MARC, MARCXML, and MODS

screencastThis is the briefest of comparisons between MARC, MARCXML, and MODS. Its was written for a set of library school students learning XML.

MARC is an acronym for Machine Readable Cataloging. It was designed in the 1960’s, and its primary purpose was to ship bibliographic data on tape to libraries who wanted to print catalog cards. Consider the computing context of the time. There were no hard drives. RAM was beyond expensive. And the idea of a relational database had yet to be articulated. Consider the idea of a library’s access tool — the card catalog. Consider the best practice of catalog cards. “Generate no more than four or five cards per book. Otherwise, we will not be able to accommodate all of the cards in our drawers.” MARC worked well, and considering the time, it represented a well-designed serial data structure complete with multiple checksum redundancy.

Someone then got the “cool” idea to create an online catalog from MARC data. The idea was logical but grew without a balance of library and computing principles. To make a long story short, library principles sans any real understanding of computing principles prevailed. The result was a bloating of the MARC record to include all sorts of administrative data that never would have made it on to a catalog card, and this data was delimited in the MARC record with all sorts of syntactical “sugar” in the form of punctuation. Moreover, as bibliographic standards evolved, the previously created data was not updated, and sometimes people simply ignored the rules. The consequence has been disastrous, and even Google can’t systematically parse the bibliographic bread & butter of Library Land.* The folks in the archives community — with the advent of EAD — are so much better off.

Soon after XML was articulated the Library Of Congress specified MARCXML — a data structure designed to carry MARC forward. For the most part, it addressed many of the necessary issues, but since it insisted on making the data in a MARCXML file 100% transformable into a “traditional” MARC record, MARCXML falls short. For example, without knowing the “secret codes” of cataloging — the numeric field names — it is very difficult to determine what are the authors, titles, and subjects of a book.

The folks at the Library Of Congress understood these limitations almost from the beginning, and consequently they created an additional bibliographic standard called MODS — Metadata Object Description Schema. This XML-based metadata schema goes a long way in addressing both the computing times of the day and the needs for rich, full, and complete bibliographic data. Unfortunately, “traditional” MARC records are still the data structure ingested and understood by the profession’s online catalogs and “discovery systems”. Consequently, without a wholesale shift in practice, the profession’s intellectual content is figuratively stuck in the 1960’s.

* Consider the hodgepodge of materials digitized by Google and accessible in the HathiTrust. A search for Walden by Henry David Thoreau returns a myriad of titles, all exactly the same.

Readings

  1. MARC (http://www.loc.gov/marc/bibliographic/bdintro.html) – An introduction to the MARC standard
  2. leader (http://www.loc.gov/marc/specifications/specrecstruc.html#leader) – All about the leader of a traditional MARC record
  3. MARC Must Die (http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2002/10/ljarchives/marc-must-die/) – An essay by Roy Tennent outlining why MARC is not a useful bibliographic format. Notice when it was written.
  4. MARCXML (https://www.loc.gov/standards/marcxml/marcxml-design.html) – Here are the design considerations for MARCXML
  5. MODS (http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/userguide/) – This is an introduction to MODS

Exercise

This is much more of an exercise than it is an assignment. The goal of the activity is not to get correct answers but instead to provide a framework for the reader to practice critical thinking against some of the bibliographic standards of the library profession. To the best of your ability, and in the form of an written essay between 500 and 1000 words long, answer and address the following questions based on the contents of the given .zip file:

  1. Measured in characters (octets), what is the maximum length of a MARC record? (Hint: It is defined in the leader of a MARC record.)
  2. Given the maximum length of a MARC record (and therefore a MARCXML record), what are some of the limitations this imposes when it comes to full and complete bibliographic description?
  3. Given the attached .zip file, how many bibliographic items are described in the file named data.marc? How many records are described in the file named data.xml? How many records are described in the file named data.mods? How do did you determine the answers to the previous three questions? (Hint: Open and read the files in your favorite text and/or XML editor.)
  4. What is the title of the book in the first record of data.marc? Who is the author of the second record in the file named data.xml. What are the subjects of the third record in the file named data.mods? How did you determine the answers the previous three questions? Be honest.
  5. Compare & contrast the various bibliographic data structures in the given .zip file. There are advantages and disadvantages to all three.

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Eric Lease Morgan

Artist- and Librarian-At-Large

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