Infomotions, Inc.The skeleton in armor / by Henry W. Longfellow ; [engravings by A. V. S. Anthony]. / Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 1807-1882




Author: Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 1807-1882
Title: The skeleton in armor / by Henry W. Longfellow ; [engravings by A. V. S. Anthony].
Publisher: Boston : J. R. Osgood, 1877, c1876.
Tag(s): vikings juvenile poetry; children's poetry, american; toere; toitt; hallock; toitl; tljat; toe; newport; windmill; ale; minstrels; teas; architecture; forest; tower; mary; sea; tale
Contributor(s): Eric Lease Morgan (Infomotions, Inc.)
Versions: original; local mirror; HTML (this file); printable; PDF
Services: find in a library; evaluate using concordance
Rights: GNU General Public License
Size: 1,284 words (really short) Grade range: 9-11 (high school) Readability score: 61 (easy)
Identifier: skeletoninarmor00longrich
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Sfedeton in 



COPYRIGHT, 1876. 
BY HENRY W. LONGFELLOW. 





of 



THE ENGRAVINGS ARE BY A. V. S. ANTHONY, 

Under whose superintendence the book is prepared. 



ILLUMINATED TITLE-PAGE 
THE ROUND TOWER 

" I was a Viking old!" . 

" By the wild Baltic's strand, 
I, with my childish hand. 
Tamed the gerfalcon" 

<( Oft to his frozen lair 
Tracked I the grisly bear " 

" Many the souls that sped, 
Many the hearts that hied, 
By our stern orders " 

" Many a wassail-bout 

Wore the long Winter out " 



A rtist. 

L. S. IPSEN. 
E. A. ABBEY. 
MARY A. HALLOCK. 

do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 



" Once as I told in glee 
Tales of the stormy sea, 
Soft eyes did gaze on me " ... MARY A. HALLOCK. 

" / wooed the blue-eyed maid, 

And in the forest* s shade 

Our vows were plighted " . . . . do. 

" Loud sang the minstrels all, 

Chanting his glory" ..... do. 

" While the brown ale he quaffed. 

Loud then the champion laughed' 1 '' . . . do. 

" Should not the dove so white 
Follow the sea-mew* s flight ?" . . . do. 

" On the white sea-strand, 
Waving his armed hand, 
Saw we old Hildebrand, 

With twenty horsemen " . . . do. 

" So that our foe we saw 

Laugh as he hailed us " . . . do. 

" Mid-ships with iron keel 

Struck we her ribs of steel " . do. 

" So toward the open main 

Bore I the maiden " . . . . do. 

" Cloud-like we saw the shore 

Stretching to leeward" . . . . . do. 



Time dried the maiden's tears / 
She had forgot her fears, 
She was a mother " 

In the vast forest here, 
Clad in my warlike gear, 
Fell 1 upon my spear " 



MARY A. HALLOCK. 



do. 



[The emblematical border to the last stanza is drawn by Miss HALLOCK; the other 
borders and the vignettes and illustrated half-title are by L. S. IPSEN. 





Jnfrofcucftotv 



THIS Ballad was suggested to me while riding on the sea- 
shore at Newport. A year or two previous a skeleton had 
been dug up at Fall River, clad in broken and corroded armor ; 
and the idea occurred to me of connecting it with the Round 
Tower at Newport, generally known hitherto as the Old Wind- 
mill, though now claimed by the Danes as a work of their early 
ancestors. Professor Rafn, in the Memoires de la Societe Royale 
des Antlquaires du Nord, for 18381839, says: 

" There is no mistaking in this instance the style in which the 
more ancient stone edifices of the North were constructed, the style 
which belongs to the Roman or Ante-Gothic architecture, and which, 
especially after the time of Charlemagne, diffused itself from Italy over 
the whole of the West and North of Europe, where it continued to 
predominate until the close of the twelfth century, that style which 
some authors have, from one of its most striking characteristics, called 
the round arch style, the same which in England is denominated Saxon 
and sometimes Norman architecture. 



" On the ancient structure in Newport there are no ornaments re- 
maining, which might possibly have served to guide us in assigning 
the probable date of its erection. That no vestige whatever is found 
of the pointed arch, nor any approximation to it, is indicative of an 
earlier rather than of a later period. From such characteristics as 
remain, however, we can scarcely form any other inference than one, 
in which I am persuaded that all who are familiar with Old-Northern 
architecture will concur, THAT THIS BUILDING WAS ERECTED AT A PE- 
RIOD DECIDEDLY NOT LATER THAN THE TWELFTH CENTURY. This re- 
mark applies, of course, to the original building only, and not to the 
alterations that it subsequently received ; for there are several such 
alterations in the upper part of the building which cannot be mis- 
taken, and which were most likely occasioned by its being adapted in 
modern times to various uses; for example, as the substructure of a 
windmill, and latterly as a hay magazine. To the same times may 
be referred the windows, the fireplace, and the apertures made above 
the columns. That this building could not have been erected for a 
windmill, is what an architect will easily discern." 

I will not enter into a discussion of the point. It is suffi- 
ciently well established for the purpose of a ballad ; though 
doubtless many a citizen of Newport, who has passed his days 
within sight of the Round Tower, will be ready to exclaim, 
with Sancho : " God bless me ! did I not warn you to have 
a care of what you were doing, for that it was nothing but a 
windmill ; and nobody could mistake it, but one who had the 
like in his head." 



p jpeak! speak! tijou fear^ 

ful 0uest! 

Mtljo, toitt) tt) tjoiloto breast 
^tiJi in rutie armor fcrest, 

Comest to iaunt me! 
Wrapt not in a0tern bairns, 
But toitl) tt)^ fiesljJ^s! palms 
, as if asking alms, 
Dost ttjou tjaunt 




3TJ)en, from tl)ose rabernous 
flashes seemei to rise, 

iutjen tfje jTJortijern skies 

Cleam in ?Deeember; 

, like tlje toater f s floto 
Unfcer iDerember^s snoto, 
Came a DuJi boice of tooe 

Jrom tlje l)eart f s Camber 



f 




Ill 
I teas a Oiking 

beefcs, ttjcwgt) ntanifoiti, 
in song tjas 

taught tijee! 
| 3Take Ijeet), tijat in tij|) 

iost tije tale reijearise, 
lireali a fceali man^ tur0e; 
tljis I saugljt 




"Oft to t)is frozen iair 
flTraekeli I ttje 0risJp bear, 
IStljiJe from mt> patl) tije Ijare 

like a 
Oft tljrougt) ttje forest fcark 

tije toere^tooJf^ bark, 
Until ttje soaring lark 

from tlje meaioio. 





toljen E oilier greto, 
Joining a corsair's areto, 
Ver tlje liark 0ea I fteto 

tlje marauliers. 
teas tl)e life toe Jet> ; 
p ttje souls tljat 
JEan]) tije I)^tt0 tijat 
our stern 




, .-;- 



ira 



VII 

a toassail-bout 
tlje long Minter out ; 
)ften our milmigljt sijout 
jfcet tije rocks crotoing, 
&$ toe tlje Berserk^ tale 
JEeasureti in cups of ale, 
Draining tlje oaken paii, 
jfiilei to o^rftotoing. 



tlje biue^epefc matt), 
, pet Ijaif afraii, 
in tlje forests sljafce 
Our boius toere 
Slntier its loosenei best 
jfluttereti Ijer little breast, 
birtis toitljin tljeir nest 
tlje Ijatok frigljteti. 





in ijer father's tjail 
01eamel> upon ttje toali, 
san0 ttje minstrels all, 
Cljanting 
SStljen of oiti 



1 



JEute liiti tlje minstrels stant> 
Ijear mp storp. 




tlje broton ale Ije quaffei, 
2touti tljen tlje Campion 
as tlje toinli^u$t0 tuaft 

brigtjtlj), 

tlje iouti iau01j of scorn, 
of ti)ose iip0 unsljorn, 
jTrom tlje ieep 

tije foam J 




XIII 

Ijafc E put to sea, 
tlje mail) toitl) me,- 
jfairest of aJi teas 

tlje Norsemen !- 
ou tlje toljite sea^stranli, 
Mlabing tjts armefc IjauD, 
toe olli t)iJliebrauli, 
ttoentp 





XIV 

"Cfjen Jaunetjeli tljep to 
Bent like a reel) ead) mast, 
|)et toe toere gaining fast, 

OTtjen tlje toinfo failel) us; 
,3tnl) toitt) a sul)len flato 
Came rounl) tl)e gustp Jkato, 

tljat our foe toe sato 

as ije ijaileli us. 




",1tnti as to catelj tlje 0ale 
Kounfc beerei tlje flappin 
! teas tl)e 

toitljaut quarter! 
toitl) iron keel 
toe ijer ribs of steel ; 
iDoton Ijer bkek tjuik iiti reel 
ttje blaek toater! 




ill. I/til 




latien, 
open main 
again, 
ijurritane 




XVII 

iTijree toeeks toe toesttoari bore, 
toijen tije storm toas o'er, 
toe 0ato tlje 

to ieetoarb; 

Cljere for mp Jat>D f s! botoer 
Built E tlje loft]) totoer, 
, to tljis ber^ tjour, 
looking seatoarfc. 





XVIII 

libei toe man]) pears; 
ftnte ft net) tije maifcen's tears; 
forgot ijer fears, 
toas a mottjer; 
?DeatI) eiosei Ijer tniJli blue epes, 
Unier tljat totoer stje Jtes; 
5He f er stjail ttje sun arise 
On sud) another! 




XIX 

"j&tiil greto mp bosom ttjen, 
j5>tiJi as a stagnant fen! 
Sjateful to me toere men, 

fije sunJigijt IjatefuJ. 
In tfje bast forest tjere, 
CJat> in mp toarJike gear, 
jfeJi I upon mp spear, 

A fceatl) teas grateful ! 



XX 

"3Tl)us, seameti toitt) manp scars 
Bursting tijese prison bars, 
Up to its natibe stars 
JEp soul asceniei! 
3Ti)ere from the flotointf botoJ 

<* *%j 

Deep Drinks ttje toarrior f s souJ, 
to tl)e jHortijianD ! skoal! 
3Tl)us tlje tale entieD. 




Qtofc 



TO THE LAST STANZA 



Skoal! 

In Scandinavia, this is the customary salutation when drinking a 
health. I have slightly changed the orthography of the word, in order 
to preserve the correct pronunciation. 




If 17 






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Colophon

This file was acquired from Boston : J. R. Osgood, 1877, c1876., and it is in the public domain. It is re-distributed here as a part of the Alex Catalogue of Electronic Texts (http://infomotions.com/alex/) by Eric Lease Morgan (Infomotions, Inc.) for the purpose of freely sharing, distributing, and making available works of great literature. Its Infomotions unique identifier is skeletoninarmor00longrich, and it should be available from the following URL:

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