................................ 49
True.
          The Iron Star........................................... 169
True Story of Benjamin Franklin, The.
          Brooks, E.S............................................. 115
True Story of Christopher Columbus, The.
          Brooks, E.S.............................................. 93
True Story of George Washington, The.
          Brooks, E.S.............................................. 94
True Story of Lafayette, The.
          Brooks, E.S............................................. 116
Tuscan Sculpture.
          Hurll................................................... 209
Twain.
          The Adventures of Tom Sawyer............................ 196
          The Prince and the Pauper............................... 169
Twelve Naval Captains.
          Seawell................................................. 146
Two Arrows.
          Stoddard................................................ 113
Two Little Confederates.
          Page.................................................... 137
Two Years Before the Mast.
          Dana, R.H............................................... 178

Uncle Remus; His Songs and His Sayings.
          Harris.................................................. 101
Under the Lilacs.
          Alcott.................................................. 109
Ungava Bob.
          Wallace................................................. 230
Up and Down the Brooks.
          Bamford................................................. 157
Upton.
          The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls and a Golliwogg........ 38

Vaile.
          The Orcutt Girls........................................ 196
          Sue Orcutt.............................................. 230
Valentine.
          The Old, Old Fairy Tales................................. 84
Van Bergen.
          The Story of Russia..................................... 204
Voogt.
          Our Domestic Animals.................................... 224
Voyage in the Sunbeam, A.
          Brassey................................................. 209

Wake-Robin.
          Burroughs............................................... 217
Walker.
          Lady Hollyhock and Her Friends........................... 40
Wallace.
          Ungava Bob.............................................. 230
Wandering Heroes.
          Price................................................... 120
Ward, Mrs. E.S. (P.) _See_ Phelps.
Ward, Mrs. Humphry. _See_ Ward, M.A. (A.)
Ward, M.A. (A.).
          Milly and Olly........................................... 57
Washington.
          Rules of Conduct, Diary of Adventure, Letters, and Farewell
            Addresses............................................. 204
Wasps and Their Ways.
          Morley.................................................. 132
Watcher in the Woods, A.
          Sharp................................................... 224
Water-Babies, The.
          Kingsley................................................. 82
Waters. _See_ Clement.
We All.
          Thanet.................................................. 195
Weed.
          Stories of Insect Life. Volume I......................... 70
  For Volume II _see_ Murtfeldt and Weed.
Wells.
          Rainy Day Diversions.................................... 171
Welsh.
          A Book of Nursery Rhymes................................. 30
Westward Ho!
          Kingsley................................................ 229
What Katy Did.
          Coolidge................................................ 134
What Katy Did at School.
          Coolidge................................................ 163
What Shall We Do Now?
          Canfield, and Others..................................... 73
Wheeler.
          Woodworking for Beginners............................... 114
When I was a Boy in China.
          Lee..................................................... 180
When Molly was Six.
          White, E.O............................................... 58
When the King Came.
          Hodges................................................... 86
White, E.O.
          A Little Girl of Long Ago................................ 58
          When Molly was Six....................................... 58
White, J.S.
          The Boys' and Girls' Plutarch........................... 176
          How to Make Baskets..................................... 142
White, Mary.
          The Child's Rainy Day Book............................... 50
Whittier.
          Child-Life............................................... 54
Why My Photographs Are Bad.
          Taylor, C.M., Jr........................................ 141
Widow O'Callaghan's Boys, The.
          Zollinger............................................... 139
Wiggin.
          The Birds' Christmas Carol.............................. 231
          Polly Oliver's Problem.................................. 197
          Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.............................. 197
Wiggin and Smith.
          Golden Numbers.......................................... 155
          The Posy Ring............................................ 67
          The Story Hour........................................... 49
Wigwam Stories.
          Judd..................................................... 64
Wild Life Under the Equator.
          Du Chaillu............................................... 97
Wilkins.
          In Colonial Times....................................... 197
William Henry Letters, The.
          Diaz.................................................... 110
Williston.
          Japanese Fairy Tales..................................... 66
Wilson, C.D.
          The Story of the Cid.................................... 153
Wilson, G.L.
          Myths of the Red Children................................ 53
Wireless Telegraphy.
          St. John................................................ 223
Wonder Book, A.
          Hawthorne................................................ 79
Wonder Clock, The.
          Pyle..................................................... 84
Wonder Tales from Wagner.
          Chapin.................................................. 100
Wonderful Adventures of Nils, The.
          Lagerloef................................................. 82
Wood.
          A Natural History for Young People...................... 108
Wood-Allen.
          The Man Wonderful, or the Marvels of Our Bodily
            Dwelling.............................................. 211
Woodpeckers,
          The. Eckstorm........................................... 132
Woodworking for Beginners.
          Wheeler................................................. 114
Woolsey. _See_ Coolidge.
World, The.
          Hope.................................................... 122
Wright, H.C.
          Children's Stories in American History................... 76
          Children's Stories of the Great Scientists.............. 176
Wright, M.O.
          Gray Lady and the Birds................................. 108
Wyss.
          The Swiss Family Robinson............................... 113

Yonge.
          The Dove in the Eagle's Nest............................ 231
          The Little Duke......................................... 113
Young Citizen, The.
          Dole.................................................... 144
Young Folks' Book of American Explorers.
          Higginson............................................... 210
Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Common Things, The.
          Champlin................................................. 87
Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Literature and Art, The.
          Champlin................................................ 177
Young Folks' Cyclopaedia of Persons and Places, The.
          Champlin................................................. 94
Young Folks' History of the United States.
          Higginson............................................... 174
Young Folks' History of the War for the Union.
          Champlin................................................ 201
Young Macedonian in the Army of Alexander the Great, A.
          Church.................................................. 190
Young People's History of Holland.
          Griffis................................................. 173

Zimmern.
          Greek History for Young Readers......................... 176
Zitkala-Sa.
          Old Indian Legends....................................... 85
Zollinger.
          The Widow O'Callaghan's Boys............................ 139




_KEY TO PUBLISHERS_

Key Word

ALTEMUS--Henry Altemus Co., Philadelphia.
AMERICAN BAPTIST--American Baptist Publication Society, Philadelphia.
AMERICAN BOOK--American Book Co., New York.
AMERICAN THRESHERMAN--American Thresherman, Madison, Wisconsin.
AMERICAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATION--American Unitarian Association, Boston.
APPLETON--D. Appleton & Co., New York.
BAKER--The Baker & Taylor Co., New York.
BURT--A.L. Burt Co., New York.
CASSELL--Cassell & Co., New York.
CENTURY--The Century Co., New York.
CROWELL--Thomas Y. Crowell & Co., New York.
DE WOLFE--De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., Boston.
DODD--Dodd, Mead & Co., New York.
DOUBLEDAY--Doubleday, Page & Co., New York.
DUFFIELD--Duffield & Co., New York.
DUTTON--E.P. Dutton & Co., New York.
EDUCATIONAL--Educational Publishing Co., Boston.
ESTES--Dana Estes & Co., Boston.
EXCELSIOR PUBLISHING--Excelsior Publishing House, New York.
GINN--Ginn & Co., Boston.
HARPER--Harper & Bros., New York.
HEATH--D.C. Heath & Co., Boston.
HOLT--Henry Holt & Co., New York.
HOUGHTON--Houghton, Mifflin Co., Boston.
JACOBS--George W. Jacobs & Co., Philadelphia.
KEGAN PAUL--Kegan Paul, Trench, Truebner & Co., London.
LANE--John Lane Co., New York.
LIPPINCOTT--J.B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia.
LITTLE--Little, Brown & Co., Boston.
LONGMANS--Longmans, Green & Co., New York.
LOTHROP--Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co., Boston.
MACMILLAN--The Macmillan Co., New York.
McCLURG--A.C. McClurg & Co., Chicago.
McDONOUGH--Joseph McDonough, Albany, N.Y.
McKAY--David McKay, Philadelphia.
MOFFAT--Moffat, Yard & Co., New York.
MUNN--Munn & Co., New York.
NELSON--Thomas Nelson & Sons, New York.
NEWSON--Newson & Co., New York.
NUTT--David Nutt, London.
PAGE--L.C. Page & Co., Boston.
PUTNAM--G.P. Putnam's Sons, New York.
RAND--Rand, McNally & Co., Chicago.
REVELL--Fleming H. Revell Co., New York.
REVIEW--Review of Reviews Office, London.
RUSSELL--R.H. Russell, New York.
S.P.C.K.--Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, London.
SCRIBNER--Charles Scribner's Sons, New York.
SILVER--Silver, Burdett & Co., New York.
SMALL--Small, Maynard & Co., Boston.
ST. JOHN--Thomas Matthew St. John, New York.
STECHERT--G.E. Stechert & Co., New York.
STOKES--Frederick A. Stokes Co., New York.
WARNE--Frederick Warne & Co., New York.
WILDE--W.A. Wilde Co., Boston.

  _May this volume continue in motion,
  And its pages each day be unfurl'd,
  Till an ant has drunk up the ocean,
  Or a tortoise has crawl'd round the world._
                                        FROM THE PRAGMATIC SANCTION.
                                        Paris, 1597.





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